Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Afterburner

Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)

Recommended Posts

This has to go on my list of one of the best desserts I've ever done. You know what it's like, you aren't always sure how something is going to turn out. Then you look at it and just know it's gooing to be delicious-and this is really delicious.

It is a tangerine pudding cake. The texture is very light and fluffy, much like a chiffon type of pie. There is just a hint of tangerine flavor.

I also made some tangerine honey, and that is what is drizzled on the plate. I just melted some honey, tangerine juice and tangerine peel over medium heat then strained it and let it cool to room temperature. The flavor of tangerine in the honey is more enhanced than the pudding cake.

I made some candied tangerine peel and used a whole slice of the candied peel as the base of the pudding cake, with a half slice of candied tangerine for the garnish. You pick up the candied tangerine and eat it like candy for a final, and the most intense, flavor of tangerine in dessert. Hope you enjoy the photo.

gallery_41580_4407_3257.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Argh! That looks amazing, David. There's not much in the sense of get-togethers in my life to even try to construct a plated dessert, and looking at your picture now makes me wish that random people would just drop by. For whom did you make the dessert?


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tri2Cook - thanks for the response. They sound delicious and I might try my hand at it sometime.

LittleIsland - thanks for posting about those cookies. They look and sound like something we would like a lot!

I made a bunch of desserts this weekend. I had to make two desserts (got paid, no really, they promised this time :biggrin: ) for a sheet cake and cupcakes for my daughter's co-ed fraternity's end of year awards banquet (pictures here) and made The Blissful Glutton's Peach/Cherry Crisp:

gallery_34972_3570_1183919.jpg

and a Cherry trifle:

gallery_34972_3570_767788.jpg

for a dinner party on Sunday.

There was not one iota left of the crisp - three people had thirds!!! The trifle was just pure white trash goodness. Cream cheese, Cool Whip, sweetened condensed milk, angel food cake and cherry pie filling :raz:. I jazzed it up a little, by actually toasting my sliced almonds to garnish with :laugh: !

Kim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Argh! That looks amazing, David. There's not much in the sense of get-togethers in my life to even try to construct a plated dessert, and looking at your picture now makes me wish that random people would just drop by. For whom did you make the dessert?

Here's another photo of the dessert

gallery_41580_4407_686975.jpg

This is a great Spring dessert for one or a party of 20. I just made it for myself. You can make the candied tangerine slices up to a week in advance. You can also make the tangerine honey in advance. And finally, you want to make the pudding cakes a day in advance then let them chill in the refrigerator overnight. The assembly of the dish takes just a few minutes-unmold the cake onto a candied tangerine slice, garnish the cake with whipped cream and another candied tangerine slice, a sprig of mint and then a drizzle of the tangerine honey.

I can post the recipe when I get it finished. I've been working on the recipe to include it in a larger piece about citrus desserts to hopefully post on the Daily Gullet page.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and a Cherry trifle:

gallery_34972_3570_767788.jpg

for a dinner party on Sunday.

There was not one iota left of the crisp - three people had thirds!!!  The trifle was just pure white trash goodness.  Cream cheese, Cool Whip, sweetened condensed milk, angel food cake and cherry pie filling :raz:.  I jazzed it up a little, by actually toasting my sliced almonds to garnish with  :laugh: !

I had to laugh at this one. When I was a newlywed I once made a strawberry trifle for a get-together with Sara Lee Poundcake, cream cheese, Amaretto flavored condensed milk and cool whip and half fresh/half frozen sliced strawberries. It was a hit. Ten years later It is still often requested by friends. I reluctantly make it as I can actually make other pretty decent baked goods now, but I just won't die!! I just had to laugh because I can't believe someone else makes this too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried a new recipe yesterday, Lavender Pound Cake with Lemon Glaze. Oh, were they good, very light for a pound cake. I put them in half cup aluminum jello molds; the recipe made 18. Gave half of them to a friend. :rolleyes:

4l80rih.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I tried a new recipe yesterday, Lavender Pound Cake with Lemon Glaze. Oh, were they good, very light for a pound cake. I put them in half cup aluminum jello molds; the recipe made 18. Gave half of them to a friend.  :rolleyes:

4l80rih.jpg

Marigene, these are beautiful. I would love the recipe, if you are willing. I love the flavor combination.

Kim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to thank Klary for pointing me to the right direction (recipe) for these Peanutbutter cupcakes.

Peanutbutter cupcakes (with or without chocolate chunks)

gallery_48583_3741_121165.jpg

With choco chunks

gallery_48583_3741_80151.jpg

Plain but still oh so good...

gallery_48583_3741_164123.jpg


Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this is the place to post the recipe, but here it is. :laugh:

Lavender Pound Cake with Lemon Glaze

Courtesy of Monica Glass

12 miniature cakes (or 18 half-cup size jello molds)

Ingredients

For the cake:

2½ cups sifted all-purpose flour

1½ teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup butter, room temperature

2 cups sugar

4 eggs

2 egg yolks

Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 tablespoons dried lavender, coarsely crushed or ground

¾ cup buttermilk, room temperature

For the sugar glaze:

2 cups powdered sugar, sifted

3 tablespoons heavy cream

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

Equipment

Meat pounder, spice/coffee grinder or food processor to crush the lavender

Stand mixer with paddle attachment

Two 6-cup mini Bundt pans

Microplane grater/zester

Preparation

Generously grease two 6-cup mini Bundt pans with butter or non-stick cooking spray and dust lightly with flour, knocking out excess. Do not preheat oven.

Sprinkle the lavender into the buttermilk and let sit for 10 minutes. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together. Set aside.

Beat the butter in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on medium speed until creamy, about 30 seconds. Gradually add the granulated sugar and continue beating until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes, stopping the mixer occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl using a rubber spatula. Then beat in the eggs one at a time, beating only until incorporated after each addition. Mix in the zest, lemon juice and vanilla.

Mix in the flour mixture and buttermilk alternately, starting and ending with the flour. Beat the final addition only until smooth. Do not over mix.

Spoon the batter into each cup, filling it only ¾ full and distributing it evenly between the 12 Bundt cups. Tap each pan several times on the counter to eliminate air bubbles and level the tops. Place both pans in the cold oven and turn the oven to 325? F. Bake for 30-35 minutes until the tops (which will eventually become the cake bottoms) are risen and golden.

Let the cakes cool in the pans for about 30 minutes, then run a thin knife around outer edge of each cake to loosen and unmold by inverting the pan over onto a wire rack. The cakes will be right-side-up at this point.

Prepare the glaze:

Combine the powdered sugar, heavy cream and lemon juice in a small bowl. Stir with a rubber spatula until the glaze is smooth and of drizzling consistency. Spoon the glaze over the top of each slightly cooled cake, letting some run down unevenly on the sides. Zest the lemon over the tops of the glaze and serve.

[Chef’s Notes: When preparing the Bundt pan for baking, thoroughly grease and flour the molds to ensure the cake will release easily from the pan.

When a recipe calls for sifted flour, it means sift the flour, then measure for accurate results.

This recipe calls for 6-cup mini Bundt pans to make lovely Spring gifts, but feel free to use whatever size pan you desire, as this cake bakes well in a variety of pans – two 8½ x 4½ x 2½-inch loaf pans or one larger 10 x 3½- inch Bundt pan. Just be sure to adjust the baking time to suit.

DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN until at least 30 minutes into baking so your cakes will not fall.

Wrapped in plastic or aluminum foil, the cakes will keep for 3-5 days at room temperature and for up to 3 months in the freezer.]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marigene - thank you so much for posting the recipe! I got a one of those pans with a bunch of cute little flower shaped cupcake pans for Christmas and I think that this would be the perfect recipe for it!

Domestic Goddess - Since Klary was so kind to pass on that recipe, would you please pass it on to me. I am fond of saying that if God made anything better than peanutbutter and chocolate, He kept it for Himself, so they look to be right up my alley!!

Kim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kim, these are like the molds (have 2 dozen) I used. I use equal parts of a flavorless oil and flour mixed together to "oil" the molds so the batter doesn't stick. Hope you enjoy the cakelets as much as we did! :wub:

4muo83t.jpg


Edited by Marigene (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its been so long since I've been around, I don't remember if I've posted these or not:

Lemon Bars:

gallery_23736_355_55764.jpg

Caramel Apple Cupcakes:

gallery_23736_355_28710.jpg

Balzano Apple Cake:

gallery_23736_355_45667.jpg

Whoopie Pies:

gallery_23736_355_27290.jpg


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those look ridiculously good, Patrick! I joined the forum when you weren't around, but your reputation is such that I've been peeking periodically at your Flickr gallery-- you can probably take a picture of a peppercorn and it would look good.

Meanwhile, my Triple Cremes are all gone, so I've been leafing through all my Chocolatiers, plus Flo Braker and CDBPH on what to do next!


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Patrick, it has been very long since you've been around. I forgot how much I love your desserts and photos. Welcome back and we hope to see more of you (and the fruits of your labor) now.

Domestic Goddess, after reading your food blog and realizing what you have to bake with...it is simply amazing what you are able to produce on a regular basis! I know I wouldn't even bother baking without a decent oven (and I do it for a living!). Your sons and DH must be so happy that you have the energy that you do. Please pat yourself on the back for your wonderful peanut butter cupcakes (with chunks please).

Kim Shook, white trash trifle...what can I say...just beautiful!

Everyone...KEEP ON BAKING! So good to see such luscious baked goods being made every day. Pudding cakes, lavender and lemon, textures, colors, flavor combinations. What inspiration :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Torta di Cioccolato di Olio de Oliva e Timo. Inspired by an EG post about savory uses of chocolate, and then subsequently told by my spouse that I couldn't make a sweet with thyme because it wouldn't work, I made a thyme olive oil genoise using clementine infused olive oil, filled with Pierre Herme's chocolate pastry cream, and topped with cinnamon whipped cream and a 70% Cluizel square. My spouse was wrong :raz:

thymetortas.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow thanks for trying my recipe!! i do hope you enjoyed it! it's always a delight to see what others think....feel free to visit www.gildedfork.com for more....

Not sure if this is the place to post the recipe, but here it is.  :laugh:

Lavender Pound Cake with Lemon Glaze 

Courtesy of Monica Glass

12 miniature cakes (or 18 half-cup size jello molds)

Ingredients

For the cake:

2½ cups sifted all-purpose flour

1½ teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup butter, room temperature

2 cups sugar

4 eggs

2 egg yolks

Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 tablespoons dried lavender, coarsely crushed or ground

¾ cup buttermilk, room temperature

For the sugar glaze:

2 cups powdered sugar, sifted

3 tablespoons heavy cream

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

Equipment

Meat pounder, spice/coffee grinder or food processor to crush the lavender

Stand mixer with paddle attachment

Two 6-cup mini Bundt pans

Microplane grater/zester

Preparation

Generously grease two 6-cup mini Bundt pans with butter or non-stick cooking spray and dust lightly with flour, knocking out excess. Do not preheat oven.

Sprinkle the lavender into the buttermilk and let sit for 10 minutes. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together. Set aside.

Beat the butter in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on medium speed until creamy, about 30 seconds. Gradually add the granulated sugar and continue beating until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes, stopping the mixer occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl using a rubber spatula. Then beat in the eggs one at a time, beating only until incorporated after each addition. Mix in the zest, lemon juice and vanilla.

Mix in the flour mixture and buttermilk alternately, starting and ending with the flour. Beat the final addition only until smooth. Do not over mix.

Spoon the batter into each cup, filling it only ¾ full and distributing it evenly between the 12 Bundt cups. Tap each pan several times on the counter to eliminate air bubbles and level the tops. Place both pans in the cold oven and turn the oven to 325? F. Bake for 30-35 minutes until the tops (which will eventually become the cake bottoms) are risen and golden.

Let the cakes cool in the pans for about 30 minutes, then run a thin knife around outer edge of each cake to loosen and unmold by inverting the pan over onto a wire rack. The cakes will be right-side-up at this point.

Prepare the glaze:

Combine the powdered sugar, heavy cream and lemon juice in a small bowl. Stir with a rubber spatula until the glaze is smooth and of drizzling consistency. Spoon the glaze over the top of each slightly cooled cake, letting some run down unevenly on the sides. Zest the lemon over the tops of the glaze and serve.

[Chef’s Notes: When preparing the Bundt pan for baking, thoroughly grease and flour the molds to ensure the cake will release easily from the pan.

When a recipe calls for sifted flour, it means sift the flour, then measure for accurate results.

This recipe calls for 6-cup mini Bundt pans to make lovely Spring gifts, but feel free to use whatever size pan you desire, as this cake bakes well in a variety of pans – two 8½ x 4½ x 2½-inch loaf pans or one larger 10 x 3½- inch Bundt pan. Just be sure to adjust the baking time to suit.

DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN until at least 30 minutes into baking so your cakes will not fall.

Wrapped in plastic or aluminum foil, the cakes will keep for 3-5 days at room temperature and for up to 3 months in the freezer.]


Edited by chefmoni (log)

Pastry PRincess

a day without love, laughter or dessert is a day wasted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

absolutely beautiful! would you mind sharing your recipe for the genoise?

many thanks!

Torta di Cioccolato di Olio de Oliva e Timo.  Inspired by an EG post about savory uses of chocolate, and then subsequently told by my spouse that I couldn't make a sweet with thyme because it wouldn't work, I made a thyme olive oil genoise using clementine infused olive oil, filled with Pierre Herme's chocolate pastry cream, and topped with cinnamon whipped cream and a 70% Cluizel square.  My spouse was wrong  :raz:

thymetortas.jpg


Pastry PRincess

a day without love, laughter or dessert is a day wasted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marigene, thanks for posting our Gilded Fork recipe! FYI, I believe eG does not allow posting of full recipes, as this is copyrighted by us and Monica Glass, so you may want to just post the intro and your photo. Our version of the recipe can be seen here.

And yes, that cake is delicious!! I'm making one today for Mother's Day. :)

Not sure if this is the place to post the recipe, but here it is.  :laugh:

Lavender Pound Cake with Lemon Glaze 

Courtesy of Monica Glass


Edited by Jennifer Iannolo (log)

Jennifer L. Iannolo

Founder, Editor-in-Chief

The Gilded Fork

Food Philosophy. Sensuality. Sass.

Home of the Culinary Podcast Network

Never trust a woman who doesn't like to eat. She is probably lousy in bed. (attributed to Federico Fellini)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've been enjoy this Frozen Blackberry-Lemon Chiffon Pie I make the other day. Cool and very refreshing!

I was trying to be a little more fancy and use parchment paper around the springform pan, but apparently it buckled and I didn't notice until I went to remove it... so the edges are not as smooth as I hoped!

gallery_51259_4126_101845.jpg


Edited by DesertCulinary (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Its been so long since I've been around, I don't remember if I've posted these or not:

Lemon Bars:

gallery_23736_355_55764.jpg

Caramel Apple Cupcakes:

gallery_23736_355_28710.jpg

Balzano Apple Cake:

gallery_23736_355_45667.jpg

Whoopie Pies:

gallery_23736_355_27290.jpg

Patrick, everything look just Delish!

Any chance you can share the recipe or maybe direct me to a good one, for the whoopie pies?Tha Balzano apple cake looks scrumptios.


Vanessa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vanessa, I'm not Patrick, but there's a decent recipe for whoopie pie from the "Chocolate Obsession" book by Michael Recchiuti. Do you have this book already? If not, pm me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter took me to dinner last night (for a Mom's Day treat ) :wub: at ARTISAN PASO ROBLES and we had an ADELAIDA ICE WINE Ice Cream, Santa Maria strawberries, rhubarb that was awesome ! The ice cream itself was delicious and unusual, but paired with the strawberries and rhubarb was a knockout.

Finished up our ALBAN'S Viognier with it. Yum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks so much! wow no eggs? is that correct? can't wait to try it...

Here it is.  Let me know how it turns out for you.


Pastry PRincess

a day without love, laughter or dessert is a day wasted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By TexasMBA02
      After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online.  After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them.  Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes.  My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get.  I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are.  I was hoping somebody had some insight.  I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all.
       
      This one appears to be older.

       
      And this one appears to be the newer of the two.

       
      Any insight would be helpful.
       
      Thanks,
       
    • By pastrygirl
      Anyone have a favorite recipe for chocolate cake using semisweet chocolate?  My usual chocolate cake recipe uses cocoa, but I have some samples of chocolate I want to use up for a workplace party.  Yes, I could make brownies or ganache frosting, or chocolate mousse or chocolate chunk cookies, just feeling like cake this weekend ...
    • By onemorebitedelara.com
      Has anyone used Valrhona Absolut Crystal neutral glaze particularly to thicken a coulis or to glaze a tart?  If so, how did you like it and is there another glaze you think worked as well but is less expensive or can be purchased in smaller quantities?  
    • By Jaymes
      Red Velvet Cake
      It does use a large amount of oil - 2 cups, but it sure ain't "dry." Red Velvet Cake was very popular back in the late 60's & 70's and there were frequently "Red Velvet Cake cookoffs." This recipe won the blue ribbon at several state fairs.
      2-1/2 c sifted cake flour 2 c sugar 1 c buttermilk 1 tsp soda 1 tsp vanilla 1 tsp salt 3 eggs 2 T cocoa 1 T white vinegar 1 oz red food color 2 C vegetable oil - regular "buttery flavor" is good but, if you can't find it, use 1 Cup Orville Redenbacher Buttery Flavor Oil for Popcorn (available in the popcorn section at the store) and 1 cup regular vegetable oil to make a total of 2C oil Cream cheese frosting:
      1 stick butter 1 tsp vanilla 8-oz pkg cream cheese 1 16-oz bag powdered sugar dash salt 1 c chopped pecans Cake
      Combine all ingredients; mix well and pour into 1 large or two small buttered and floured cake pans. Bake 300º for about 40 minutes, or until done
      Frosting
      Cream well, then frost well-cooled cake. 
      Keywords: Dessert, Cake
      ( RG466 )
    • By pastrygirl
      What do you all think is the safety level of leaving raw shortbread out at warm room temp (75-80f) for 18 hours?  Assume no eggs, just butter, sugar, and flour.... 
       
      It will be baked, but I still fear that pathogens could grow. Or maybe it’s my years of pastry experience wherein cold dough has always been easier to handle and that’s why it seems so wrong. 😂
       
      (This is not my doing, I have a renter in my kitchen.)
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...