Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)


Afterburner
 Share

Recommended Posts

I made a fabulous apple cinnamon crisp last night. My mom gave me her recipe, which was originally for peach crisp (cobbler), but since I can remember we have always substituted apples instead of peaches.

In any case, it came out FABULOUSLY! The apples were cooked perfectly so they were just soft enough but still slightly crunchy. And the crumbly topping was so delicious - right when it came out, I picked a couple of hot little crumbles off the top. YUM :biggrin:

I'd be happy to give anyone the recipe, just PM me!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An almond cake called Balois from the cookbook Perfect Cakes by Nick Malgeri. It turned out very delicious! It was a dense yellow cake made with lots of eggs and lots of almond paste and I brushed it a healthy coating of coffee syrup and then covered it with a thin chocolate ganache and decorated it with a heavier ganache.

balois2.jpg

balois1.jpg

As you can see, hubby got to it before I could get a photograph of the entire cake. :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pears in puff pastry.

Today, at our local "gourmet" grocery(LOL)...I found some pears that were an unusual color, very pale yellow, almost white. The little sticky label called them 'Ya Pears', with no indication of country of origin. They looked very good with no bruising or apparent flaws. Unfortunately, when I got home I found they were extremely hard and with very little taste. Sauteed in sugar and butter and encased with pastry they were o.k, but hardly memorable.

I have the impression that they are an Asian variety because of their placement in the store. Has anyone heard of these, and were they simply unripe?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ya pear

Scientific classification

Kingdom:  Plantae

Division:  Magnoliophyta

Class:  Magnoliopsida

Order:  Rosales

Family:  Rosaceae

Subfamily:  Maloideae

Genus:  Pyrus

Species:  P. bretschneideri

Binomial name

Pyrus bretschneideri

Rehd.

The Chinese White Pear ("bai li") (Pyrus x bretschneideri) is a naturally-occurring interspecific hybrid species of pear native to northern China, where it is widely grown for its edible fruit. These very juicy, white to lightly yellow pears, unlike the round Nashi pears, also grown in eastern Asia, are shaped more like a European Pear with a narrower, elongated base. They taste like a cross between a rose and a pineapple, and are crisp and sweet from the tree. 'Ya Li' is one cultivar widely grown in China, and has been exported to Europe and North America.

from wikipedia. it sounds like it looks european but eats like an asian pear. often (but not always) asian pears that are grown in the united states taste nothing like the same pears grown in asia. a pale imitation if you ask me!

Edited by alanamoana (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today, at our local "gourmet" grocery(LOL)...I found some pears that were an unusual color, very pale yellow, almost white.  The little sticky label called them 'Ya Pears', with no indication of country of origin.

Based on the name, I see these all the time here in Vancouver. Ours are imported from China. It's been awhile since I had any, so no comments on the taste.

Wait, it's coming back to me. The texture and taste resembles the round Asian nashi pears (crisp, like a cross between apple and pear). Shaped like a Bartlett but yellow and smaller?

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

doughgirl - Shiny, shiny delicous cake. Very nice. I was wondering though, what happened to the rest of it? Big family? Does it keep? Or, did you do the ultimate and finish it all?

Thank you! Actually, I have two kiddos (18 months and 5 years) and they are oddly enough, not big dessert eaters. :huh: My 5 year old just scraped off the decoration and ate that, I think she had maybe a tiny bite of the cake. Hubby ate two pieces for dessert and a piece for breakfast this morning and I had a small one for dessert.

It was a pretty rich cake and we had a lot left, but fortunately I have two wonderfully giant brothers that could each eat a horse and they both came over this morning and inhaled what was left. That's usually the way it works. I bake: hubby and I eat a little bit and then my brothers come over and finish it off or I send it home with them. Works for me! It doesn't matter how much I bake, I can bake two cakes and a batch of cookies and have nothing but crumbs left by the next day. :raz:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ya pear

from wikipedia.  it sounds like it looks european but eats like an asian pear.  often (but not always) asian pears that are grown in the united states taste nothing like the same pears grown in asia.  a pale imitation if you ask me!

Thank you for the quick reply. I really must use Wikipedia more often, it didn't occur to me to look. I suspect this was a home grown one as it had hardly any flavor at all, even before I cooked it.

Ted

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is my first post to eGullet after being a long-time lurker and admirer!

I made this cheesecake a few weeks ago - my first one! It's Grapefruit and Ginger Cheesecake, courtesy of a recipe i found on Epicurious.com. Very time consuming to prep but well worth it if you are a fan of ginger. The ginger taste was VERY pronounced. The cheesecake had amazing texture and was just gorgeous!

CCAC.jpg

tami h.

food stylist and food blogger

Running With Tweezers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is my first post to eGullet after being a long-time lurker and admirer!

I made this cheesecake a few weeks ago - my first one! It's Grapefruit and Ginger Cheesecake, courtesy of a recipe i found on Epicurious.com. Very time consuming to prep but well worth it if you are a fan of ginger. The ginger taste was VERY pronounced. The cheesecake had amazing texture and was just gorgeous!

CCAC.jpg

It's a beautiful cake and sounds absolutely delicious!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's been a while since I have posted to this thread - but I do check it out pretty often and some of the things I see just knock me over.

Here is my latest attempt - Pecan Spice Layer Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting from the cover of Gourmet April 2007.

gallery_38003_2183_1034187.jpg

I'll report back once we cut into it.

May life be sweet for you.

Jmahl

The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joe, I absolutely love that picture! Is that just a standard cream cheese frosting?

Thanks!

Pretty much - it is 4 ounces of cream cheese, 3/4 cup confectioners' sugar and just a bit of lemon zest (you can kind of see the wisps of yellow streaking through the first cupcakes)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here it is. This cake is worth making, light, flavorful - wonderful. Suggest that you down load the receipe.

gallery_38003_2183_1411866.jpg

May your life be sweet.

Jmahl

The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today I made Martha Stewart's strawberries and cream cheesecake. It was great. The pictures not so much...

gallery_32986_4389_360569.jpg

gallery_32986_4389_750031.jpg

Rebecca - is this the one that you make with roasted strawberries??? If so, I make that one, too and it is awesome (I am 47 and rarely use that word, but it is correct in this case)!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pears in puff pastry.

Today, at our local "gourmet" grocery(LOL)...I found some pears that were an unusual color, very pale yellow, almost white.  The little sticky label called them 'Ya Pears', with no indication of country of origin.  They looked very good with no bruising or apparent flaws.  Unfortunately, when I got home I found they were extremely hard and with very little taste. Sauteed in sugar and butter and encased with pastry they were o.k, but hardly memorable.

I have the impression that they are an Asian variety because of their placement in the store. Has anyone heard of these, and were they simply unripe?

Disclosure: Ted is my dad. I will have to show you how to post your photos here - that way you could show a photo of the hard little pear, too!

Ted is going to Europe in a couple of weeks. Take plenty of pictures so that you can do a report when you come back! I know I will want to see that. He's a great writer (brag, brag)!

Kim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My April Fool's food...

Potato Chips and Dip

crinklecookie1.jpg

Actually it is a sugar cookie with white chocolate mousse made on creased parchment paper.

crinklecookie2.jpg

And while not a dessert, this one was fun too:

savorycupcake.jpg

Savory herb cupcakes with red pepper or broccoli cream cheese spread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By cteavin
      I posted this on YouTube the other day and thought I'd post it here. Personally, when I make them for me I only use Erythritol (a sugar substitute) but depending on the friend sugar or a blend of the two. Unlike other zucchini brownies, these don't use egg white, so they're not cake-y, but dense and fudgy. 
       
      Oh, and because I use whey protein, they're higher in protein and good for post-workout bite. 
       
       
      Ingredients
      300 -400 grams zucchini 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup sugar or sugar substitute 1/2 cup cocoa 1-2 tablespoons flavoring (brandy, rum, vanilla, etc) 2 shots of espresso (or instant, 60ml/2oz) 2 egg yolks 1/2 cup flour 1/2 cup oatmeal 1 cup whey protein (or milk powder) 1 teaspoon cinnamon (optional, but adds nice flavor)   1. Mince the zucchini in the food processor with the salt.
      2. Add the sugar or sugar substitute and process until the sugar is dissolved.
      3. Bloom your cocoa: In a separate bowl, combine the cocoa with HOT espresso and your flavorings (including cinnamon). Stir until mostly dissolved.
      4. To the food processor add the cocoa mixture and two egg yolks and blend together.
      5. Add the whey protein or milk powder to the mixture and blend together.
      6. Add the oatmeal and blend.
      7. Add the flour and pulse to incorporate (in other words, try not to over mix).
      8. Pour into a brownie pan and bake for 20-30 minutes at 180C/350F
    • By artiesel
      Has anyone successfully made candied chestnuts (marrons glace) at home which even remotely resemble the professional ones you get from Europe?
       
      I've tried making them using RTE Chinese chestnuts from Costco with varying success:
      One batch became leathery after being simmered in (what started out as) simple syrup which had its sucrose concentration gradually increased.
       
      I have also tried soaking the chestnuts in hot water prior to beginning the candying process.  The nuts, once again, developed a tough skin after a few days.  To reverse the tough skins I added more water to the syrup, broke the nuts up into pieces and simmered them gently for a few hours.
      While some pieces have a tough skin, many of them have taken on a candied texture.
       
      Should any further attempts to candy chestnuts be attempted using the method of slowly simmering them in simple syrup?
       
      Please share any feedback ypu may have.  Thanks!
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By Darienne
      In hopes of sleeping better, etc, etc, I have currently given up gluten, dairy and now sugar.  The gluten and dairy pose no problems...the sugar does.  I am not happy using mannitol or erythritol or any of those artificial sweeteners...they give me severe digestive problems.   But I can tolerate stevia very nicely.  The only problem is that there doesn't seem to be much sweetened with this ingredient.
       
      I do have a carob/coconut oil/peanut butter/stevia candy of sorts.  I don't really like it all that much, but it does work.  That's about it.
       
      Has anyone any recipes for desserts using stevia?  Thanks.
    • By Janet Taylor
      Ever since Todd talked making cupcakes I have been cupcake crazy. Although, I am not a cake maker but more of a pie person.
      My first dessert that I love that I make is my Coconut Cream Pie w/heavy whipped cream. I don't use low fat anything and probably angioplasties is necessary after this baby.
      My second is Peach Cobbler w/rich vanilla ice cream. I never met a cobbler that I didn't like, but peach is my favorite.
      I don't make these often because I wouldn't be able to get through the front door if I did.
      How about yours?
      .....Janet
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...