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Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)


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Blackberry brown sugar cake, from September's Gourmet.

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Blackberries and blackberry jam up top, orange/brown sugar cake layers, and brown sugar buttercream. Super-tasty!

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Blackberry brown sugar cake, from September's Gourmet.

gallery_26775_1623_66198.jpg

Blackberries and blackberry jam up top, orange/brown sugar cake layers, and brown sugar buttercream.  Super-tasty!

Note to self: Go get Sept. Gourmet! That cake is gorgeous, Meg! I want to make that!

Thanks, everyone for the kind words. Shaloop's cheesecake was truly amazing - tasted fantastic, easy to make (and to make pretty :wink:) and it cut beautifully!

Ann_T, that pie is lovely - makes me want to go pick apples (will have to wait a few weeks for the good stuff).

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^Me too. I find spice cakes very forgiving...you could fiddle with the amount of spices as you wish, until the batter tastes good to you. :smile: Be sure to check the cake as it's baking as all ovens (and loaf pans) are different!

Today I had...

-a banana ice-cream bar

-a melon ice-cream bar (we had both in the freezer, why choose one flavour when you can have both?)

-a caramel Reese's cup (so sweet it made my throat itch)

-a Max 5 bar (it has pretzels, peanut butter, chocolate, and nuts. Sounds better than it tasted.)

-the last red bean pastry

...and...too much brownie batter. :shock:

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Ling, I noticed the change in your sig line. Is Shanghai Wind in Canada or Washington? I looooovve turnip cakes (of all kinds). Is the one you're referring to the kind that is shredded with a bit of ham and flaky pastry wrapped around it with sesame seeds on top? Or is it luobo gao? Gotta save up information for when we can make a trip up to your neck of the woods.

Sorry this was off topic!

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I had fun with this one. I'm always looking for new dessert plates/containers and Bodum's new stemless glasswear is great! This is their new champagne glass. Inside is Peach Coulis sandwiched between thick almond milk cream, topped in spun sugar fans. This was based on a recipe in the May 06 Pastrys Best.

cocktails2.jpg

And here's the play shot...

cocktail1.jpg

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Ling, I noticed the change in your sig line.  Is Shanghai Wind in Canada or Washington?  I looooovve turnip cakes (of all kinds).  Is the one you're referring to the kind that is shredded with a bit of ham and flaky pastry wrapped around it with sesame seeds on top?  Or is it luobo gao?  Gotta save up information for when we can make a trip up to your neck of the woods.

Sorry this was off topic!

Yes, on the menu it says "turnip cake" but it's actually the flaky pastry with the shredded daikon and bits of meat inside. Soooo good. Shanghai Wind is in Richmond (suburb of Vancouver.) Let me know when you're in town! :smile:

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This was my contribution a couple weeks back to a bbq that I was unable to attend on Saturday. A moist two-layer carrot cake w/ pineapples, coconut, and walnuts. I received a call that night while at work letting me the cake was great, I have to admit it turned out pretty good for a rookie.

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This was my contribution a couple weeks back to a bbq that I was unable to attend on Saturday. A moist two-layer carrot cake w/ pineapples, coconut, and walnuts. I received a call that night while at work letting me the cake was great, I have to admit it turned out pretty good for a rookie.

gallery_38570_2980_56988.jpg

gallery_38570_2980_18911.jpg

gallery_38570_2980_22197.jpg

Looks great!

Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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I had fun with this one.  I'm always looking for new dessert plates/containers and Bodum's new stemless glasswear is great!  This is their new champagne glass.  Inside is Peach Coulis sandwiched between thick almond milk cream, topped in spun sugar fans.  This was based on a recipe in the May 06 Pastrys Best.

cocktails2.jpg

And here's the play shot...

cocktail1.jpg

Wow! That is truly impressive. Whatever the kids are saying now that means "off the hook" :wink: ! How hard were those fans to do? And how long before serving did you put them in the dessert?

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Oh my. One of my favourite dessert pics yet, gfron! That's gorgeous!

I made apple pie today...experimented with using a tiny bit of baking soda in with my pie crust recipe (which contains a tiny bit of vinegar). And I always use lard in my pie crusts. :wink: Filling is made with Honeycrisp apples and Granny Smith.

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Wow!  That is truly impressive.  Whatever the kids are saying now that means "off the hook"  :wink: !  How hard were those fans to do?  And how long before serving did you put them in the dessert?

Thanks guys...I was getting worried when no one replied earlier (my ego is so sensitive). The fans were actually very easy. I carmelized sugar (with a pinch of tartar) and drizzled it on a greased base from a tart pan (round), then wishing I had gloves on I pinched the base to make the fan. Once cooled I pulled them off for serving. I put them in the dessert right before serving in case the sugar dissolved in the cream.

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Ling, I noticed the change in your sig line.  Is Shanghai Wind in Canada or Washington?  I looooovve turnip cakes (of all kinds).  Is the one you're referring to the kind that is shredded with a bit of ham and flaky pastry wrapped around it with sesame seeds on top?  Or is it luobo gao?  Gotta save up information for when we can make a trip up to your neck of the woods.

Sorry this was off topic!

Yes, on the menu it says "turnip cake" but it's actually the flaky pastry with the shredded daikon and bits of meat inside. Soooo good. Shanghai Wind is in Richmond (suburb of Vancouver.) Let me know when you're in town! :smile:

ling, be careful what you ask for...i may just plan it on a henry weekend so that i can experience the iron chef style meals that you both prepare for your friends and families!!! :raz:

by the way, beautiful apple pie. i'm going to have to try your baking soda tip. do you use leaf lard like phlawless (i think it is phlawless) does?

gfron1 that's just a gorgeous dessert and sounds delicious. might be really good served with a couple of amaretti or macarons on the side to give some crunch!

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I had fun with this one.  I'm always looking for new dessert plates/containers and Bodum's new stemless glasswear is great!  This is their new champagne glass.  Inside is Peach Coulis sandwiched between thick almond milk cream, topped in spun sugar fans.  This was based on a recipe in the May 06 Pastrys Best.

cocktails2.jpg

And here's the play shot...

cocktail1.jpg

Very cool! Those look really elegant, and refreshing.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Gfron, I echo the sentiments already expressed - those are striking. They remind me that I need to learn how to do sugar.

D90, I don't think you can really call yourself a rookie. You finshed that cake really beautifully.

Lorna, gorgeous. How are Honeycrisps in pie, not too juicy? That's my current favorite eating apple.

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This is Toby's Buttermilk Chocolate Fudge Cake finished with Scharffen Berger's Deep Chocolate Glaze. I used the 99% unsweetened SB for the cake, and the 62% SB semisweet for the glaze. It was very wham! pow! chocolate, better the second day when the acidity of the chocolate seemed a bit tamer and the fruitier notes emerged more. Very adult, and needs to be served with whipped cream to lighten the experience.

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Alana: We'd both be happy to cook for you anytime you decide to visit! :smile:

The baking soda tip I learned on EG...I forget which poster wrote about it, but I think it was mentioned in a cookbook. I used about 1/4 tsp for the amount of dough needed for one double-crusted pie, and there is 1/2 tsp. of vinegar in the dough to activate it.

I wish I could find a source for leaf lard in my city! I have gone to a few butchers in Richmond and they don't carry leaf lard. I could probably find some in Seattle...in fact, I know you can get it at a farmer's market down there. So for now, I'm using Tenderflake. I have not seen this in Seattle (looked for it when I wanted to make a pie) but it's acceptable, non-hydrogenated lard.

Lorna, gorgeous.  How are Honeycrisps in pie, not too juicy?  That's my current favorite eating apple.

Honeycrisps are my favourite eating apple too! I started seeing them in Richmond perhaps two years ago, but the stuff they were selling was really expensive and had bruises. A few days ago, I found them at a market and they looked good, so I bought one to try and it was so tasty I had to go back and get some for the pie.

The Honeycrisps were actually very juicy in the pie. The filling is actually a little runnier than I expected it to be. I cooked the filling until medium-firm on the stovetop (7-8 minutes) and reduced the sauce with tapioca starch (which I haven't used before) and I guess I didn't use enough tapioca starch. I think I'll go back to using cornstarch as pie thickener.

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I wish I could find a source for leaf lard in my city! I have gone to a few butchers in Richmond and they don't carry leaf lard. I could probably find some in Seattle...in fact, I know you can get it at a farmer's market down there. So for now, I'm using Tenderflake. I have not seen this in Seattle (looked for it when I wanted to make a pie) but it's acceptable, non-hydrogenated lard.

Lorna

As far as I know there isn't even a source in Seattle for leaf lard. (I don't consider a farmer's market a dependable source). I get mine from Dietrich's Meats in Pennsylvania. I've got 25 pounds of the stuff in my freezer right now. In fact, if you want some, I'll be glad to ship you some of mine. I could use a little more room in my freezer.....got a little overzealous in the ordering department! :raz: I could be the spokesmodel for leaf lard I love it so much....I can't say enough good things about it.

In fact, last Sunday's Seattle Times pull-out magazine, "Pretentious Northwest", had a recipe for "LardSnaps". Did anyone see it? In the article, Dietrich's Meats was mentioned. Also, we tried making them at work on Wednesday......they're GREAT!!!!!!

So, for anyone that wants the info on Dietrich's......

Their number is: 610-756-6344

Their address is: 660 Old 22, Lenhartsville, PA 19534

Their ordering process is rather old fashioned. You have to call and order. They give you the total, and you have to send them a check or money order for the amount. Make sure you include your order number on the check. Then they send you the lard. Maybe when they keep getting slammed for the lard everytime an article comes out on them, they will start accepting credit cards......God, I hope so. :wacko:

Edited by chefpeon (log)
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The Honeycrisps were actually very juicy in the pie. The filling is actually a little runnier than I expected it to be. I cooked the filling until medium-firm on the stovetop (7-8 minutes) and reduced the sauce with tapioca starch (which I haven't used before) and I guess I didn't use enough tapioca starch. I think I'll go back to using cornstarch as pie thickener.

I've found potato starch works great in pies. I read about it in Baking Illustrated and have used it ever since. Not gummy or gooey looking but firms up pies nicely.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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I've found potato starch works great in pies. I read about it in Baking Illustrated and have used it ever since. Not gummy or gooey looking but firms up pies nicely.

My mother swears by potato starch and uses it to thicken everything - she even makes glazes with it. Much better results than corn starch.

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In fact, last Sunday's Seattle Times pull-out magazine, "Pretentious Northwest", had a recipe for "LardSnaps". Did anyone see it?

I saw that! I was thinking that whoever wanted chewy, not cakey pumpkin cookies might be able to word off that recipe. But I couldn't remember who wanted the cookies, and couldn't figure out how to put pumpkin in it. (I'm a recipe follower, not a creator, I admit it!)

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I've found potato starch works great in pies. I read about it in Baking Illustrated and have used it ever since. Not gummy or gooey looking but firms up pies nicely.

My mother swears by potato starch and uses it to thicken everything - she even makes glazes with it. Much better results than corn starch.

Pam, if I wanted to use potato starch as thickener instead of cornstarch, would it usually be a straightforward 1-to-1 substitution?

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