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Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)

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Dorie Greenspan's Tourteau De Chèvre. I have a batch of molecular lemon curd to accompany it.

Kerry, that looks quite interesting. Did you try a slice?

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Dorie Greenspan's Tourteau De Chèvre. I have a batch of molecular lemon curd to accompany it.

Kerry, that looks quite interesting. Did you try a slice?

Not yet - though I did the last time I made it - lovely - not too sweet.

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Kudos for realizing the V8 cake at home, nice job!

Teo


Teo

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Incredible cake, jmacnaughtan, and welcome to eGullet.

I'm curious about the source of the pressure to make this labor-intensive, time-consuming, etc, cake. Internal? External? Job-related?


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I'm curious about the source of the pressure to make this labor-intensive, time-consuming, etc, cake. Internal? External? Job-related?

Internal, mostly. I'd watched the masterchef challenge, seen the recipe and said to my girlfriend that it didn't seem too hard.

20 minutes later it was announced to all our friends, who immediately wanted to come and try it. Well, you can't lose face after that...

Btw, I don't recommend tempering white chocolate when it's a steady 30°C at home. So many headaches.

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I'm curious about the source of the pressure to make this labor-intensive, time-consuming, etc, cake. Internal? External? Job-related?

Internal, mostly. I'd watched the masterchef challenge, seen the recipe and said to my girlfriend that it didn't seem too hard.

20 minutes later it was announced to all our friends, who immediately wanted to come and try it. Well, you can't lose face after that...

Btw, I don't recommend tempering white chocolate when it's a steady 30°C at home. So many headaches.

Yeah, tempering white chocolate at 30º C is nigh on impossible! Did you cool it over ice water?

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Technical difficulties today. This is David Lebovitz's Fresh Ginger Cake. It is thoroughly stuck to the pan, sides and bottom. Fortunately the bottom is enamelled so I don't thing they'll damage it cutting the cake.

I'm not ready to blame the recipe - I've had one of those days where I'm dropping everything and screwing up everything - so I'm assuming it's me. Next time I will parchment the pan. I'm a little worried with the dropsy however as I'm on call in emerg today and not sure how much damage I might do!

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Yeah, tempering white chocolate at 30º C is nigh on impossible! Did you cool it over ice water?

No, I just stuck it in the fridge for 10 seconds at a time. An ice bath would probably have been a better idea- I didn't quite get the "snap" I was hoping for. It held its shape though... It's the first time I've tempered white chocolate- does it get the same snap as dark?

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Yeah, tempering white chocolate at 30º C is nigh on impossible! Did you cool it over ice water?

No, I just stuck it in the fridge for 10 seconds at a time. An ice bath would probably have been a better idea- I didn't quite get the "snap" I was hoping for. It held its shape though... It's the first time I've tempered white chocolate- does it get the same snap as dark?

Nope - all that milk fat prevents the same sort of snap you get with dark. The best you'll get is good retraction from molds and no streaks.

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Still working on portugese almond tarts - haven't perfected them yet. But these will do for rounds this morning. There are a dozen eggs in these two little trays.

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Fig, port and almond tart adapted from the the Prune Almond Tart from the River Cafe. Makes way to much filling which of course bubbled over and made removal from the tart pan a challenge.

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That panettone is a marvel, Justin! I can only imagine the aroma it must have spread through your kitchen...

And Kerry, a lot of delicious sounding things coming from your oven as well... that fig port almond tart looks unassuming but I'd welcome a slice with my cuppa right now!

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That panettone is a marvel, Justin! I can only imagine the aroma it must have spread through your kitchen...

And Kerry, a lot of delicious sounding things coming from your oven as well... that fig port almond tart looks unassuming but I'd welcome a slice with my cuppa right now!

I'm loving the look of that panettone too.

Fig tart was quite sweet and was totally gone about an hour after I got to work. They keep threatening to chain me and not let me go home at the end of the week.

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Made Brooke Dojny's Blueberry Snack Cake with Toasted Pecan Topping as agreed.

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http://food52.com/re...d_pecan_topping from Food52, but segued into muffins.

Two errors (will the errors never end? :raz: ) : made 12 large muffins...should have made 14; used frozen blueberries...yes, but from frozen. Idiote.

Delicious. Another round of muffins for the Annual Dog Weekend!


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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jmacnaughtan this is very nice work! Decoration is just amazing. I like minimalistic decorations for cakes, but all depends on occasion.


"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

Franchise Takeaway

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jmacnaughtan this is very nice work! Decoration is just amazing. I like minimalistic decorations for cakes, but all depends on occasion.

Thanks. I'm pretty much against most cake decorations too- either they're pointless and add nothing, or they're good and only one person can eat it. I like this because it adds no new component to the cake, doesn't dominate it and it tastes good.

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Internal, mostly. I'd watched the masterchef challenge, seen the recipe and said to my girlfriend that it didn't seem too hard.

OMG I did exactly the same thing with the season 1 Croquembouche, my wife turned around and said "Well, you can make it for my birthday"

so I did, and it wasn't :D

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Internal, mostly. I'd watched the masterchef challenge, seen the recipe and said to my girlfriend that it didn't seem too hard.

OMG I did exactly the same thing with the season 1 Croquembouche, my wife turned around and said "Well, you can make it for my birthday"

so I did, and it wasn't :D

I've been eyeing that for a while, it's a nice showpiece. Did you pull off all the spun sugar? I'd like to see the photos...

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jmacnaughtan this is very nice work! Decoration is just amazing. I like minimalistic decorations for cakes, but all depends on occasion.

Thanks. I'm pretty much against most cake decorations too- either they're pointless and add nothing, or they're good and only one person can eat it. I like this because it adds no new component to the cake, doesn't dominate it and it tastes good.

You 're welcome!

I like decoration but with style if you understand me. I like your style and there are many good on the forum i see. There is awesome food in "Dinner" thread, i saw there so many good decorations.


"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

Franchise Takeaway

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Recipe test...

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Johnny Iuzzini's no-bake cheesecake. He did it with rhubarb, I did it with raspberry... I think pretty much any fruit will work. The pre-fried stage has great flavor but I wasn't completely thrilled with the texture. That didn't worry me, frying and serving warm is part of the dish, but it did start me thinking about ways to modify it if I wanted to use it in a cold setting. Shouldn't take much adjusting. Once breaded and fried, the interior is soft and creamy and much more pleasant to eat (in my opinion). Just for the record, he molds them in spheres and serves them on a lollipop stick with a dab of a fruit gel on top. I wasn't going for replicating the dish, just wanted to see if the base itself was something I might be interested in playing around with. Anyway, been meaning to check this one out for a long time and finally got around to it.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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That looks really neat - what is the gelling agent?

.7% Iota + .35% kappa carrageenans and .22% agar in a base of 1 part cream cheese, 1 part fruit puree, .5 part water and .2 part sugar. Gums combined with the sugar. Thermomix water and cream cheese with heat, add sugar/gums, heat to 190 f, add fruit puree, heat to boil, pour in mold/molds and chill. I can't afford a thermomix and we don't have one at work either so I improvised. It would be less mess with a thermomix but it's easily doable without. I just heated the water and cream cheese, dumped it in a blender and pureed smooth, blended in the sugar/gums, dumped it back in the pot, heated to 190 f, whisked in the puree and heated to boiling. If it's going to be set in individual molds, you have to have them ready to go. It starts setting up pretty quickly.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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