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Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)


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A cake I made this weekend for a BD at Mr. Kim’s office:

med_gallery_3331_114_206971.jpg

Lemonade Layer Cake. Don’t know where I got the recipe, but I wasn’t thrilled with it. The cake was too dense and heavy and the cream cheese icing was overly buttery and wasn’t very lemony.

Slice:

med_gallery_3331_114_204882.jpg

I may give the layers another chance in case I overbeat the batter or something, and use a different icing recipe.

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Kim, that lemon cake is so pretty!

Chocolot, adorable ladybirds!

I want to make a spicy hot hot hot hot hard candy for a friend,and could use some advice.

Last night I did a first quick and dirty trial run:

melted sugar, added chili oil & a bit of vinegar, made lozenges by dropping the mix onto foil.

It worked ok - they have a definite burn and arent super sweet.

But, they arent as fiery spicy as desired, and the oil is extracting itself from the lozenges.

I'd rather not be contaminating peoples fingers with super spicy oil.

(and it turns out the oil I used includes onion in the making. Onion is quite clear in the candies. Oops.)

Any suggestions on the best way to get that hot spicy flavor into the candy? Can it be extracted into vinegar or?

thanks

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Any suggestions on the best way to get that hot spicy flavor into the candy? Can it be extracted into vinegar or?

thanks

Capsaicin extract or an extract-based sauce from any place stocking super-hot hot sauces would add a serious heat kick as long as it had a flavor profile you were okay with (many of the non-sauce extracts are in an oil base but there would be so little necessary that oil leaching out may not be an issue). If you wanted to keep it simple, you could puree some habaneros (or bhut jolokia if you can find them) in water, strain and use that liquid as your water base in the candy. I've had habanero lollipops that were plenty hot enough for the average chile head but if you're really trying to melt someone's face, they may not be enough on their own. The ghost chiles might be. The right extract or extract sauce definitely would.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Kouign Aman, I would stay away from extracts and oils that have been infused with chili, its hard to get alot of flavor with extracts in a hard candy without adding the additional unwanted water, and as for your oil, its sort of hard to tell what it was, I assume it was a cooking oil infused with chilies, in which case you would have to use a large amount of oil to get a nice flavor. Start off with a hard candy recipe, the one in Chocolates and Confections works wonderful, PM me if you want it. Then I'd get a pure chili oil from LorAnn Oils, like this one: https://www.lorannoils.com/p-8374-hot-chili-natural.aspx

This will give you your hot hot hot hot hard candy. I'm not sure if your really into sugar pulling or anything, but you could make a rather awesome looking hard candy with yellow, orange, and red stripes. Otherwise, boil the candy, wait for it to cool down a little, add your chili oil, perhaps add some red color, and drop your lozenges, and watch your friend suffer. Alternatively, you could make little berlingots type candies by pouring the candy on a slab or silpat, waiting for it to cool until it holds its shape, and pulling it in a rope and cutting little drops, or make your friend a lollipop!

Additionally, stay away from vinegar, you really dont need it in hard candy, aside from the oil you added your first try, this would have contributed to making the candy a little stickier. You can use some cream of tartar, it makes the candy a little easier to handle of your doing pulling, but will shorten the shelf life. If your simply dropping or pouring the sugar to make drops, you dont need an acid.

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Tri2Cook and minas6907, thanks for the recommendations and ideas.

This first try, I used about 2 tsp of the oil from a chinese condiment that is mashed peppers, oil (and apparently onions), with 2T sugar. Its good and hot, just not hot enough.

My friend wont suffer. She'll enjoy it. I'll know its finally spicy enough when I suffer. QC is gonna be ... interesting.

I'll post if I do more work on this idea.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Mette, the cake is so pretty!

I think I may request marzipan to 'frost' my next bday cake.

Cayenne if I can pull the heat out, but I dont want the grit of the powdered peppers in the candy itself.

I started w powdered cayenne, but the capsaicin didnt extract into water well (no real surprise).

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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You could load up the water used for the hard candy recipe with the Cayenne and bring to a boil to steep, then proceed to make the candy after straining it out. One advantage, I'd say, to using the concentrated oil is that its folded in as the candy is cooling, you dont have to boil it so your kitchen wont smell of Cayenne for days.

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Yesterday's birthday cake: classic devil's food cake layers and chocolate cream frosting (both from The Best Recipe), ginger preserve filling. The layers and frosting included black pepper, cloves, smoked salt, and vanilla bean to round out the chocolate flavour, and the Mackay's spiced ginger preserves were brightened with a bit of citric acid (I moistened the two layers with a bit of Borghetti before filling and icing).

KristofferBirthdayCake 2012-04-23 at 11.32.18.png

(The ridiculously illegible mysterious inscription on the cake is my boyfriend's name... no, neither of us is a tween girl, why do you ask? :rolleyes: )

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Pretty pastel stars.

The munchkin was given silicon cake pans with what I thought was an insane level of detail that would never survive baking. Nice to be wrong! Lemon cake with lemon glaze:

LemonCakeGirl 2012-Mar.jpg

This is one of the chili-oil drop candies from above. I've got dried chilies waiting to be extracted for round 2.

ChiliDrop 2012-Mar.jpg

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Not the most flattering of plating but all the flavors fit with the PB&J theme that was requested. It's chocolate cake, peanut butter cream, salted caramel and cubes of strawberry and port.

Sounds tasty and looks good to me. PB&J is a theme that, in my opinion anyway, needs to have the components in close proximity. A PB&J sandwich wouldn't be the same with a bite of peanut butter here, a bite of jelly there. It needs to be all smashed together in the bread to do it's magic. Your dessert can be eaten in similar manner, some of everything in each bite... just like a good PB&J. Since that's what was requested, it's perfect. I don't think everything requires fussy arrangements.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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