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Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)


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i long ago lost the ability to look at any foliage without wondering what it would look like in chocolate.  andy goldsworthy's work fascinates me (if you're not familiar, go rent rivers and tides), and i was inspired to make this based on his 'black hole' creations:

            gallery_8512_4054_386798.jpg

Beautiful, amazing work - so much love and patience.

Rivers and Tides is my favorite movie, I must have watched it literally dozens of times, and can't wait to get home and find my DVD and watch it some more! So soothing after a long day in the kitchen - when he's pinning the twigs together in a lattice and a gust of wind comes along and destroys it or the pile of beach stone collapses and he just sort of sighs and says 'this is my work', or working with the bracken 'I always associate this material with bleeding hands' - those moments so relate to cooking for me, the things you do because you are driven to do them, even though they are painful and frustrating while you are doing them, the end result is worth it.

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Thank you for the kind words about the 'cupcake' - I'm planning on making a trio for Mother's day dinner. I don't have a thing to contribute today (I made mix brownies for a party at Mr. Kim's office on Monday :biggrin: ), but I HAVE to comment. This thread and the Dinner thread are what I show people who are curious about where I spend my time online (those and the late and greatly lamented blogs, of course :sad: ). What you folks accomplish here just drops jaws and then shuts mouths!

hansjoakim - both of those cakes are just stunning and I am so jealous of how perfect those strawberries look!

Ann - my MIL made us a rhubarb pie just recently and it was wonderful. I hadn't ever had a JUST rhubarb pie, always rhubarb and strawberry and I was surprised at how much I liked it.

Ilana - fudge is a dividing line in this country. Some folks like it soft and creamy (me), others like it a little dry and not-too-sweet (Mr. Kim) - we say we have a mixed marriage. I can give you recipes for the creamy kind, but seeing your lovely confections, I'm not sure they would be your 'cup of tea' - they really are just unsophisticated sweet goo. And I have never had any success with the other kind.

dystopiandreamgirl - I just have no words - Ilana took them all! Just achingly lovely work. What an immense amount of love you put in your work - and thank you so much for the introduction to Goldsworthy - your desserts certainly share the serenity that is seen in his work.

Pilori - the truffles looks scrumptious!

DeliciouslyLekker - beautiful cake and wonderful photography!

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A giant cupcake that I made for a friend to give to her cupcake-crazy gentleman friend:

gallery_3331_119_23510.jpg

The coffee cup is for scale.  It was, by request, German chocolate.  Adorable and came out of the pan very easily, as I was afraid that it would not.  I can't wait to try it out in a yellow or white cake with pastel frosting and some cute decorations.

Kim, that is one amazing cupcake.

My favourite - first rhubarb pie of the season.

gallery_27944_2966_294556.jpg

And homemade Walnut and White Chocolate Fudge

gallery_27944_2966_123001.jpg

What recipe did you use? I going to attempt to make a rhubarb pie. Never tried it before.

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Kim Shook! If you don't mind I would LOVE a recipe! Once this lady who makes gluten- free goods from her home told me she had made fudge. I bought some and they were just dense brownies. She told me that they were "fudge like in America!" Hah!

Your confections/pastries are totally great and that fudge looks intriguing- who knows it may be that you will shake my town with fudge! I am sure it will be a treat for my family to taste some.

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Kim Shook! If you don't mind I would LOVE a recipe! Once this lady who makes gluten- free goods from her home told me she had made fudge. I bought some and they were just dense brownies. She told me that they were "fudge like in America!" Hah!

Your confections/pastries are totally great and that fudge looks intriguing- who knows it may be that you will shake my town with fudge! I am sure it will be a treat for my family to taste some.

I'll be glad to share! Here are three of my favorites:

Aunt San's Fudge This is just a classic creamy milk chocolate fudge (I've also made it with dark chocolate, too). It's the one that my great aunt started making as a young girl - she hated that WWI interrupted her fudge making - all the Hershey bars were gone! Apparently fudge making was an important part of a young ladies social life in those days!

Chefette's Fudge Our own chefette sent me this recipe when I was lamenting the cruddy fudge that I was trying to make according to Shook family tradition. It is wonderful - rich and dark and complex, but not bitter at all (that was the lamentable part of the Shook fudge :wink: ).

Cherry-Almond Dark Chocolate Fudge

Let me know if you like these at all! They are VERY American, I understand :biggrin: .

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Kim Shook! If you don't mind I would LOVE a recipe! Once this lady who makes gluten- free goods from her home told me she had made fudge. I bought some and they were just dense brownies. She told me that they were "fudge like in America!" Hah!

Your confections/pastries are totally great and that fudge looks intriguing- who knows it may be that you will shake my town with fudge! I am sure it will be a treat for my family to taste some.

I'll be glad to share! Here are three of my favorites:

Aunt San's Fudge This is just a classic creamy milk chocolate fudge (I've also made it with dark chocolate, too). It's the one that my great aunt started making as a young girl - she hated that WWI interrupted her fudge making - all the Hershey bars were gone! Apparently fudge making was an important part of a young ladies social life in those days!

Chefette's Fudge Our own chefette sent me this recipe when I was lamenting the cruddy fudge that I was trying to make according to Shook family tradition. It is wonderful - rich and dark and complex, but not bitter at all (that was the lamentable part of the Shook fudge :wink: ).

Cherry-Almond Dark Chocolate Fudge

Let me know if you like these at all! They are VERY American, I understand :biggrin: .

So Kim - do you have a recipe for the type that Mr Kim likes that is less sweet? That's what I'm always in search of.

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Chefette's Fudge Our own chefette sent me this recipe when I was lamenting the cruddy fudge that I was trying to make according to Shook family tradition. It is wonderful - rich and dark and complex, but not bitter at all (that was the lamentable part of the Shook fudge  ).

I took this recipe from Kim's website back in December when I got an order for fudge. It was really good and the client was very happy with it. I used that New World Chocolate from Tomric. I didnt think it was too sweet( even though there is a ton of sugar in it).

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Kim Shook! If you don't mind I would LOVE a recipe! Once this lady who makes gluten- free goods from her home told me she had made fudge. I bought some and they were just dense brownies. She told me that they were "fudge like in America!" Hah!

Your confections/pastries are totally great and that fudge looks intriguing- who knows it may be that you will shake my town with fudge! I am sure it will be a treat for my family to taste some.

I'll be glad to share! Here are three of my favorites:

Aunt San's Fudge This is just a classic creamy milk chocolate fudge (I've also made it with dark chocolate, too). It's the one that my great aunt started making as a young girl - she hated that WWI interrupted her fudge making - all the Hershey bars were gone! Apparently fudge making was an important part of a young ladies social life in those days!

Chefette's Fudge Our own chefette sent me this recipe when I was lamenting the cruddy fudge that I was trying to make according to Shook family tradition. It is wonderful - rich and dark and complex, but not bitter at all (that was the lamentable part of the Shook fudge :wink: ).

Cherry-Almond Dark Chocolate Fudge

Let me know if you like these at all! They are VERY American, I understand :biggrin: .

So Kim - do you have a recipe for the type that Mr Kim likes that is less sweet? That's what I'm always in search of.

Well,sorta :rolleyes:. If you read all my notes and the update, I haven't really mastered it yet. If you try and have success, PLEASE let me know. I find this stuff so frustrating that I have given up. Everyone in Mr. Kim's family just tosses it off with no trouble - I'm convinced they are hiding something from me :biggrin: !

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So Kim - do you have a recipe for the type that Mr Kim likes that is less sweet?  That's what I'm always in search of.

Well,sorta :rolleyes:. If you read all my notes and the update, I haven't really mastered it yet. If you try and have success, PLEASE let me know. I find this stuff so frustrating that I have given up. Everyone in Mr. Kim's family just tosses it off with no trouble - I'm convinced they are hiding something from me :biggrin: !

That looks a lot like the recipe I used to make when I was a kid - if you are having trouble with it - perhaps you might try cooling before you start beating. From memory - you cook to soft ball, add the butter and vanilla on top as it cools (don't mix in), once it's really cool (I had trouble waiting as a kid - so it was often grainy) start beating until it starts to thicken.

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My favourite - first rhubarb pie of the season.

gallery_27944_2966_294556.jpg

Just had to report here that after Ann graciously posted the recipe for this pie on recipe gullet, I made it last night and brought it to a party... FANTASTIC. Big hit. I was skeptical on the custard, but in fact it was just perfect -- cooling the tang of the rhubarb just right. Next time I may add a smidge of orange zest, which I thought would taste good with the rhubarb...

Thanks Ann!

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These are some new Petits Fours that we did for a Customer today... :-)

cheers

t.

Abolutely gorgeous! Are you able to say how much you charge for them?

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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My Summer Citrus Sensation

Yeah, I bought a new mold :)

Calamansi mousse with fresh blueberries inside, sprayed with white chocolate.

Are calamansi the same as calamondin oranges? If they are, could you post your calamansi mousse recipe. I have a calamondin orange tree that makes lots and lots of oranges and I've never known what to do with them.

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My Summer Citrus Sensation

Yeah, I bought a new mold :)

Calamansi mousse with fresh blueberries inside, sprayed with white chocolate.

Are calamansi the same as calamondin oranges? If they are, could you post your calamansi mousse recipe. I have a calamondin orange tree that makes lots and lots of oranges and I've never known what to do with them.

Make a lemonade-like beverage! That's the best!

You can pretty much use them in anything you'd use lemons or limes, but you may have to adjust sugar content in desserts. I wanted to try calamansi pie while I was in the Philippines, but didn't find any. Great with fish, especially grilled/fried fish--just squeeze it on, or make a ponzu-type of sauce.

I love calamansi!

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