Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Afterburner

Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)

Recommended Posts

Kim:

Thank you for the nice compliment. The easy answer to your question is yes, they are White Jimmies. The difficult part of that answer is that I bought them (under a different "name" from Callebaut Chocolate) I was going to put white chocolate curls on the top, but ran out of time and thought those would "work".

Thanks again

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joe – that coffee cake looks gorgeous and I am joining the amazement at your perfect and beautiful graham crackers.  I love graham crackers (even the boxed ones are ok if they are the ones with cinnamon sugar), but very few bakeries make them.  You may have just inspired me to try my own!  I’ve found the AB recipe – what did you add/do differently, if you don’t mind telling? 

Thanks Kim!

Nothing too dramatic, I just swapped out half of the molasses for golden syrup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
delish as ever isomer!  And what clean edges (now I'm just harassing you!).

Here are a few recent things.

Butterscotch cheesecake

gallery_41282_4652_37690.jpg

Inspired by something I had by Adrian Vasquez at Providence, White truffle infused ganache inside of chocolate pasta with blood orange reduction and cracked pepper.

gallery_41282_4652_8156.jpg

And with the same ganache, I made this lil treat

gallery_41282_4652_36752.jpg

Show me how to make the chocolate pasta.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I came across a jar of sour cherries from Trader Joe's lurking in the back of the fridge and as I am doing the "eat from your fridge/freezer thing," I decided to try my hand at a very old-fashioned dessert - Pennsylvania Dutch cherry flip cake. Yummy! I could have done with about 2 tablespoons of vanilla ice cream alongside but as that wasn't in the freezer, I gave it a miss.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_1001.jpg

Torta di Mandorla (Moist Almond Cake)

The last slice of the first cake I ever baked. Up to this point I've stuck to cooking only but my girlfriend's birthday rolled around, so I figured I'd try out something new: baking. I'm pleased to report she enjoyed it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knaw: Nice first cake and first post. Welcome to the asylum.

gallery_53467_5170_15941.jpg

cebada con leche - helado de cajeta - caramelo del limon - cebada soplada


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flourless white chocolate and 70% bittersweet chocolate cake topped with ganache and served with strawberry-lime pink peppercorn cream cheese ice cream. Plated with strawberry-raspberry coulis, chocolate straws, and a chocolate dipped strawberry.

gallery_59301_5864_17591.jpg

gallery_59301_5864_57291.jpg

gallery_59301_5864_17769.jpg


Flickr Shtuff -- I can't take a decent photo to save my life, but it all still tastes good.

My new Blog: Parsley, Sage, Desserts and Line Drives

"I feel the end approaching. Quick, bring me my dessert, coffee and liqueur."

Anthelme Brillat-Savarin's great aunt Pierette (1755-1826)

~Lisa~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who else can I tell?

Yesterday I made Alton Brown's Serious Vanilla Ice Cream, as cited on Cookbooks for Ice Cream & Sorbets (not exact name) and it is incredible!!!

Today it is still soft enough to scoop...set the freezer at -4 degrees F as instructed. This recipe is lower in whipping cream than many and has no eggs! Good-O for caloric intake which is already high enough.

Of course, I substituted my glace kumquats...what on earth could I really do with them? :huh: ...for his peach preserves, and added chopped pecans. Yummm :raz: (means 'yum')

I am so excited! :rolleyes: A terrific success!!! :rolleyes:


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Post number two...busy lady.

Especially for those of you with grandchildren. I just received a thank you note from the kids at the MultiCultural Center in Moab. Makes it all worthwhile and fun. I get to be a kid again.

Using a recipe from by Elizabeth LaBau for 'Conversation Hearts' at About Candy.com, I made the candy dough, colored and flavored it, rolled & cut it into assorted largish shapes (not hearts) and then made Royal icing in six different colors, divided into 12 separate little plastic bags and turned it over to the Center staff. Added some premade bitsies and eyes. The kids had a ball decorating and eating the candies. No, I forgot about photos.

After these candies and the Valentine's red heart hard candy lollipops...not to mention the Christmas candies...my stock is running very high.!! The mystery candy lady, indeed. :wink:

I do love the magic of making confections for kids. They are not sophisticated nor difficult, but they are fun and the kids here are ecstatic. Just think what I can make for them for Easter.


Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made "Blondies" from Laura Brody's "Basic Baking." I had thought it was a rich chewy butterscotch brownie like my mom used to make...it was sort of dense spongy cakey rubbery. Hmm. I wish I had made any of the amazing things pictured a couple posts back...they all look amazing!


"Los Angeles is the only city in the world where there are two separate lines at holy communion. One line is for the regular body of Christ. One line is for the fat-free body of Christ. Our Lady of Malibu Beach serves a great free-range body of Christ over angel-hair pasta."

-Lea de Laria

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knaw – that is some first effort!!! Beautiful crumb and it looks so moist! Congratulations and welcome.

Lisa2k – the flourless cake looks just delectable!

Georgia Cracker Candy:

gallery_34972_5436_53128.jpg

I made these for work to celebrate a birthday – just a bottom crust of graham crackers, PB, butter and 10X and a topping of melted chocolate. No baking – just refrigerate and cut. They were pretty good – not quite as peanut buttery as I’d like, but everyone at work liked them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wanna decorate my cake for me? :wacko: I'm just wiped after a long couple of weeks of great sales and I've been dorking around with this cake for far too long and quite simply I don't care how it looks anymore - have you ever finished a product just so you can post it here? Well, this is mine.

gallery_41282_4652_12690.jpg

Its going to be great, but it definitely needs those final touches. So here's what I have from bottom to top:

grapefruit shortbread

very thin layer of 85% tempered chocolate

honey cake with black tea and szechuan peppercorns

grapefruit mousse

celery mousse

celery geleè

The theme is really the grapefruit, but the celery will be right behind it.

So, any suggestions? I'll do whatever you tell me to as long as I have the ingredients. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

kim shook: Those look really, really good. No bake, huh? I think I may give 'em a try

gfron1: I am in awe and envious of the super clean edge on that cake!!!! Ever get anywhere with the upside down bowl cake?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gfron1: I am in awe and envious of the super clean edge on that cake!!!! Ever get anywhere with the upside down bowl cake?

Anyone mind pointing me in the direction of these directions? I need all the help I can get with clean edges.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you're looking at it.  help me decorate it and I'll show you the guts :)

I know less than nothing about cakes or cake decorating, so I'm kinda hoping you'll teach us n00bs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the final product - I, like Tri2Cook, do not claim any skill beyond a kindergartener when it comes to decorating cakes...but it was very tasty

gallery_41282_4652_73951.jpg

Grapefruit shortbread, black tea infused honey cake with szechuan peppercorns, white chocolate with szechuan, grapefruit bavarois, celery mousse and celery gelee:

gallery_41282_4652_117920.jpg

The whole process is at my blog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob – that cake is just amazing looking. I’d really love to taste it!

I tried a friend’s browned butter chocolate chip cookies again. He had given me a couple of tips to improve them and stop them from flattening out and spreading so much. He suggested that I use 5 oz. cups of flour and to chill the dough balls for a couple of hours before baking. It really helped that a lot. And the flavor with the browned butter is fantastic:

gallery_34972_3570_3674.jpg

See how much higher they are? Here are my last ones:

gallery_34972_3570_13357.jpg

But the texture suffered a little. Look inside:

gallery_34972_3570_5254.jpg

They were a little dense. So maybe I play a little with the time in the fridge – I had them in there for 4 hours. Maybe only 1 hour? I just love the flavor and that the didn’t end up being Frisbees, but I want a little more tenderness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wanna decorate my cake for me?  :wacko:  I'm just wiped after a long couple of weeks of great sales and I've been dorking around with this cake for far too long and quite simply I don't care how it looks anymore - have you ever finished a product just so you can post it here?  Well, this is mine.

gallery_41282_4652_12690.jpg

Its going to be great, but it definitely needs those final touches.  So here's what I have from bottom to top:

grapefruit shortbread

very thin layer of 85% tempered chocolate

honey cake with black tea and szechuan peppercorns

grapefruit mousse

celery mousse

celery geleè

The theme is really the grapefruit, but the celery will be right behind it.

So, any suggestions?  I'll do whatever you tell me to as long as I have the ingredients.  Thanks.

wow! totally inspired by those flavor combos...daring, ballsy, incredible :) you said you've been wanting to finish the cake...does that mean you assembled it and its been hanging out in the fridge? aren't you worried about the mousse deflating? i love mousse, but am afraid of how long a mousse can last before being consumed....most mousse has gelatin, (except my chocolate mousse doesn't use it) but i've heard horror stories about having it out of the fridge very long, or having it weep or deflate...can that happen?

anyway, sorry i got off topic. but man. can't wait to see the finished cake!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's the final product - I, like Tri2Cook, do not claim any skill beyond a kindergartener when it comes to decorating cakes...but it was very tasty

gallery_41282_4652_73951.jpg

Grapefruit shortbread, black tea infused honey cake with szechuan peppercorns, white chocolate with szechuan, grapefruit bavarois, celery mousse and celery gelee:

gallery_41282_4652_117920.jpg

The whole process is at my blog.

i'm crying. :wub: that cake is so beautiful. God bless people like you! :) and don't be so modest...all your posts/advice/pictures on all these forums are awesome. you are very inspiring!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rob – that cake is just amazing looking.  I’d really love to taste it! 

I tried a friend’s browned butter chocolate chip cookies again.  He had given me a couple of tips to improve them and stop them from flattening out and spreading so much.  He suggested that I use 5 oz. cups of flour and to chill the dough balls for a couple of hours before baking.  It really helped that a lot.  And the flavor with the browned butter is fantastic:

But the texture suffered a little.  Look inside:

They were a little dense.  So maybe I play a little with the time in the fridge – I had them in there for 4 hours.  Maybe only 1 hour?  I just love the flavor and that the didn’t end up being Frisbees, but I want a little more tenderness.

Kim, I think if you chilled them just the same but flattened them a bit when you put them on the pan that they would probably turn out just right.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You really are too kind Erika :) Some time you should look at my early posts where my ugliest creations dwell...I've learned lots from these threads and do every day. This was like so many other desserts - I thought it was just okay (translation: not sweet enough) and Tyler thought it was the best ever (translation: not too sweet). I will say once again, you're missing out if you haven't worked celery into a dessert!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rob – that cake is just amazing looking.  I’d really love to taste it! 

I tried a friend’s browned butter chocolate chip cookies again.  He had given me a couple of tips to improve them and stop them from flattening out and spreading so much.   He suggested that I use 5 oz. cups of flour and to chill the dough balls for a couple of hours before baking.  It really helped that a lot.  And the flavor with the browned butter is fantastic:

But the texture suffered a little.  Look inside:

They were a little dense.  So maybe I play a little with the time in the fridge – I had them in there for 4 hours.  Maybe only 1 hour?  I just love the flavor and that the didn’t end up being Frisbees, but I want a little more tenderness.

Kim, I think if you chilled them just the same but flattened them a bit when you put them on the pan that they would probably turn out just right.

Thank you, I'll try that the next time I do them. They were a little 'dome-y', weren't they :biggrin: ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By Nn, M.D.
      I'm very excited to share with you all a recipe that I developed for a double crust apple pie.  I had been inspired a few weeks ago to come up with a series of 3-ingredient recipes that would focus on technique and flavor but still be simple enough for the unseasoned chef.  I decided to make an apple pie as a challenge to myself--never having made one before--and as a way to show those who might find pastry intimidating how easy and adaptable it can be.
       
      Basic Shortcrust Pastry
      Ingredients:
      - 300g flour
      - 227g salted butter, cold
      - 2 lemons, zested with juice reserved
       
      1. Cut butter into small chunks.  Beat butter, zest of the 2 lemons, and flour together with an electric mixer OR combine with pastry blender OR rub together with fingers OR blitz in a food processor until it resembles sand.
      2. Add just enough water to bring the mix together into a dough (about 20g for me).  You'll know your pastry is ready when you can press it together and it stays in one piece.
      3. Divide dough in two and wrap tightly with plastic.  Refrigerate for at least 2 hours, or overnight.
      4. When ready to use, roll out each portion to 13 inches in diameter. (I do this between two sheets of parchment paper.  Don't worry too much if the parchment sticks to the pastry. I periodically placed mine in the freezer to help keep everything cold, and the butter will separate from the parchment when frozen.)
      5. Take 1 portion of rolled dough and place it in a 9-inch tart tin with a removable bottom.  Gently press into the sides to ensure even coverage.  Place in the freezer for 30 minutes.  Freeze the other portion of dough in-between the parchment pieces.
       
      Apple Filling (and Assembly)
      - 1 kg apples (I used about 7 apples for this recipe.)
      - 220g dark brown sugar, divided
      - 1 egg, separated
       
      Making the apple butter: 
      1. Cut and core 500g of your apples, but do not peel.  Add cut apples, juice of the one lemon, about 100g or so of water, and 170g of sugar to a large saucepan.
      2. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce to a simmer and cover.  Let the apples cook for 20-30 minutes or until tender.
      3. Remove from heat and blend until smooth.
      4. Return puree to saucepan and simmer uncovered over low heat, stirring occasionally, for an hour.  Color should deepen and the mixture should thicken slightly, but do not allow it to scorch.
      5. Remove from heat and refrigerate until cool.
       
      Apple filling:
      1. Peel, quarter, and core the remaining 500g of apples. Slice on a mandolin to about 1/8th inch thickness. Place sliced apples in a large bowl of cold water while slicing remaining apples.
      2. Once apples are sliced, drain water and add the juice from the remaining lemon, as well as the remaining 50g of sugar, over the apples. Stir to coat.
       
         
       
      Assembly:
      1. Remove pie base from the freezer.  Dock with a fork and brush on egg white.  Place back in the freezer and allow to set for for about 5-10 minutes.
      2. Pour the entire recipe of apple butter into the pie base and even out with an offset spatula.
      3. Arrange apple slices over the apple butter.
      4. Remove remaining pie dough from the freezer and cut designs in while still cold. Transfer to the surface of the pie and seal overhanging edges.  Trim excess dough.
      5. Brush top pastry with egg yolk (beaten with any remaining egg white) and bake in a 365˚F oven for 60-70 minutes.  Crust should be shiny and golden brown.
      6. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely before removing from tin.
       
      Some notes:
      The reason for using salted butter is I think the flavor incorporates a little better into the mix than if I were to use unsalted butter and added salt.  That being said, you could do that instead, though your recipe would then have 7 ingredients The addition of apple butter here takes the place of the normal apple pie filling, which is usually thickened with cornstarch and is typically quite sweet.  By using the apple butter, I push the flavor of apple forward beyond what you would find in a typically apple pie.  Also, the apple butter acts as a glue of sorts so that my slices are always clean, so no need to resort to adding thickeners or extra sweeteners. I'm always looking for a way around blind baking, and using an egg white seal has worked out very well for me. The egg white creates a water-tight layer between the crust and the filling, so no matter how wet my filling is, the crust will always bake crispy and won't get soggy for as long as the pie is around. Feel free to change this up as you see fit.  Obviously you can spices to this (I recommend cinnamon, clove, and cardamom) but the beauty of this pie is that it's really not necessary.  Although at first blush it may seem one-noted, the harmony between the flaky, almost savory crust and the bright and refreshing filling is one that doesn't need any help, in my honest opinion.  

       
      So there you have it! My 6-ingredient apple pie, sure to become a go-to for me, and hopefully for you as well!
       
    • By ResearchBunny
      Posted 6 hours ago Dear EGulleters,
      ResearchBunny here. I've just found you today. I've been lolling in bed with a bad cold, lost voice, wads of tissues, pillows, bedding around me. I spent all of yesterday binge-watching Season 2 of Zumbo's Just Desserts on Netflix from beginning to grand finale. I have been a hardcore devotee of Rose Levy Beranbaum since the beginning of my baking passion -- after learning that she wrote her master's thesis comparing the textural differences in cake crumb when using bleached versus unbleached flour. I sit up and pay attention to that level of serious and precision! While Beranbaum did study for a short while at a French pastry school, she hasn't taken on the challenge of writing recipes for entremets style cakes. That is, multi-layer desserts with cake, mousse, gelatin, nougatine or dacquoise layers all embedded in one form embellished with ice cream, granita, chocolate, coulis. After watching hours of the Zumbo contest, I became curious about the experience of designing these cakes. Some of the offered desserts struck me as far too busy, others were delightful combinations. I was surprised that a few contestants were eliminated when their offerings were considered too simple or, too sophisticated. So I'd like to hear from you about your suggestions for learning more about how to make entremets. And also, what you think about the show. And/or Zumbo.
      Many thanks.
      RB
      ps. The show sparked a fantasy entremet for my cold. Consider a fluffy matzo ball exterior, with interior layers of carrot, celery, a chicken mince, and a gelatin of dilled chicken broth at its heart!
    • By TexasMBA02
      After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online.  After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them.  Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes.  My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get.  I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are.  I was hoping somebody had some insight.  I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all.
       
      This one appears to be older.

       
      And this one appears to be the newer of the two.

       
      Any insight would be helpful.
       
      Thanks,
       
    • By pastrygirl
      Anyone have a favorite recipe for chocolate cake using semisweet chocolate?  My usual chocolate cake recipe uses cocoa, but I have some samples of chocolate I want to use up for a workplace party.  Yes, I could make brownies or ganache frosting, or chocolate mousse or chocolate chunk cookies, just feeling like cake this weekend ...
    • By onemorebitedelara.com
      Has anyone used Valrhona Absolut Crystal neutral glaze particularly to thicken a coulis or to glaze a tart?  If so, how did you like it and is there another glaze you think worked as well but is less expensive or can be purchased in smaller quantities?  
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...