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Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)

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A pear and blue cheese tart (recipe here on my blog):

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I used Finnish Aura Gold blue cheese, the filling is seasoned with what you'd call 'pumpkin spice' in the US. I really liked it, and it's versatile. I can imagine serving this as a starter, or as a dessert, or simply as an accompaniment for wine. :rolleyes:

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Great flavours, Pille. Looks pretty hefty.

I made Grape cake yesterday, using my new rented house's electric oven. It's not too bad.

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Please take a quick look at my stuff.

Flickr foods

Blood Sugar

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I needed to make some cupcakes as a thank you, so I did these Maple-Walnut Cupcakes with Candied Walnuts.

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The cupcake is where the walnuts hide and the frosting holds the maple with a decadent maple buttercream. We sampled a couple for dessert before giving them away :sad:

gallery_51259_4126_79848.jpg

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I just made these and they're very good. I used almonds instead of macadamias, reduced the sugar by 25%, and cut down the salt:

Chocolate Chunk Macadamia Coconut Cookies

http://www.recipezaar.com/76580


There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

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I made Dorie Greenspan's Golden Brioche last night, and this morning I used half the dough for her Pecan Sticky Buns.

My husband, he's so funny, they are sitting on the counter and he keeps going by and saying, "Oh, just a half."

There are three left.


“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”

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Not a pie, cake, or cookie, but Molly Katzen's Yogurt Herb bread from The Enchanted Broccoli Forest. My girls love it.


Aria in Oregon

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I got the 9-5 job thing going on today, so nothings baking. But yesterday I made form the King Author Flour Baking Companion, Cheese Pennies, Cranberrie Orange Biscotti, Cinnamon Nut Coffee Ring.

MMMMMMMMM.....they were so good......


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Received my Steam Baking Master Artisan Bread Pan on Saturday, so I had to try it out. Having no baking time available in the schedule for the day, I used the second recipe in the instruction booklet, which used a small poolish in a very simple recipe.

Baked the loaves yesterday, and ended up with french bread that I think might rival Safeway's! :hmmm:

Okay, I didn't use any independent judgment at all in choosing the recipe or following it, but I'd still hoped for something with body, a little chewiness, a little taste . . . but it did have a crisp crust. Not worthy of a photo.

I'll play some more and report when I have some success.


Life is short. Eat the roasted cauliflower first.

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Dorie Greenspan's peanut butter brownies from epicurious.com and Chewy Almond/Cherry Bars from Alice Medrich's cookies and brownies.

I'm going to dinner at a friend's house (a great excuse to use loads of chocolate and peanut butter.)

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Thanksgiving today here in Canada.

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Pumpkin cake with chocolate-chestnut buttercream and cubes of chestnut flan and pumpkin flan.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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A birthday cake for a friend who can't eat wheat (she poofs a lot  :blink: ).  Almond chocolate cake with orange and lemon peel.  Its darker than it looks in this picture:

gallery_41282_4652_13342.jpg

Cripes! Can I be your friend? :wub:

cough cough <recipe> cough cough :wink:

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I'm bah humbug about special diet foods, but The Old Foodie's recipe in post #3 chronicled in THIS topic is where I got the recipe.  It truly was amazing.

Thanks for the pointer. From the recipe, it seems dead easy to make. If only I could get some good non-mikan oranges around here! Must find some soon!

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Three recent desserts: on Sunday I baked a Beetroot & Ginger Cake:

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We bought the ISI Gourmet Whip last Friday, and straight away tried the Piña Colada Espuma (recipe from the booklet accompanying the purchase):

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We really liked it. Yesterday night we tried Ferran Adria's recipe for Pistachio Mousse in The Cook's Book (ed. Jill Norman). It does resemble (well, at least a little) the original creation, don't you think? :rolleyes:

gallery_43137_2974_5523.jpg

Will have to try this one again, with couple of changes..

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We really liked it. Yesterday night we tried Ferran Adria's recipe for Pistachio Mousse in The Cook's Book (ed. Jill Norman). It does resemble (well, at least a little) the original creation, don't you think?  :rolleyes:

gallery_43137_2974_5523.jpg

Will have to try this one again, with couple of changes..

It looks very cool but if you hadn't said it was mousse I would have thought it was some type of bread. It looks like it has been baked. What is it actually like?


Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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We really liked it. Yesterday night we tried Ferran Adria's recipe for Pistachio Mousse in The Cook's Book (ed. Jill Norman). It does resemble (well, at least a little) the original creation, don't you think?  :rolleyes:

gallery_43137_2974_5523.jpg

Will have to try this one again, with couple of changes..

It looks very cool but if you hadn't said it was mousse I would have thought it was some type of bread. It looks like it has been baked. What is it actually like?

Well, first it's sprayed (?) out of the Gourmet Whip, and then microwaved for 45 seconds. Our was a bit denser than it should have been, the one on the photo looks a lot lighter & natural sponge like :laugh: in texture.

Oh well, we'll try again and hopefully have better luck next time :rolleyes:

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