Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)


Afterburner
 Share

Recommended Posts

GTO: Thanks! I think, the treadmill for me. And just fish (FISH!) and vegetables.. (but I'm watching Heroes and I can't help myself eating potato chips...)

Rob: Thanks you so much! :smile: I can't wait! For Filipino desserts, since most people don't have ovens, steamers are invaluable. I'm intrigued to find out what you baked.

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heroes is awesome, I was a little bit "Meh" to begin with, didn't think I'd get into it, but yeah, really enjoying it. (Not dessert related I know.)

Looking at those truffles is making me feel ill though, Mark. Despite all the stuff I do with chocolate, I cannot stand truffles. They're like eating the core of a Planet made of chocolate and usually cause me to feel violenty sick, if not physically vomit. Lol, I'm sure you make fantastic, textbook truffles however!

Please take a quick look at my stuff.

Flickr foods

Blood Sugar

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome stuff. I wanted to throw a couple things in for the "dessert-a-thon" but I don't have a lot of time this weekend. I don't have anything to offer with the beauty of the "driftwood" cake and can't offer the mouthwatering creativity and sheer volume that gfron1 and jumanggy brought to the table so I decided to put on the thinking cap and make the theme of my contribution "Weird".

First, I decided to twist the old catering standard by napoleon-izing it. alternating layers of cantaloupe/honey/tahitian vanilla sherbet and honeydew/honey/rosewater sherbet seperated by crisp salty/sweet layers of caramelized prosciutto. It's topped with honey sweetened, peppercorn infused whipped cream.

gallery_53467_5046_99012.jpg

Next is buttered peas 'n' carrots. Mousse of pea puree, butter, honey, lemon zest and juice and a pinch of nutmeg folded into vanilla whipped cream. Mousse of carrot puree with butter, honey, tangerine zest and juice and a pinch of cinnamon folded into vanilla whipped cream. A sauce of browned butter, sugar, cream and vanilla bean. Topped with candied carrot pieces.

gallery_53467_5046_42254.jpg

P.S. I won't be offended by "yuck" replies. :raz:

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Inspired by bergerka's foodblog this week, I made a Valrhona chocolate mousse with olive oil (Colli Etruschi Blera?), black pepper, Maldon. The mousse is Herve This's recipe from Molecular Gastronomy, since that's the theme for dinner tonight. It's made with nothing but water and chocolate, and is at once richer and lighter than standard chocolate mousse--richer, because it has no cream to cut the flavour of the cocoa, and lighter because there is little fat to dull the taste of the chocolate. The biscotti is flavoured with anise and wild fennel pollen.

1176243418_dbed694179.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Inspired by bergerka's foodblog this week, I made a Valrhona chocolate mousse with olive oil (Colli Etruschi Blera?), black pepper, Maldon. The mousse is Herve This's recipe from Molecular Gastronomy, since that's the theme for dinner tonight. It's made with nothing but water and chocolate, and is at once richer and lighter than standard chocolate mousse--richer, because it has no cream to cut the flavour of the cocoa, and lighter because there is little fat to dull the taste of the chocolate. The biscotti is flavoured with anise and wild fennel pollen.

1176243418_dbed694179.jpg

Good Lord, that is simply beautiful. Nice job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How did the napoleon taste - it looks perfect after a weekend of overly sweets.

I'll trade you one for one of those avocado milkshakes. :biggrin: The napoleon was pretty good. A little less salty would have been better but that's ok, I was just having fun. The sherbets turned out really nice. The veggie mousse experiment wasn't as good as I hoped but was better than I honestly expected. Most liked the carrot, the response to the pea was mainly "I don't hate it but I'm not sure I actually like it either". That's ok though, again I was just messing around. No plans to keep it around for future use. Every now and then I have to get the goofiness out of my system.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Whew!"  You meant that for the desserts, but it fits for passing your exams even better!  We've been rooting for you thousands of miles away.  And in fact, we had the same dessert theme going (for the most part) - A Filipino celebration.  Your exam completion desserts are in the oven and coming this afternoon!

Ooohhhhh! I hope you made him some Sans Rival! I haven't seen one of those in ages (not since I was in the Phil. March 2006)!! Or some bibingka. I love bibingka!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ooh, I just had Sans Rival a week ago. (That's peanut or cashew dacquoise layered with egg yolk buttercream and chopped peanuts/ cashews.) I'm not a butter fan (shocking I know) but it did taste good... What kind of Bibingka do you prefer, Rona? It's as confusing to me as simply the word "pudding" must be to the British... :smile: But no mind, I like most of them if not all.

Tri2Cook, I knew you were gonna come up with something very original. I'm very curious about legume-based desserts, especially how the Japanese use adzuki beans (I've seen the Haagen-Dazs ice cream but I've never coughed up the money for it..). I'm only familiar with Hopia (not Haupia, this one's a moon cake-like thing filled with sweetened mung bean paste usually). I served the desserts with lots of potato chips for saltiness.

Ling, that looks great... The mousse looks sorbet-y.

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ooh, I just had Sans Rival a week ago. (That's peanut or cashew dacquoise layered with egg yolk buttercream and chopped peanuts/ cashews.) I'm not a butter fan (shocking I know) but it did taste good... What kind of Bibingka do you prefer, Rona? It's as confusing to me as simply the word "pudding" must be to the British... :smile: But no mind, I like most of them if not all.

Is bibingka the same as cassava cake? The one I like is kind of chewy, and very coconut-y in flavour. I'd have to ask my mother for specifics. I love Sans Rival--but it must be made with cashews! None of that peanut stuff!

Brazo de Mercedes would be nice to see, too. At a bakery in Bacolod, you have a choice of a condensed milk-based filling or butter-based filling. I prefer the butter one. Butter=good!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And last, but not least for my weeekend of baking. From the jumanggy Collection: That's Dr. Jumanggy To You Mister!

Just as Mark has grown from simple rice cookies to chocolate rice puddings, he is now a doctor (well, almost), and now he deserves a revamped Filipino classic: The Cassava Cake. I took a traditional recipe, all of which ended with "dump a can of sweetened condensed milk on the top." And as jumanggy has mentioned he doesn't like things overly sweet, and also likes pineapple. This version of Cassava Cake starts with freshly grated cassava. The topping is a light mango mousse. The glaze is pineapple lemon grass. I also experimented with crusts. The bottom is three layers of lumpia wrapper brushed with butter between each layer. The edges are a series of layers of fillo dough brushed with butter.

I expected this to be a dense, heavy cake. Instead I got a light, well balanced sweetness with a nice little tang on top.

gallery_41282_4652_5972.jpg

gallery_41282_4652_1757.jpg

Congratulations Mark!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rob: Oh, I KNOW! Regular cassava cake topping is dizzying. My family's a big fan of cassava cake and not-to-sweet desserts, so I may adapt your version someday (you're right... egg roll wrapper could find so many more uses here). Thanks so much for the desserts, I'm kind of humbled that you've made more indigenous fare than I have in my life! Thanks also for the congratulations and support. It's been a while since I've been in a hospital setting, a scrawny kid barking out orders like something out of a Pixar film. I hope it still gives me space to be a foodie like docsconz. I'll wait for your entry on Blogquat.

Rona: someday I may have to index the many confusing kinds of bibingka. Some are gelatinous and sticky, some are spongey and cakey, some are like blocks of rice porridge, depending on the region. Brazo de Mercedes (soft meringue roll filled with a neon-yellow custard) is something I planned on making, but I couldn't decide if I wanted to give it a chocolate twist or if that would destroy it. I've only ever seen or tasted the condensed milk version (10 egg yolks with sugar and a can of condensed milk).

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sadly, we finished up the last of some Soft Baked Butterscotch-Chocolate Chip cookies tonight that I made a couple days ago for the Wednesday treat day. Soft, slightly chewy and a pleasant butterscotch background.

gallery_51259_4126_102686.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last night I made one of my favorite recipes-A fruit tart in a pastry crust made with toasted hazelnuts, a layer of pastry cream with smoked cheddar, and instead of the normal apples, I used fresh apricots. The apricots actually turned out better than when I have used apples.

I pre-baked the tart shell and then spooned some of the cooled pastry cream into the shell. The tart shell is my basic pastry crust recipe with some toasted hazelnuts added. The pastry cream is a basic recipe with some smoked Tillamook cheddar stirred in at the last minute of cooking.

gallery_41580_4407_36467.jpg

I blanched the apricots in hot water for a few minutes then put them in an ice water bath. Then I peeled off the skin, leaving the apricots whole. Then I poached the apricots in a mixture of water, sugar, some orange liquer, a vanilla bean and a cinnamon stick. The apricots naturally start to split in half after about 10 minutes in the poaching liquid, so it was very easy to cut them in half and take out the pit. I let the apricots cool before adding them on top of the pastry cream.

gallery_41580_4407_47181.jpg

It wasn't totally necessary, but I thought it would be nice to serve the tart with some vanilla ice cream and a toasted hazelnut tuille cookie. The cookie was another taste of toasted hazelnuts.

gallery_41580_4407_38361.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last night I made one of my favorite recipes-A fruit tart in a pastry crust made with toasted hazelnuts, a layer of pastry cream with smoked cheddar, and instead of the normal apples, I used fresh apricots.  The apricots actually turned out better than when I have used apples. 

I pre-baked the tart shell and then spooned some of the cooled pastry cream into the shell.  The tart shell is my basic pastry crust recipe with some toasted hazelnuts added.  The pastry cream is a basic recipe with some smoked Tillamook cheddar stirred in at the last minute of cooking.

It wasn't totally necessary, but I thought it would be nice to serve the tart with some vanilla ice cream and a toasted hazelnut tuille cookie.  The cookie was another taste of toasted hazelnuts.

gallery_41580_4407_38361.jpg

Nice! Smoked cheddar pastry cream? That's awesome! I'm gonna have to try it.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both look great - its hard to get size perspective on the plum cake.  Either they are small plums or large almond slivers.  Either way they look super!

Those look like the kind of small plums that seem to be more common in England than they are in North America. Both look great GTO!

Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've really enjoyed catching up on everyone's pix today -- amazing stuff!

It's been a long time since I've posted anything, but I've been baking like a madwoman this summer. I've just completed an 8-week fundraising project, selling baked goods every weekend in our town center. We raised $800 (woohoo!), and if you're interested, you can read all about it here: www.cookiesforacure.blogspot.com

A few of the items that sold well:

gallery_32228_5101_5089.jpg

Zucchini cupcakes with buttercream

gallery_32228_5101_7741.jpg

Sesame anise melts

gallery_32228_5101_1300.jpg

Cranberry chews

gallery_32228_5101_3821.jpg

Lemon poppy seed muffins

gallery_32228_5101_22350.jpg

More zucchini cupcakes with buttercream

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are getting ready to move into the new house this week, so I thought I should make us something to munch on while we are busy unpacking. So, I made these Lavender-Scented Lemon Pistachio Biscotti today.

gallery_51259_4126_171301.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By artiesel
      Has anyone successfully made candied chestnuts (marrons glace) at home which even remotely resemble the professional ones you get from Europe?
       
      I've tried making them using RTE Chinese chestnuts from Costco with varying success:
      One batch became leathery after being simmered in (what started out as) simple syrup which had its sucrose concentration gradually increased.
       
      I have also tried soaking the chestnuts in hot water prior to beginning the candying process.  The nuts, once again, developed a tough skin after a few days.  To reverse the tough skins I added more water to the syrup, broke the nuts up into pieces and simmered them gently for a few hours.
      While some pieces have a tough skin, many of them have taken on a candied texture.
       
      Should any further attempts to candy chestnuts be attempted using the method of slowly simmering them in simple syrup?
       
      Please share any feedback ypu may have.  Thanks!
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By Darienne
      In hopes of sleeping better, etc, etc, I have currently given up gluten, dairy and now sugar.  The gluten and dairy pose no problems...the sugar does.  I am not happy using mannitol or erythritol or any of those artificial sweeteners...they give me severe digestive problems.   But I can tolerate stevia very nicely.  The only problem is that there doesn't seem to be much sweetened with this ingredient.
       
      I do have a carob/coconut oil/peanut butter/stevia candy of sorts.  I don't really like it all that much, but it does work.  That's about it.
       
      Has anyone any recipes for desserts using stevia?  Thanks.
    • By Janet Taylor
      Ever since Todd talked making cupcakes I have been cupcake crazy. Although, I am not a cake maker but more of a pie person.
      My first dessert that I love that I make is my Coconut Cream Pie w/heavy whipped cream. I don't use low fat anything and probably angioplasties is necessary after this baby.
      My second is Peach Cobbler w/rich vanilla ice cream. I never met a cobbler that I didn't like, but peach is my favorite.
      I don't make these often because I wouldn't be able to get through the front door if I did.
      How about yours?
      .....Janet
    • By amyneill
      Hi all!! 
      I work at an amazing little New Zealand Style ice cream shop in the beautiful Denver Colorado. I was hoping to get a little help on the subject of adding fruit into ice cream after extracting it and ensuring that, when the ice cream is frozen, the fruity bits don't turn into rock hard shards. I am planning on doing a cherry chocolate ice cream and I was going to soak some dried cherries that we're no longer using for something else. I was planning on using some brandy and a ton of sugar, but I was really hoping someone had a tried and true method they could send my way so that I KNOW that the fruit will be luscious as it's frozen. If you have a certain sugar ratio. I know there is the brix test, but to be honest it's been many years since pastry school and I am very rusty. Would love to hear from some of my fellow sugar-heads. 
      Thank you!
      Amy
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...