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Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)

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I'm eating cake-leveling scraps from my first ever wedding cake, a 3-tiered white cake with vanilla buttercream which I made for a coworker.

And the pictures are . . . where? :cool:

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I'm eating cake-leveling scraps from my first ever wedding cake, a 3-tiered white cake with vanilla buttercream which I made for a coworker.

And the pictures are . . . where? :cool:

I am no Chefpeon or K8memphis or JeanneCake in terms of cake decorating, and I doubt I'll ever even be close. I didn't even do any flowers or anything like that. But here's what it looked like:

gallery_23736_355_16363.jpg


Edited by Patrick S (log)

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Patrick, it's beautiful! I bet they loved it, too.

For me today, it's chocolate kirsch cake, brought home from work: two layers of devil's food cake, which is dandy all by itself, but made even better by a soaking with kirsch syrup and a chocolate kirsch mousse filling. You'd think I'd get sick of the stuff from work, but I don't.

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Your cake looks beautiful Patrick! You are so brave. I would have been very nervous about doing a wedding cake. Did you arrange the flowers as well?

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I didn't make it today, but I'm about to tuck into the last piece of ricotta pie in our fridge. The filling is made of ricotta, egg, sugar, raisins and candied orange peel (made using Andiesenji's microwave recipe) sandwiched between two layers of puff pastry. Topped with some cinammon sugar and reheated in our toaster oven, of course.


Edited by sanrensho (log)

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I had a really mediocre dessert. I had black forest cake from Safeway :wacko: , a bowl of coffee ice-cream, and a bowl of Heavenly Hash ice-cream (both from Lucerne).

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Alternating spoonfuls of Nutella and peanut butter. A way to tack on a lazy, sweet ending to a long, rough day.

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Your cake looks beautiful Patrick! You are so brave. I would have been very nervous about doing a wedding cake. Did you arrange the flowers as well?

The mother and I did the flowers. She bought them and then we both put them on the cake. I was a little nervous, but I tried to think every step out ahead of time, and it all worked out well. The hard part was resisting the urge to swan-dive into the buttercream. I made 12 cups of it to put on the cake, and all I had was a little left on the beaters and utensils.

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Well, dessert after lunch were Korova cookies, chocolate ice-cream, and coffee ice-cream.

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A large luscious white peach which left a perfumy after taste (from a local orchard).

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Last night I had warm, flaky peach empanadas with peach-almond sorbet and a drizzle of raspberry sauce. It was heavenly.

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We had friends over for dinner this weekend, and I went a little dessert-crazy: lemon meringue tartlets from "Sweet Miniatures", chocolate truffles dipped in bittersweet chocolate and in white chocolate, and an improvisation using chocolate souffle sheets, raspberry mousse, and fresh raspberries. Hard to cut cleanly but very yummy!

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Tonight it will be fresh apple pie with apples from a co-worker's tree. I don't know what kind they are, but they're relatively tart. The pie's in the oven right now.

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well this isn't exactly an "after dinner dessert"...it was more like dinner. I ate most of a pan of chocolate walnut fudge. :laugh: Only my second time making fudge...yeah I'm not a big fan of it.

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We had homemade Peach Cobbler from local peaches, topped with homemade Creme Fraiche Ice Cream. The peaches were lightly scented with cinnamon and a touch of lemon zest. Yum, yum, yum. Dessert is my favorite meal. (Sometimes it's my only meal.)

Eileen

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I made 2 desserts today for tomorrow's dinner....friends are coming over for my birthday and I love to cook, so I'm having a blast! I made Chocolate-Orange Mousse (from the Barefoot in Paris cookbook), and Cook's Illustrated's "Perfect Lemon Bars." I have tasted both and I am thrilled with the results. The lemon bars are truly perfect...the crust is excellent and the filling is just right.

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I made Ling's brownie recipe, after a glance through recipegullet, yesterday.

I thought I would eat them for dessert, this week...

I'll be lucky if they last through tomorrow....

These brownies deserve a medal. :cool:

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I think we have a terminologyh problem here.

WHat you have mostly been discussing is the sweet or pudding course.

Desert is served with or after the coffee at the end of the meal and might be cheese, or petit four, or fruit or all three.

I made damson cheese from the damsons on the tree in the garden. Sliced into small cubes and rolled in sugar as a comfit, they make excellent deserts.

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Desert is served with or after the coffee at the end of the meal and might be cheese, or petit four, or fruit or all three.

We had these brownies with coffee at the end of the meal.

Whatever you call it, it's the best course. :biggrin:

Chacun a son gout......

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I think we have a terminologyh problem here.

WHat you have mostly been discussing is the sweet or pudding course.

Desert is served with or after the coffee at the end of the meal and might be cheese, or petit four, or fruit or all three.

In the U.S. at least, pretty much no one defines dessert as being limited to the options of cheese, petit fours and fruit. 'Dessert' is used as a synonym for the sweet course.

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"Sweet or Pudding course" are terms never used in the U.S., where a pudding is a spoonable custard.

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Thanks for the link to Ling's brownie recipe....it sounds divine! Scharfeberger chocolate is soooo good, but quite pricey, so these will need to be special occasion brownies for sure.

One thought on that recipe, if Ling is out there....I find it much easier to follow a recipe when the ingredients are listed in the order they are used. Helps to ensure I don't forget anything! :smile:

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I made Ling's brownie recipe, after a glance through recipegullet, yesterday.

I thought I would eat them for dessert, this week...

I'll be lucky if they last through tomorrow....

These brownies deserve a medal.  :cool:

Wow, such high praise! That made my day...thank-you! :wub:

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Last night I had warm, flaky peach empanadas with peach-almond sorbet and a drizzle of raspberry sauce. It was heavenly.

Any chance you could share the recipe and instructions for peach empanadas or point me in the right direction? Just the thought of it is making my mouth water.

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