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misstenacity

eG FoodBlog: MissTenacity -The Land of Enchilement - A week in Albuque

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Good morning, everyone. Let me begin by saying I am freakishly excited and quiveringly nervous. Let's begin, then? :biggrin:

I often eat a multi-stage breakfast, as you'll see shortly.

This morning I slunk out of bed at 4:40 to make it to a 5:15 Pilates class (I only do this once per week!), drinking a small coffee adulterated with General Foods International Coffee (vanilla flavor - an on again, off again addiction) on the drive over.

After class, and partially awakened, I head over to work and eat a greens bar on *that* drive. Calories of any sort after being at the gym is always a good idea.

Finally, at work, I have my customary cafe au lait with crappy work brew and nuked 2% milk, and a small bowl of plain yogurt with handful of granola and a little bit of leftover "breakfast" quinoa from lunch yesterday. My camera phone takes an awful picture, I know, but some visuals are better than none, I hope:

Bad photo #1:

egullet2005-01.jpg

Bad photo of freaky yogurt quinoa mush #2:

egullet2005-02.jpg

More to come, and better pictures - I promise. :blink:

Andrea

http://tenacity.net

[edited to change photo links]


Edited by misstenacity (log)

"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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Good morning, Andrea! I am tired already after reading the hour you awoke! I look forward to your blog, I have never been to New Mexico and can't wait to hear al about your area.


Barbara Laidlaw aka "Jake"

Good friends help you move, real friends help you move bodies.

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viva green chile!

Looking forward to your blog from Duke city.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Good morning, everyone.  Let me begin by saying I am freakishly excited and quiveringly nervous.  Let's begin, then?  :biggrin:

I often eat a multi-stage breakfast, as you'll see shortly.

This morning I slunk out of bed at 4:40 to make it to a 5:15 Pilates class (I only do this once per week!), drinking a small coffee adulterated with General Foods International Coffee (vanilla flavor - an on again, off again addiction) on the drive over.

After class, and partially awakened, I head over to work and eat a greens bar on *that* drive.  Calories of any sort after being at the gym is always a good idea.

Finally, at work, I have my customary cafe au lait with crappy work brew and nuked 2% milk, and a small bowl of plain yogurt with handful of granola and a little bit of leftover "breakfast" quinoa from lunch yesterday.  My camera phone takes an awful picture, I know, but some visuals are better than none, I hope:

Bad photo #1:

egullet2005-01.jpg

Bad photo of freaky yogurt quinoa mush #2:

egullet2005-02.jpg

More to come, and better pictures - I promise.  :blink:

Andrea

http://tenacity.net

Andrea,

I am tickled pink that you're blogging, I can't wait. I'm slightly techno challenged but one day I will get it together to do a blog from the Duke City as well. Have Fun and Bolg on!

You mentioned the gym, do you by any chance do Pilates at NM Sports and Wellness?

I belong there but, haven't heard anything about their Pilates classes. I wrote a piece for Albuquerque the Magazine about Pilates Southwest and LOVED my session with Holly Gerenger. Ofcourse, classes would be much more cost effective at NMSW.

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Some of my fondest vacation memories was the 5 days that we spent in New Mexico just after Christmas... I can't believe that 10 years has gone by since we took that trip. We had some wonderful food experiences there, and I can't wait to follow your blog this week!


Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Despite my best intentions, the operation to successfully graft my digital camera to my hand did not take, so I do not have photos from lunch today. I apologize. :sad:

We went across the parking lot, some coworkers and I, to have lunch at the sports bar and 'celebrate' someone's last day. The food at Skybox is generally in the range of edible <------> OK. I had one of their most palatable offerings - Green Chile Chicken Stew. For Skybox, this is chunks of potato, chile, and chicken in a lime-green thick base. It is not entirely known what this base is composed of, but usually it has a decent amount of heat so it works for me.

The first day I was in Albuquerque, a new friend drug me down to the Frontier and ordered me to have a breakfast burrito. The spice nearly killed me and continued to do so for the next day or two. :huh: However, I have been in New Mexico for 7 years now, and my tolerance for chile has continued to rise, such that it is difficult for me to eat *anywhere* - New Mexican, Thai, you name it - and be challenged by the spice. There is one notable exception that I hope to visit in the next week and share with you, a small dive in Santa Fe that is worth the 1 hour each way trip.

Thank you for the welcome, and don't forget, "A day without chile is like a day without sunshine."

Andrea

http://tenacity.net


"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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New Mexico is one of my favourite places! I hope we'll be seeing at least some green chile this week... :biggrin:

If requests are being taken, I'm hoping for a Stacked Enchilada appearance. Then again, it probably takes an extra Pilates class or three to get rid of that. :raz:


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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A quick run-down of the rest of my day at work, as it relates to food (of course).

First, after lunch I was feeling a bit.... uhrm.... in the need of some help. I wander across the street to Walgreens for a new supply of the "breakfast of champions":

egullet2005-08.jpg

Honestly, this had nothing to do with lunch itself. I do have a bit of what they like to call a "nervous stomach", and had since I was a wee kid. So having a co-worker leave on top of my exciting week in blog-land probably tipped the scale (don't worry, I'll survive).

(Oh, and I also bought some milk,

egullet2005-07.jpg

and a treat for later if the mood struck (which suprisingly, it didn't)):

egullet2005-09.jpg

Of the "candy" brands of chocolate, I am partial to Dove Dark - it is much smoother than Hershey's Special Dark, which will do in a pinch. Sometimes I'll buy the big bag of individual Doves ("Promises", I think they're called) to have in my desk drawer for moments of crisis during work. Next week I'll definitely give you a grande tour of my desk, the food I have stacked on top of it as well as my drawer stashes. Its probably a little prettier than my fridge, anyway....

Righty then, an hour later things are looking up so I go to the snack wall and am lured by this promise:

egullet2005-11.jpg

And here is the actual view of that tantalizing snack:

egullet2005-12.jpg

Finally, the view of the forlorn raisins from said package, which I will not be eating. Note - I do love raisins, but only with some foods (oatmeal is a good example). I prefer my nuts alone or with chocolate.

egullet2005-13.jpg

Now, I'm off to figure out what to do for dinner this eve. Home or away, that is the question..... :laugh:

Andrea


"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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Milk in a bottle?!?!

It's been a long time since I've seen that.

Soba

I've seen it more often in recent years, but they are like... plastic jug things, not really bottles.

Actually, Whole Foods and one or two other places I've seen carry glass, but only for the expensive Organic stuff.

EDIT - Never mind, misstenacity got it. :wacko:


Edited by jhlurie (log)

Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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Ok, dinner last night. Went to a nearby favorite for homey New Mexican - Chilepenos, owned by the same extended family as 2 other places in Albuquerque proper (Perea's and Seferinos, if you're taking notes).

We live in what is called the "East Mountains", a quick 10 minute drive from the eastern edge of Albuquerque, and essentially it is on the other side of the small mountain chain that hugs town. Here's a map to give you an idea of the layout:

Albuquerque Area Map

Look in the "green" area to the right of town, I leave near Forest Park, and Chilepenos is 5mi north in Sandia Park. None of these towns are incorporated, so its just one big rural-y strip.

We sat down, after noticing that the "chilemeter" - a white board near the front door - was indicating green was hotter than red today. So.... that means enchiladas. But first, the obligatory chips and salsa:

egullet2005-15.jpg

My "usual" at Chilepenos is a bowl of red with a fried egg on top. This means dried, roasted, rehydrated and boiled red chiles pureed into a lovely flame colored soup. Besides salt as seasoning, if your chiles are good quality, there are no other ingredients. You just correct the amount of water to make the puree the desired consistency. More on this later in the week, I hope.

This time I decided to have "Nana's Enchiladas", which are traditional New Mexican style: stacked, cheese, ground beef, and onion. Of course, they are also smothered in green or red and cheese, then an egg is perched on top. Here is the steaming pile:

egullet2005-17.jpg

My companion had green chile chicken enchiladas, all rice, no garnish. This is his "usual". (Oh, and sopapillas after the meal, not with it)

His rolled enchiladas:

egullet2005-16.jpg

And yet another gratuitous look at my dish, after I've broken the egg and created yolk lava:

egullet2005-19.jpg

Once we are mostly stuffed, the to-go boxes are called forth, and the sopapilla arrives and is quickly eaten (with honey, of course):

egullet2005-20.jpg

Next post - today's food, including the visit to a Souper Bowl charity soup cook-off, and the production of 300+ cookies for a soup kitchen tomorrow. I have a busy weekend, and you are all invited! :biggrin:

Andrea

http://tenacity.net


"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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Righty then, an hour later things are looking up so I go to the snack wall and am lured by this promise:

egullet2005-11.jpg

And here is the actual view of that tantalizing snack:

egullet2005-12.jpg

Now, I'm off to figure out what to do for dinner this eve.  Home or away, that is the question.....  :laugh:

Andrea

Kars nuts! I can't believe they make it that far away - they're a product of the Motor City.

(edited to add:) And OMG, on those Nana's enchiladas.


Edited by crinoidgirl (log)

V

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The oozing chile and cheese look absolutely scrumptious. I love the food down that way. I am going to have to drink a lot of water to keep up with my salivation if the start to this blog is any indication of what is to come.

The "red" with an egg on top sounds extremely intriguing. What kinds of chiles do they use for that?


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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A silly but effective restaurant name like "Chilepenos". A cheese smothering. An Enchilada stacking, runny egg and all. Some green chiles and some red. A "chilemeter". A freakin' lovely sopapilla...

Who could ask for more? Really?

Man I sound like a rambling idiot, but I love this stuff.

My "usual" at Chilepenos is a bowl of red with a fried egg on top. This means dried, roasted, rehydrated and boiled red chiles pureed into a lovely flame colored soup. Besides salt as seasoning, if your chiles are good quality, there are no other ingredients. You just correct the amount of water to make the puree the desired consistency.

Okay, this one I've never heard of. Let me ask a delicate question. Even if you are acclimated to the chiles, doesn't this concoction tend to... er... "run" though people a bit?

Ick. Please try and answer more delicately than I asked. :biggrin:


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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I just discovered that you are blogging and I'm so glad. We're having dessert which was inspired by you tonight... the fig and port ice cream from the thyme honey thread, only I used fresh figs, and thyme instead of mint. More details later. The recipe is made and chilling, and if we have the energy, we'll freeze it later tonight.

Anyway, welcome to blog land, and I will enjoy following this.


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Ok, dinner last night.  Went to a nearby favorite for homey New Mexican - Chilepenos, owned by the same extended family as 2 other places in Albuquerque proper (Perea's and Seferinos, if you're taking notes).

I'm taking notes :-). My in laws live in Rio Rancho, and while my mother in law is a wonderful, kind, funny, warm person, she's also a self-admitted lousy cook. If I can find recommended restaurants, it means that several nights we don't have to eat her cooking.

The Nana's Enchiladas look simply amazing. Good thing there was a sale on pork recently - green chile stew is going on the menu. With a fried egg on top.

Thanks for the wonderful pictures - good thing dinner's almost ready :-).

Marcia.


Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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I've got a little bit of catching up to do.... but I have TONS of photos from yesterday, so let's get started with a quickie:

Breakfast yesterday AM: slow oatmeal w/ cinnamon & milk, coffee (not pictured).

egullet2005-21.jpg

Andrea

http://tenacity.net


"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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Thanks, everyone, for the encouragement and salivation. :-)

crinoidgirl - Yes, we have the "sweet & salty mix" and another mix that is just unsalted nuts and raisins in our vending machine at work. (A tech glory-days holdout - its still free for us to snack at work.)

docsconz - The chiles are the dried red New Mexican kind (basically the same as green but in their final stage of ripening). If you've seen a ristra:

Painting of Ristra

...that's the pods that are used.

I have a few ristras at home, but also a big plastic bag of chiles that I cook with. I *have* made "red" before using powdered red chile plus water and sometimes a thickener, but the pods have a very different flavor (fruitier) that is sometimes nice. The powder makes the end product taste very earthy - it just depends on what you're in the mood for, I suppose. I would liken it to the difference between a delicate shiraz or red zin versus a really well-aged cabernet or bordeaux.

jhlurie - Thanks for the suggestion - I've meant to try Nana's for quite some time but that night you gave me just enough of a nudge. :laugh: To answer your question directly - Yes, but only the first time or 2 in my case. (See my remarks about my friend dragging me to The Frontier my first day in town in an earlier post.)

Susan - Do let me know how your variation on the fig ice cream turns out. I'm about due to make more ice cream; my last batch turned out more crystal-y than I like, so adding honey and/or spirits seems to be the trick (when not using heavy cream, anyway).

Ok, about to make another big post with some of my photos from yesterday....

Andrea

http://tenacity.net


"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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Cookie post: Friday and Saturday I made about 350 cookies (half PB and half chocolate chip) for a charity that we do through work. More on that soon, I have to run out the door in a second....

First, the ingredients for Peanut Butter batch:

egullet2005-14.jpg

Then, the chocolate chip (before flour):

egullet2005-22.jpg

And..... after everything is combined. Have you ever seen 13lbs of cookie dough?

egullet2005-23.jpg

Now you have! :biggrin:

And the finished products getting packed up for transport - box o' cookies 1:

egullet2005-24.jpg

And 2 pans of choc chip (didn't quite have the fortitude for that many pans of actual cookies so I made about half the dough into bars):

egullet2005-25.jpg

Wow. This easily triples the number of cookies I have made in my lifetime. Obviously, I don't make a lot of cookies as per the usual daily routine....

Later this afternoon, the SOUPER BOWL!

Andrea

http://tenacity.net


"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

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Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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I just found your blog and look forward to more reading. My husband lived in Rio Rancho the whole time we were engaged. We visit ABQ about once a year. My husband has trained me well over the years- We went to Frontier for dinner a few years ago with friends and I didn't think the food was *that* spicy!

Great photos! Now, I want some blue corn chicken enchiladas for dinner. :biggrin:

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...

The "red" with an egg on top sounds extremely intriguing. What kinds of chiles do they use for that?

...

docsconz - The chiles are the dried red New Mexican kind (basically the same as green but in their final stage of ripening).  If you've seen a ristra:

Painting of Ristra

...that's the pods that are used.

I have a few ristras at home, but also a big plastic bag of chiles that I cook with.  I *have* made "red" before using powdered red chile plus water and sometimes a thickener, but the pods have a very different flavor (fruitier) that is sometimes nice.  The powder makes the end product taste very earthy - it just depends on what you're in the mood for, I suppose.  I would liken it to the difference between a delicate shiraz or red zin versus a really well-aged cabernet or bordeaux.

...

http://tenacity.net

Just to add that discovering a "bowl of red" and a "bowl of green" in New Mexico was one of my most exciting food revelations for casual regional food.

Both are so delicious just accompanied by a good, fresh hot tortilla and maybe some pinto beans. It's amazing that they come from the same chile either fresh (and roasted) or dried because the experience is so different.

Sometimes a bowl of green chile will also have a little cheese melted on top and may or may not have chunks of pork in it. For those that haven't tasted N. Mexico green chiles their taste is very unique. Although the chiles are varients of Anhaheim chiles they have a much more complex taste (attributed to 'terroir', growing conditions and varying chile varieties) and can range from mild to very hot. New Mexico roasted green chile is very addictive for many folks who experience it.

My mouth watered looking at your photos b/c I could just picture the taste; writing about it isn't helping either! :smile: (Luckily I do have a stash of green chile in the freezer and some dried Chimayo red chile in the cupboard)


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Frontier restaurant is one my favourite destinations in the world. Their fresh tortillas and green chile stew are worth the cost of the plane ticket alone.


"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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      It's that time of year again, after just getting back from our summer vacation.  This year, we went to Yogyakarta which is a city in central Java, Indonesia.  The title of the topic comes from the fact that most people there call the city Jogjakarta (pronounced jōg-ja-karta), although some people (depending on background) do call it yōg-ya-karta.  This is a special place in Indonesia - Indonesia is a mostly Muslim country, however, the region around Jogjakarta was declared a special region as it is also a Sultanate.  It was the original home to the ruler of the island of Java, and once democracy came along, the Sultan still lives there and has some kind of power in the region, as well as with the government as a whole...  It's confusing - and I would say that I'm still a bit confused, but that's ok.  Anyway, all this leads this region to be called the cultural and culinary capital of the island of Java, the most populous island in the archipelago, some of the reason it is extremely popular with domestic tourists - I'd say the vast majority of the tourists there are from other parts of Indonesia, with the balance being mostly Australians, and some Europeans and very few North Americans.
       
      Food-wise, we found Jogja interesting because it is the first Muslim area we have seen in SE Asia, which means (with very few exceptions) no pork.  There are tons of chicken dishes - many using what is called kampung chickens, or extremely free range chickens which tend to be relatively scrawny, a little tough but with a lot of flavor.  There is also some beef, some mutton/goat and fish.  Like a lot of Indonesian food, the use of sambal(s) is key - many times you will have a selection of sambal that you would use to accent or add spiciness to a dish.  Some of these sambal are crazy hot...
       
      Another thing interesting thing about being a mostly Muslim area is the seemingly ever-present call to prayer.  In the city, typically 5 times a day, the Mosques will have their best singer sing the call to prayer (which lasts about 20 minutes) over the loudspeaker systems.  If you are in an area with a few mosques, you will hear 3 different versions all going at the same time.  Some of these calls are at inopportune times - like 1:30AM - so most hotels provide ear plugs so you won't be woken up in the middle of the night.  Like we do on all our trips, we take Benadryl as a sleep aid to help get us over the jetlag... so we never needed the earplugs as we were sleeping very soundly to say the least!
       
      I think I'll sum this up by talking about how relatively inexpensive this city is.  It is probably the cheapest area that we have seen on our travels so far - you can get a luxury hotel room for about $50 per night, and a 40 minute taxi ride across the city doesn't cost more than $3-4, at the current rate of exchange.  Local food is really cheap too.  I took some photos of menus to show pricing - keep in mind that the current rate of exchange is about IDR14,100 to US$1.  What can be much more expensive is some touristy things - foreign tourists are charged a different rate from domestic tourists, and in some cases will have a separate entrance (and usually a much shorter, or non-existent, line).
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