Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
pam claughton

When you braise

Recommended Posts

What is the first dish that comes to mind when you think of braising? Have you tried any new, interesting braises?

I've been exploring the new Molly Steven's Braising cookbook, and tried her Salmon braise. The sauce is a mix of bacon, leeks, shallots, and pinot noir.

The old faithful is a beef brisket, cooked in beer, beef broth, and tons of onions.

Pam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually a blade roast.

But also osso bucco, pork shoulder, lamb shoulder, shanks.

Now and then sirloin tip.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good grief. Lamb shanks, pheasant legs, short ribs, duck legs, pork belly, chuck roast....

The other night I braised squab legs I'd marinated in (sheep's milk) yogurt with tamarind, fenugreek, cinnamon, and cloves. They're tiny things, just a couple bites each, so braising time was only 25 minutes or so, braised in the yogurt mixture and squab stock.

As a lover of poultry and game, I'll braise the legs of any bird unwary enough to wind up in my kitchen. Recipes vary, but I'm almost always pleased with the results and a satisfying braise can often be accomplished in an hour or two rather than the several hours required for lamb or veal shanks and the like, putting a braise within the range of a not-too-extraordinary week night dinner.


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a lover of poultry and game, I'll braise the legs of any bird unwary enough to wind up in my kitchen.  Recipes vary, but I'm almost always pleased with the results and a satisfying braise can often be accomplished in an hour or two rather than the several hours required for lamb or veal shanks and the like, putting a braise within the range of a not-too-extraordinary week night dinner.

Indeed, and not just the legs -- Chicken With 40 Cloves of Garlic is a classic that has the twin vitues of tasting delicious and being almost impossible to screw up. Serve it atop mashers or creamy polenta, to maximize consumption of braising liquids.

Lately we have brought much joy to the neighborhood by braising pork shoulders -- or is it pork butts? I know it when I see it -- in an in a more-or-less random ratio of apple cider, gewurtztraminer and calvados. On week two we take the leftovers and make barbecue sauce for them.


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lately we have brought much joy to the neighborhood by braising pork shoulders -- or is it pork butts? I know it when I see it -- in an in a more-or-less random ratio of apple cider, gewurtztraminer and calvados.  On week two we take the leftovers and make barbecue sauce for them.

Ooh! And country-style pork ribs braised in tequila, chicken stock, and cider vinegar with mexican oregano and cinnamon!


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The usual suspects - short ribs, lamb shanks or shoulder, duck legs. Also, I love braised fish. I use braised monkfish recipe from The Craft of Cooking a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asian seasoned

Brisket!


I Will Be..................

"The Next Food Network Star!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The usual suspects - short ribs, lamb shanks or shoulder, duck legs. Also, I love braised fish. I use braised monkfish recipe from The Craft of Cooking a lot.

Forgive a dumb question, but why braise fish? It's already moist and tender. Seems like it would dry out (why I never eat paella) and fall apart. Is it a "real" long-term braise or a briefer encounter between the fish and water?


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The usual suspects - short ribs, lamb shanks or shoulder, duck legs. Also, I love braised fish. I use braised monkfish recipe from The Craft of Cooking a lot.

Forgive a dumb question, but why braise fish? It's already moist and tender. Seems like it would dry out (why I never eat paella) and fall apart. Is it a "real" long-term braise or a briefer encounter between the fish and water?

It's a short braise, usually under 30 minutes, and like regular braising, just gives another level of flavor. Firmer fish, like Salmon and Monkfish seem better suited for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

short ribs.


"He could blanch anything in the fryolator and finish it in the microwave or under the salamander. Talented guy."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ooh!  And country-style pork ribs braised in tequila, chicken stock, and cider vinegar with mexican oregano and cinnamon!

Ooh! i would like more details of this recipe. Sound interesting....


cheers

ozmouse

melbourne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lamb osso bucco -- Lamb shanks 1.67 LB @ Sams but have to buy a case. So yes I have fixed much Lamb osso bucco.

40 clove chicken

coq a vin

Curried Fish


Never trust a skinny chef

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Braised veal breast last w/e.Seasoned with salt,pepper,powdered morita(a smoked chilie pepper).Braised in chicken stock and still moscato.It came out very good.Leftover meat made tasty ragu sauce for pasta.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pork Butt, cubed, and braised with tons of carrot puree, and a little bit of red wine, lots of roasted garlic, until the carrot is totally broken down, and you have this sexy sauce type of ragout thing that is really good on papardelle


Tonyy13

Owner, Big Wheel Provisions

tony_adams@mac.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might be a shorter list of what doesn't come to mind. But what's coming to mind right now for my favorite method of cooking is lamb shanks, ossobuco, short ribs, brisket, chuck roast, pork shoulder, blade roast, breast of veal.

I also like braising vegetables and pureeing them for a sauce.


We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorites are pot roast, carbonnade, goulash, boeuf bourguignon, lamb shanks and osso bucco, (not in any particular order). When I find beef chuck on sale, I usually buy a couple and slap them in the freezer so that I have them when I need them. For the beef braises I do, beef chuck seems to be the most versatile.


Edited by mnebergall (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ooh!  And country-style pork ribs braised in tequila, chicken stock, and cider vinegar with mexican oregano and cinnamon!

Ooh! i would like more details of this recipe. Sound interesting....

I fear I'm not so good with details. I'm more of a seat of the pants cook, especially when I braise.

I usually rub the ribs with salt and cinnamon, and let them sit over night. Sear the ribs in peanut oil, lard, what have you, in a large, deep saute pan, then set the ribs aside.

Deglaze the pan with a splash of tequila, add veggies (onions,carrots, celery or fennel, maybe a poblano or a few jalapeno chiles), brown them a bit, then return the ribs to pan.

Add stock to cover no more than 1/3 of the ribs, a splash of cider vinegar, season with a couple black peppercorns and a touch of Mexican oregano, maybe more cinnamon, a touch of ground chipotle if you want....

Voila. Cook in a low oven, checking occassionally to turn the ribs over, taste for seasoning, etc.


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stop at the library and check out Molly Steven's All About Braising (or just buy it). I'm having a really good time with this cookbook.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The usual suspects - short ribs, lamb shanks or shoulder, duck legs. Also, I love braised fish. I use braised monkfish recipe from The Craft of Cooking a lot.

Forgive a dumb question, but why braise fish? It's already moist and tender. Seems like it would dry out (why I never eat paella) and fall apart. Is it a "real" long-term braise or a briefer encounter between the fish and water?

It's called a white meat braise (Escoffier 2176) and the main differences from the braise that we're used to are:

• Use tender cuts of meat or fish

• Don't brown the meat or fish

• Don't brown the vegetables

• The cooking liquid is white stock

• Cook until done, not for hours until the meat/fish becomes tender (because it's already tender)

Personally, I like braises where the meat comes from any of the four corners of the animal. This is where the meat is toughest and it requires that long, slow cooking.


Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually love braised vegetables, it is a good technique for things beyond the trad. meat cuts.

Braised brussels are great (with shallots) and braised leeks are a favorite (with butter).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My old favorite is beef short ribs (long cut if you can get them, I love that: long cut short ribs, like jumbo shrimp)

My new favorite that my Mom cooked for us during the holidays: fresh ham. The best tasting pork roast type thing I've had in a while what with the leanification of the pigs. She simmered the ham in water for about an hour, drained it and simmered it in beer with onions, brown sugar, and carrots for another 3 or 4 hours. It was great. Can't wait to try it myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't believe no one has mentioned rabbit. (Actually, given North Americans' silly aversion to eating Thumper, I guess I can.) Anyway, it takes beautifully to braising.

With prunes, pearl onions and lardons

With white wine, mushrooms and thyme

With Pineau des Charentes

With celery, vinegar, olives and capers

With red peppers

With cream and dijon mustard

With red wine, tomatoes, pine nuts, saffron and orange peel

With white wine, anchovies and capers

With carrots, leeks and green beans

With preserved lemons and garlic

With cider

With tarragon and cream

With bacon and brandy

With choucroute

With green or red cabbage

With beer

Niçoise style (eggplants, zucchini, red peppers, tomatoes)

Sicilian style (parsnips, celery, pine nuts, golden raisins, fennel seed, vinegar and chocolate)

Cacciatore style

Etc., etc., etc.


Edited by carswell (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the category of vegetable braises, I did the first recipe in the Molly Stevens book a few nights ago (potatoes with garlic and bay leaves) - talk about a great return on a ridiculously simple recipe. It took all of 5 minutes to get it started, and the result was perfect potatoes with a silky, garlicly olive oil sauce...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live for short ribs braised in red wine and roasted veal stock. I've done it so many times I really do believe mine can stand up to the best of them. Succulent meat with an absurdly rich sauce. How can you go wrong? I always use a gremolata and serve them with pureed potatoes and caramelized baby onions. My absolute all-time favorite dish hands down.


R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday, turkey thighs (first time I've tried them this way), using white wine (Hardy Chardonnay) and chicken stock.

Cheap and GOOOOOOOOOOD!

(edited to correct spelling)


Edited by crinoidgirl (log)

V

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...