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zeitoun

Kibbe

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zeitoun   

While my wife and I stayed warm and dry within the confines of our Brooklyn apt. this week end, I prepared a Kibbe bil Sanyyah.

Kibbe is basically a mixture of meat and bulghur, it can be served raw (Kibbe Nayyeh) or cooked. In its cooked form, some of you might be more familiar with the fried little “football” shaped Kibbes which you can find in various Middle Eastern restaurant. I found out with great astonishment that it is also made in the Dominican Republic where it is called “Quipe”. The recipe “migrated” to there from the Middle East with the thousands of immigrants who settled on the island during the 60s and 70s. It is now a staple in Dominican cuisine and many street cart vendors will sell it.

Kibbe bil Sanyyah is essentially "layered" Kibbe baked in the oven. It is very common in Lebanon and it was prepared at home by my father as a Sunday meal. It is good and easy to make!! Try it out:

For the Kibbe:

1 lb. ground beef

2 cups of bulghur (I like to use a thick grain, you can also use a thinner grain)

Approx. 1 1/2 tbl. salt or to taste

2 medium size onions

2 tbl. lebanese pepper or any kind of mild spice mix you like

Olive oil

For the Kibbe stuffing:

¼ lb. ground beef

1 mid size onion chopped

½ cup pine nuts

1 tbl. sumac

Lebanese pepper or spice mix to taste

Salt to taste

Olive oil

Serve it with Yogurt Sauce mixed with diced cucumber, finely crushed dried mint (fresh doesn’t work as well) and salt.

Ingredients (sorry folks, pine nuts didn't make the picture)

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1- Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a bowl, generously cover the bulghur with lukewarm water for 15 to 25 minutes, depending on the consistency you desire. This will re-hydrate the bulghur, I like my bulghur to retain some bite and actually crack a little so I leave it in for 15/20 minutes. In the meantime puree 2 raw onions in a food processor and set aside. Puree should be smooth and “creamy”.

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2- Place the ground beef in a large mixing bowl. Before adding the bulghur to the meat, discard the water and squeeze out as much water as possible from the bulghur (squeeze it in the palm of your hand). Add the bulghur and the pureed onion to the beef. Mix well with your hand. Add the salt and pepper/spice mix in small batches (Taste the raw mixture to make sure it is properly salted). Mix well, set aside.

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3- Prepare the stuffing: Sautée the pine nuts in a little olive oil until they are well browned. Always move them around to brown evenly. Reserve on the side. In the same pan, sweat the onions for 2-3 minutes without coloring and add the ground beef. Brake it up in the pan and sautée for another 4-5 minutes. Do not overcook it!! Add the browned pine nuts, sumac, pepper/spice mix and salt to taste. Set aside.

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4- Coat a mid-size baking dish with butter, and cover with a first 1/2 inch layer of raw Kibbe. Then, cover with a second layer of stuffing. Finally, top it with another 1/2 inch layer of raw Kibbe working in pieces. “Glue” each piece together by tapping any seam with your finger (just like clay!!) to create one single layer of meat. Brush a generous coating of olive oil on top and gently score the top layer with a knife.

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5- Place in the oven and cook for approx. 45 minutes to 1 hour until the top begins to crisp.

gallery_23913_670_1106623211.jpg

6- Cut and serve with (room temperature) yogurt sauce on top. Bon Appetit!!!

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FoodMan   

I have not had Kibbeh bil Saniyah in a while. I guess it's time to make some. For more about Kibbe or Kibbeh check out the eGCI class here.

Going through both recipes I think the main difference is that I use fine bulgur for Kibbeh and I use less of it than Zeitoun. Just like most of my recipes I make them the way my mom or grandmother make them. Zeitoun was this your father's recipe?

I also noticed that your kibbeh layers are much thicker than mine, again this is all a matter of personal preference.

Elie

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zeitoun   

This is indeed the recipe i learned from my dad, with a few variations here and there. I was always under the impression that a high amount of bulghur helps the meat not shrink during the cooking process.

I have also had kibbe bil sanyyah without the layer of "hachoueh", the stuffing, just two layers of kibbe one on top the each other. Have you seen this done also?

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Wolfert   

Your tray kibbeh looks wonderful.

I have promised myself to make a tray this weekend. Thanks

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zeitoun   
Your tray kibbeh looks wonderful.

I have promised myself to make a tray this weekend. Thanks

Great! please report back on the outcome and the recipe you'll be using :smile:!!

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M. Lucia   

Shukran / merci!

I was at first surprised at the shade of your bulgur because I also use fine grain bulgur. Though the fried kibbe balls are my preferred shape, when I make this dish I pour a bit of melted butter over the top.

I once made a really good vegetarian version that was Pumpkin Layer with Spinach filling.

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Behemoth   

I haven't done this in a while. I still have the big round aluminum pan my mom used when we were in Lebanon. I remember learning how to cut the diamond pattern when I was a kid...my early geometric training.

I also melt some ghee over the top.

Strangely, we almost always had hummus & salad on the side with kibbe, rather than the yogurt salad.

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zeitoun   
Strangely, we almost always had hummus & salad on the side with kibbe, rather than the yogurt salad.

Funny, we actually started the meal with hummus and taboule. It can't get any more lebanese than that i guess..

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zeitoun   
Shukran / merci!

I was at first surprised at the shade of your bulgur because I also use fine grain bulgur. Though the fried kibbe balls are my preferred shape, when I make this dish I pour a bit of melted butter over the top.

I once made a really good vegetarian version that was Pumpkin Layer with Spinach filling.

Afouan/De rien!

I've never tried it with butter. I have prepared gratins before layering amongst other things crushed butternut squash with bulghur. It actually tastes very good.

I guess my version of a vegetarian kibbe?? :biggrin:

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hazardnc   

Thank you for posting this. I have not tried to make kibbe in many years as my first and only attempt was a greasy mess.

Kibbe is my favorite mid-east dish. My husband craves kibbe naye.

I too have a saniyah for baking.

Zeitoun, will you do a tutorial on kousa mahshi bi laban next? My husbands grandfather made this, but no one has attempted it since his death many years ago.

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FoodMan   

Zeitoun- I certainly make the non-stuffed kibbeh as well, honestly it used to be the one I prefered of the two. At my home we always called it "Kibbeh bil Zait" or "Kibbeh with oil" since it the bottom of the pan is smeared with olive oil and a good dose of the olive oil is drizzled on top before it went in the oven. This gave it a wonderful crispy crust. However, we did not make it in tow layers, just one layer that it about and inch thick. It is also serevd at room temperature with a salad or with some cucumbers and radishes and pita bread.

Lucia- Kibbeh comes in many variations and pumkin is one of them. In addition to the well known meat/bulgur version there are also vegeratrian and fish versions. the vegetarian version is made with either potato/bulgur in which case it is called Kibbet Battata, or with pumkin/bulgur and is sometimes called Kibbeh Kizabbeh. Kibbeh Kizabbeh literally translates to "Lying Kibbeh" refering to the fact that it is masquerading as kibbeh but has no meat.

It does not end here, the fillings also vary a lot, from the regular meat/pinenut, to fish, to a vegetarian filling, to a wonderful yogurt/lamb filling...

My Lebanese cookbook has several of those. I will try and adapt one or two and post about them on this thread if y'all are interested. I have not made pumking kibbeh in a while.

As for Koussa bil Laban (stuffed zuchinni cooked in yogurt), that's a topic for another thread :smile:.

Elie

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FoodMan   
Thank you for posting this.  I have not tried to make kibbe in many years as my first and only attempt was a greasy mess.

Kibbe is my favorite mid-east dish.  My husband craves kibbe naye. 

I too have a saniyah for baking.

Zeitoun, will you do a tutorial on kousa mahshi bi laban next?  My husbands grandfather made this, but no one has attempted it since his death many years ago.

The reason for this might be because the meat was not lean enough. When making kibbeh (the "dough" not he filling) make sure the meat is very lean or you will have a greasy mess, and the kibbeh will not hold together properly since the fat melts away.

Other than that, following the recipe outlined above should yield good kibbeh.

Elie

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Wolfert   

About 12 years ago, I traveled to the Middle East and to the Eastern Mediterranean to learn about kibbeh for a book I was writing. When you check out the list below, you will understand why kibbeh has been called the masterpiece of the Middle Eastern table.

Aside from the Syrian and Lebanese versions, the Cypriots make it and call it koupas, the Israelis make it and call it kibbe, the Palestinians make it and call it kubba, the Turks, icli kofte, Assyrians, kittel, and the Armenians kufta.

The huge amount of Syrian recipes were gathered with the help of Aleppo based Al-Jabri family.

I divided the kibbeh variations: fried kibbeh, vegetarian kibbeh, grilled kibbeh, poached and steamed kibbeh, baked kibbeh, leftover kibbeh, and raw kibbeh.

I personally tasted all fifty when I did this project, but lost quite a few of the recipes in moving files from one computer to another and another over the years. The recipes I still have are typed in bold below. If anyone is interested. I'll pm those of interest to you. I no longer have them on my computer so be patient. I need to type them up. I can't post them all because the book is still in print and my publishers would have a fit.

I would love to complete my own set, so if there is anyone out there with a good version of any of the others listed below, do share. Thanks.

. .

Fried Kibbeh

1. Kibbeh Ovals Stuffed with Nuts Qras Maqliyyeh, Syria

2.Extra Crisp Ovals Stuffed with Pistachios. Icli Kofte, Gaziantep, Turkey

3. Baby Size Kibbehs Stuffed with Braised Lamb Shank, Tomatoes, and Onions. Kibbeh Hamis, Damascus, Syria

4.Tennis-Ball--Size Kibbeh. Kiibbeh Halaby, Aleppo, Syria. Huge ovals, crisp on the outside and juicy within. Known fondly as the "Pride of Aleppo."

Vegetarian Kibbeh

5.Pumpkin Kibbeh Stuffed with Spinach, Chickpeas, and Walnuts. Lebanon

6. Fish Kibbeh Flavored with Fresh Coriander and Grated Orange. Kibbeh Samak, Lebanon

7. Vegetarian Red Lentil Ovals with Tarragon-Onion Salad. Malhitali Kofte, Gaziantep, Turkey

8. Potato Kibbeh Stuffed with Fried Onions, Chickpeas, and Cinnamon, and Baked in a Tray. Kibbeh Batata bi-siniyyeh, Lebanon

Grilled Kibbeh

9. Flat Pancakes Stuffed wtih Walnuts, Butter, and Spices. Kibbeh Sajiya. Syria

10. Dome Kibbeh Stuffed with Lamb kidney Fat, Hot Pepper, Walnuts, Pomegranate Molasses and Pomegrnate seeds. Kibbeh Michwiya. Syria

11. Small or large Skewered Balls or Sausages. These Kibbeh are either stuffed or unstuffed, but always highly seasoned with herbs & spices. Aleppo. Syria

12. Kibbeh Grilled and Served in a Meat and Quince Stew, Garnished with Onions, Carrots, Pomegranate Juice, and Tomatoes. Safarjaliah, Aleppo. Syria.

Poached and Steamed Kibbeh

13. Ground Beef or Veal Shells Stuffed with Meat, Celery, Walnuts, and spices. Kibbeh Hamud, Syria. This kibbeh is poached in a tart vegetable broth flavored with mint. An old dish from the Jewish community of Aleppo.

14.Steamed Marble-size Unstuffed Bulgur Balls served in a Tangy Tomato Soup, Eksili Akitmali Ufak kofte, Gaziantep, Turkey

15.Kibbeh with Eggplant and Sumac. Soumaqieh. Aleppo. Syria. "The Cadillac of Kibbehs"

16. Lamb and Sour Cherries with Kibbeh. Kibbeh bi Karaziah. Aleppo, Syria

17.Kibbeh with Glazed Carrots and Pomegrante. Kibbeh bi Jazareeyeh. Aleppo, Syria

18. Kibbeh Steamed in pomegranate Juice Thickened with Cornstarch. Kibbeh bi Romaneya. Lebanon.

19. Kibbeh Poached in Yogurt Sauce with Garlic and Mint or Coriander or Tarragon. Labaniyeh, Lebanon and Syria

20. Lamb Dumplings and Kibbeh in Yogurt Sauce Shish Barak bi Laban, Lebanon

21. Apricot Shaped Kibbeh Poached in Yogurt Sauce wtih Sauteed Fresh Favas and Tarragon. Michemchiya. Damascus, Syria

22.Kibbeh and Chicken Poached in Yogurt Enriched Broth. Madzoon Kofte, Armenia.

23. Kibbeh with Cauliflower and Chickpeas in Yogurt-Tahini Sauce. Fakheteya-Arnabeya, Syria. This dish, tart with pomegrante juice, is topped with fried coriander and garlic.

24. Kibbeh Cooked with Favas and Swiss Chard in Yogurt Sauce. Syria.

25. Kibbeh-Poached in Fermented yogurt-Bulgur Sauce. Kibbeh Kishk. Syria

26. Kibbeh-Poached in Fermented Yogurt-Bulgur Sauce with Fried Cabbage.

27. Steamed Kibbeh with Hot Pepper Sauce. Kibbeh Flefla Hamra. Syria

28. Green Kibbeh with Swiss Chard and Walnut Sauce. Armenia and Syria.

29 White Kibbeh with Yogurt-Tahini Sauce. Kibbeh Baida. Syria

30. Poached Stuffed Kibbeh with Tahini Sauce garnished with Walnuts and Parsley, Syria

31.Poached Kibbeh with Tahini-Walnut Sauce, Fried Onions and Chickpeas. Kibbeh Ladanea. Latakia, Syria

32. Poached Kibbeh Stuffed with Almonds, Fried Onions, and Meat, garnished with Chickpeas and Lamb Shanks, and Served wtih Tahini Sauce and Hot Pepper. Kibbeh Arnabeya, Syria.

33. Large Kibbeh Stuffed with Hard Boiled eggs, poached in a Fava, Coriander, and Swiss Chard Stew. Kibbeh Faleya. Syria

34. Kibbeh Poached in Eggplant and Meat Stew. Syria.

35. Kibbeh Poached in Artichoke and Meat Stew. Syria

36. Kibbeh Poached in Pumpkin and Meat Stew. Syria

Baked Kibbeh

37.Tray Kofte, Gaziantep Style. Turkey

38. Kibbeh patties Stuffed with Mixed Nuts and Sumac. Lebanon

39. Two-Layer Kibbeh Stuffed with Meat, Onions, and Nuts, Baked in a tray. Kibbeh bi Siniyyah. Lebanon and Syria

40. Tray Kibbeh Baked with a Tahini Topping. Haifa, Israel.

41. Potato Kibbeh Stuffed with Onions and Pinenuts. Known as Kibbeh hileh, or 'trick kibbeh," because there is no meat. Syria.

42. Coil-Shaped Kibbeh Stuffed with Pinenuts, Walnuts, and Meat Kibbeh Mabrumih, Damascus, Syria.

Leftover Kibbeh

43.Leftover Kibbeh Simmered in an Onion and Tomato Stew. Syria

44. Leftover Kibbeh Simmered in Onion Sauce with Chicpeas and Tahini. Syria

45. Fried Kibbeh Topped with Scrambled Eggs, then Baked. Syria

46. REd Lentil and Blugur Blended wtih Leftover Filling of

Ground Meat, Fried with Minced Onions and pInenuts. Damascus. Syria. this kibbeh is spread out on a plate, and topped with a sauce made with the remaining ground meat. Syria.

Raw Kibbeh

47 Flat. Cold Raw Kibbeh. Topped with Warm Meat, Onions, and Walnut Sauce. Garnished with Mint and Parsley. Syria

48. Flat, Cold Raw Kibbeh Topped with Mint, Scallions, Parsley, and Olive Oil, and Served with a Warm Meat, Onion, and Tomato Sauce. Syria.

49. Flat, Cold Raw Kibbeh Garnished with Olive OIl, Parsley, and Tomato. Lebanon.

50. The Tank. Kibbeh Debbahoh. Damascus. Syria. Made with a raw shell stuffed with cooked meat, this kibbeh is shaped like a rocket and heavy like ....a tank


Edited by Wolfert (log)

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boaziko   

Zeitoun,

My favorite Kibbe recipe comes out exactly like yours. I make it with half ground lamb and half beef, a little parsley and Behar (Baharat) I love it with Tahini (next time I'll try the yogurt). I decorate the top with extra pine nuts, also as a promise of what's inside.

Wolfert,

in Israel there are a wide selection of Kibbe's (the most common pronanciation is Kubbe). It is mostly linked to Iraqui origin, especially the Kubbes that are cooked in a soup. Some restuarants simply have a 'color code' to the variuos Kubbe soups: pumpkin (orange) ; beetroot (red) okra (green).

A "chain" of 2 restaurants in Jerusalem (Ima)and Tel aviv ( Doda) are holding, till the end of January, a Kubbe Festival and is offering 11 kinds, some fried and some in a soup. The cook-chef originates in Kurdistan.

Some of the kubbe's name are: Matfuniya, Hamusta, Swandriya, Hilwa, Nablusiya, Haaleb, Batata (sweet potato). I’m sorry if some names are mis-translated, as most of the names originate from many languages.

Here's a link that shows the lady and some of her Kubbes:

http://www.iwomen.co.il/show_article.asp?a...id=87948,msn=no

Boaziko

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Wolfert   
in Israel there are a wide selection of Kibbe's (the most common pronanciation is Kubbe). It is mostly linked to Iraqui origin, especially the Kubbes that are cooked in a soup. Some restuarants simply have a 'color code' to the variuos Kubbe soups: pumpkin (orange) ; beetroot (red) okra (green).

That is so interesting. Thanks

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I went to the Kubbeh festival at the Doda (Aunt) restaurant a couple of weeks ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. We tried about five different types of Kubbeh.

Occasionally, I buy kubbeh from an Iraqi woman at the food fair at Dizengoff Center. The food fair is every Thursday evening and Friday morning at Dizengoff Center, which is a shopping mall in the center of Tel Aviv. The food fair contains stalls where vendors sell various types of food (Moroccan, Iraqi, Persian, Japanese, Chinese, Brazilian, Druze, Boutique Cheese, chocolate, etc.)

Thanks Zeitoun for the recipe. I am going to try and make it.


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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zeitoun   

Wolfert -

Talking about expanding someone's horizons! the only version of kibbe i knew was "kibbe tariqt'bayyi", kibbe my dad's way!! I was going through your list with amazement quite frankly. Thanks again for sharing such resourceful information! I think I will take advantage of the offer and email you a (short) list!

BTW, You mentionned you were making kibbe this week end, which recipe???????

Boaziko -

I also love Kibbe with Tahini or "Tarator" sauce as it is called in Lebanon! Thanks for mentionning it.

Hazardnc -

I am afraid i am not a great source for Koussa mehchi (stuffed zucchini). I have honestly never tried making it ALONE. I have seen my dad make it for us when we were kids but, although the concept is simple, i am afraid i might miss a thing or two in the process if i tried to explain it myslef.

And as Foodman suggested, it would make a great new thread!

Swisskaese-

Thanks for the info, please let us know how your kibbe comes out.

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Wolfert   

Zeitoun: I was originally thinking of making a tray kibbeh, but then I thought how much I like making the ovals. I'll let you know.

To anyone reading this:

I wish I had the energy to type out the instructions for making the ovals. Doesn't seem right to begin a thread without delivering all the info.

If there is anyone out there with a copy of my Eastern Mediterranean cookbook willing to do the typing, I give the ok to type and post the text from pages 265 through 269.

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FoodMan   
Zeitoun: I was originally thinking of making a tray kibbeh, but then I thought how much I like making the ovals.  I'll let you know.

To anyone reading this:

I wish I had the energy to type out the instructions for making the ovals. Doesn't seem right to begin a thread without delivering all the info.

If there is anyone out there  with a copy of my Eastern Mediterranean cookbook willing to do the typing, I  give the ok to type and post the text from  pages 265 through 269.

Paula- this list is amazing!! I've never heard of most of these preparations. Talk about versatility. Now I feel really bad about not owning this book yet.

I do not mean to brag, but the eGCI class on Lebanese cuisine has some good instructions and pictures about forming the kibbeh ovals for frying (assuming we are talking about the football-shaped ones, right?)

edit to add: the link to the class is in one of my previous posts in this thread.

Elie

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Wolfert   

Elie:

I am so sorry. I forgot you posted directions. You do remember that I adored the class and wrote you at the time. Dp you think we could transfer the information you posted to this thread? It might be very helpful: I have already received some pm's asking for recipes using shells..

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FoodMan   

Here are the instructions for the Kibbeh ovals from the eGCI class:

Kibbeh

Kibbeh is the national dish of Lebanon. The basic Kibbeh is made with minced lamb, mutton or beef mixed with spices, minced onion and burghul. It can be eaten raw, fried, baked, or grilled. Another type of Kibbeh is Potato Kibbeh which uses boiled mashed potatoes (instead of meat) and adds fresh mint to the mix as well. Below, I provide recipes for two of the most common Kibbeh preparations - the Fried (which many of you will recognize) and the baked.

Kibbeh

• 1 cup fine burghul

• 1 meduim onion, peeled

• 1lb (450g) ground beef or lamb

• 2 tsp Salt

Put the burghul in a large bowl and cover it with cold water. Let it soak for about 30 minutes then drain in a strainer while pressing down to remove as much water as possible. Return to the bowl.

Cut the onion into quarters and puree in the food processor.

Add the onion, beef (or lamb) and salt to the burghul and knead the mixture with your hands till smooth. If it becomes too sticky, add a little ice cold water till it gets smooth.

NOTE: For Raw Kibbeh cut the burghul amount by half and add 1tsp of ground Cumin to the mixture when you add the salt.

Fried Stuffed Kibbeh

Makes about 20 pieces

• 1 Recipe Kibbeh

• 2 cups meat Stuffing

• 1 small bowl of water with ice cubes in it

• Oil for frying

Making these stuffed torpedo shaped pies takes some practice and the first few you make will probably look odd or fall apart. Keep trying, and once you get the hang of it, it will become quite easy. Here are the steps to making a perfect fried Kibbeh.

Make the shell by forming a piece of the Kibbeh into a small ball, the size of a golf ball. Rub your hands with a little ice water if the ball becomes sticky while you are rolling it between your palms.

kibbe-3.jpg

Using an index finger and holding the ball in your other hand, make a tunnel in the ball. This is where the stuffing will go. Rotate the ball while “digging” the tunnel to make it an even thickness. The trick is to get the shell as thin as possible without breaking it. You should end up with a hollow, cone-shaped shell.

kibbe-4.jpg

Spoon about 2 tsp of the meat filling into the prepared shell, leaving enough room to close it.

kibbe-5.jpg

Using both hands gently close and seal the shell over the filling and, using the ice cold water as lubricant, form it into a football shaped pie.

kibbe-7.jpg

Heat about 2 inches (5cm) of oil in a deep pot to 375F (190C). Fry the Kibbeh a few at a time until they are deep brown on all sides. Drain and serve with “Yogurt Tahini Sauce”, “Cucumber Yogurt Salad” or “Tomato Salad”.

Elie

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Wolfert   

I found one of my recipes for kibbeh posted on another site. I just snatched it back and have posted it here.

Please study the photo-directions from foodman (see above) so you can make these very light and very tender kibbeh perfect the very first time.

Kibbeh Stuffed With Braised Lamb Shank, Tomatoes, and Onions.

These baby size kibbeh are a must at Damascene weddings. They are fried until brown but are not crisp lest they turn dry. Serve with an assortment of dips, including Baba Ghanoush.

Makes about 36 kibbeh

Ingredients:

For the Filling:

1 large lamb shank, trimmed of excess fat

1 small onion, minced

2 tablespoons butter or olive oil

1 tablespoon tomato paste

2 cups water

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Pinch of Syrian Mixed Spices see recipe below

For the Shell:

3 cups fine-grain bulgur

1-1/4 pounds extra-lean ground leg of lamb

3 tablespoons ice water

3 tablespoons grated red onion

Olive oil or butter-flavored oil spray

Oil for frying

Instructions:

Strip the meat off the bone and cut into 1-inch chunks. (Save the bone for some other purpose.) In a medium nonstick skillet, sauté the onion in the butter or oil over moderate heat until soft and golden, about 5 minutes. Add the meat and brown lightly. Add the tomato paste, water, salt, pepper, and spices and stir. Bring to a boil, partially cover, and cook over low heat until the meat is very tender and almost all the liquid has evaporated, about 45 minutes.

Cool the meat, then chop, shred, or pulse it 10 times in a food processor. Adjust the seasoning and chill before continuing. Makes about 1 cup filling.

Wash the bulgur in a sieve under running water, then allow it to drain. Puree the onion in the work bowl of a food processor. Add the meat and seasonings and process until smooth and pasty. Add a few tablespoons ice-cold water to the meat and process about 5 seconds, until well mixed. Add the bulgur and process for an instant. (You can do this in batches.)

Turn the mixture out onto a work surface, then knead the dough until it is smooth and pliable. Separate it into batches. Return one part to the food processor and knead in short bursts. Repeat with the second batch. (You don't want the mixture to heat up, lest it turn mushy.) Kibbeh dough should be cold, smooth, and a little sticky. Chill the dough in the refrigerator or freezer if it is soft.

Pinch off walnut-size pieces of the bulgur-meat dough to make, shape, and fill the kibbehs.

To facilitate shaping your kibbeh ovals, fill a wide, shallow bowl with cold water mixed with a tablespoon of cornstarch and a good pinch of salt. The salt inhibits the bulgur from turning mushy.

For easiest handling, wet both palms before shaping each oval and keep hands, fingers, and shell moist at all times. Pinch off a piece of the ground lamb and bulgur mixture and roll into a smooth oval.

If you are right-handed, hold the ball in your wet left hand and make a hole in it with the forefinger of your right hand. Use the palm and cupped fingers of your left hand to mold a thin, egg-shaped, smooth oval around your forefinger.

Make quick open-and-closing motions with your left hand and fingers. Meanwhile twist your entire right hand from the wrist to the forefinger, making short half turns always in a clockwise direction. Left-handed cooks carry out this operation with opposite hands. Seal any breaks by briefly dipping the shell in the prepared water, then smoothing the dough.

Quickly slip the prepared filling into the shell. Pinch ends to seal, using a few drops of cold water to bind. Use fingertips to smooth out dough. Gently squeeze the oval with wet palms to form a smooth football shape. The ovals should be thin and small. Set them out, 1/2 inch apart, on a flat tray, spray with butter-flavored oil or olive oil, cover with plastic wrap, and freeze or refrigerate until ready to cook.

Fry a half dozen kibbehs at a time in hot oil until brown but not crisp. (They can be broiled on all sides.) Serve warm or at room temperature.

Syrian Mixed Spices

This spicy mixture is especially good for seasoning meat pies, köfte, and stews.

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon Near East or Aleppo pepper, or substitute 2 teaspoons Hungarian paprika and 1 teaspoon hot Hungarian paprika

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 teaspoon ground allspice

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground coriander seeds

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

Salt

Instructions:

Mix all the ingredients well and place in a small jar. Add a little salt to keep the mixture fresh and free of bugs. Close tightly and store up to 3 months.

Yield: Makes about 2 tablespoons


Edited by Wolfert (log)

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zeitoun   

Thanks for the recipes. I know I had mentionned earlier that I would PM you with a list of recipes but I think it would be more appropriate if I just bought one of your books!! (I haven't yet, shame on me :sad: ). Amongst your published works, which book would you recommend for kibbe (that is, with a sizable list of recipes?)

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Wolfert   

Well, since you are twisting my arm, the book is the Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean. It has more than a dozen kibbeh recipes including the one above . And there are many dishes from Macedonia, Turkey, Syria and the countries beyond the Black sea.

I guess I can toot my own horn here: In 1994, the year it was published it won the James Beard award and IACP award for best International cookbook.

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zeitoun   
Well, since you are twisting my arm, the book is the Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean. It has more than a dozen kibbeh recipes including the one above . And there are many dishes from Macedonia, Turkey, Syria and the countries beyond the Black sea.

I guess I can toot my own  horn here: In 1994, the year it was published it won the James Beard award and IACP award for best International cookbook.

Hey... nothing wrong with that. A little bit of PR never hurts :raz:

Thanks again.

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