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Who is the best chef cooking in london today?


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(except Gordon Ramsay!)

Why would you not want to work for arguably the most successful chef in London at the moment? You'd get top class training and the possibilites for advancement within his organisation are huge. Better still, you'd get to work with the likes of Mark Askew, marcus Wareing, Angela Hartnet and Jason Atherton and not have to suffer the "Boiling Point" antics of the man himself. If I was young, dumb and full of...ambition, I'd be knocking on Ramsay's doors.

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Benjamin:

...More importantly... Who do YOU think is the best chef cooking in London these days? :)

Imho, Chef Michel Roux Jr at Le Gavroche is the chef/place to be ( I am bias). Most of the other top chefs were through that kitchen too (Roux Bros days)!

Try looking at the personal cooking philosophy of the chefs. Michel Roux Jr. always says "Happy Cooking". The Roux's have contacts that stretch the entire world- literally, of the finest chefs and properties. Who knows what could come of a stint there? A scholarship program (the first of it's kind), and decades of proven technique and success. Besides, they are damn nice people!

Send him your CV at 43 Upper Brook Street, Mayfair- or better yet, stop in! See for yourself. Ask questions of the others there.

The philosophy of G. Ramsay says @&*$!*$#@!- whatever... I would not only avoid Ramsay as a chef, but any of his properties as a diner! Who wants to dine on the fear and anger vibe? No matter how popular or accepted his behaviour is! I personally find it revolting. It can't help but transfer to his entourage, again, imho.

Good luck to you wherever you cook!

Paula

"...It is said that without the culinary arts, the crudeness of reality would be unbearable..." Leopold

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The philosophy of G. Ramsay says @&*$!*$#@!- whatever... I would not only avoid Ramsay as a chef, but any of his properties as a diner! Who wants to dine on the fear and anger vibe? No matter how popular or accepted his behaviour is! I personally find it revolting. It can't help but transfer to his entourage, again, imho.

Good luck to you wherever you cook!

Paula

Let it not be said that I am commenting upon Chef Gordon Ramsay's cheffy attributes or the pleasure of dining at any one of his restaurants..because I won't.

but..unrelatedly

we have a saying back home...that the food absorbs the cook's feelings..I remember from my childhood an instance where my grandfather refused to eat the food my grandmother painstakingly prepared for him while muttering angry utterances over an issue that happened outside the house...unrelated to him and some few days ago.(what can I say..she is a woman, afterall..and we never forget. as shalom aleychem once said..a woman is made of seven measures of talk.) Gastronomic superstition? Maybe. But it is nice to know that the food you are eating comes from happy cooks.

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I've only heard great things about Ramsay as a chef. He has a loyal staff and he also has a scholarship program. He is dedicated to his craft and he is also a savvy business man. A young cook could certainly learn alot in his kitchen. I've never eaten at one of his restaurants, but I've seen some of his menus and plating. I greatly admire his lack of gimmicks, he doesn't bow to trends either.

But when I first saw a blurb from one his TV shows, I though he was a comedian. LOL!

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

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we have a saying back home...that the food absorbs the cook's feelings..

I believe that to be true. Given that I have eaten Ramsay's food and that of his proteges a number of times and greatly enjoyed it, it follows that he must fundamentally be a good man and that the temper he is renowned for is for the sake of expediency in the kitchen alone.

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we have a saying back home...that the food absorbs the cook's feelings..

I believe that to be true. Given that I have eaten Ramsay's food and that of his proteges a number of times and greatly enjoyed it, it follows that he must fundamentally be a good man and that the temper he is renowned for is for the sake of expediency in the kitchen alone.

Or perhaps the temper he is now renowned for is for the sake of a carefully crafted media persona. IMHO Ramsey is no longer a chef, he's a celebrity.

Suzi Edwards aka "Tarka"

"the only thing larger than her bum is her ego"

Blogito ergo sum

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I've worked for Gordon Ramsay, At Petrus, Hospital Road and we open claridges.

Looking for something a bit special, plus gavroche has a 1 year waiting list for chefs and think they are a little bit 'old school' - same old techniques and there restaurant is more of a gentlemans club than a gastronomic fiesta! from what I hear Aikens is not really working that much in the kitchen anymore and leaves it to his sous chef, and I learn't from Ramsays that its not worth all the effort if your not working with the big man just the big name! What I want to find is a "ramsay when he was at the aubergine" type situtation - someone with passion, inspiration and on a mission - but don't think these types of chefs are cooking anymore!

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What I want to find is a "ramsay when he was at the aubergine" type situtation - someone with passion, inspiration and on a mission - but don't think these types of chefs are cooking anymore!

Maybe Bjorn at The Greenhouse could show you sonething new, otherwise I'd suggest outside London and Claude Bosi. Or there's always Heston of course. or maybe its time for you to be the "Ramsay at Aubergine" type of chef. I'd come amd eat at your place if you were.

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That makes two of us. What's for dinner?

Wih Chavot or Aikens, you at least find a connection back to Koffman.

Why London? What about applying to L'Enclume or Anthony's? And if not there, then perhaps it's worth thinking about across the channel.

Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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That makes two of us. What's for dinner?

Wih Chavot or Aikens, you at least find a connection back to Koffman.

Why London? What about applying to L'Enclume or Anthony's? And if not there, then perhaps it's worth thinking about across the channel.

Funnily enough i'm working with a chef from Aikens and a Chef from The Capital and they have taught me some of the skills, recipes and techniques they have learn't during there time with them. I tried anthonys but he has just employed a new chef and the kitchen is "full" but he said if there is a space i'm first on the list! Think to be 'the Chef' (not sure i'm ready for that just yet!...) or go overseas is the option!

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For as bastard of a kitchen to work in, and a man without the stars, what about Piege at Crillon? Also, I hear Le Maurice is supposed to be an excellent up-and-comer.

L'Enclume is obviously going to be very special.

But couldn't Ramsay (if you're still on speaking terms) get you into Guy Savoy (or Daniel in New York for that matter - or Cafe Boulud, which is supposed to be superior cooking)? Surely from there you could get a placement almost anywhere.

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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  • 3 weeks later...
Looking for a new job but not really sure who to work with! who is the best chef cooking in london at the moment in your opinions! (except Gordon Ramsay!)

Thanks

I would concur with Eric Chavot. On an upcoming trip to Paris, we're stopping off briefly in London specifically to dine at The Capitol. Well worth the trip.

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Looking for a new job but not really sure who to work with! who is the best chef cooking in london at the moment in your opinions! (except Gordon Ramsay!)

Thanks

I would concur with Eric Chavot. On an upcoming trip to Paris, we're stopping off briefly in London specifically to dine at The Capitol. Well worth the trip.

Welcome. I stopped off briefly at The Capitol recently only to lose my briefs.

So please dish.

Jamie

P.S. Are you clairvoyent?

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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we have a saying back home...that the food absorbs the cook's feelings..

I believe that to be true. Given that I have eaten Ramsay's food and that of his proteges a number of times and greatly enjoyed it, it follows that he must fundamentally be a good man and that the temper he is renowned for is for the sake of expediency in the kitchen alone.

Or perhaps the temper he is now renowned for is for the sake of a carefully crafted media persona. IMHO Ramsey is no longer a chef, he's a celebrity.

He's more than a celebrity. He's a comedian and a clown. He uses his sizeable talents (yes I think the man is a talented chef, a purist when it comes to food and presentation and he seems to care about mentoring the next generation of chefs). BUT, BUT he abuses his talents and his fame to demean people in front of the cameras. And the lame ducks who take it go a long way in substantiiating his attitude. Chef Ramsay may act like a chest thumping rude ape, but the bigger asses are the ones who "take" it.

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Paul Gaylor at The Lanesborough is the Guv'nor. If not demonstrably The Best, he is undoubtedly the most underrated chef working in London. Although he may not have the profile of some of the chaps mentioned above and, obviously, he's managing a big hotel brigade, Gaylor has a real culinary intelligence, born of a genuine love of food, deep knowledge, and an amazing memory! He's also a thoroughly nice chap with a delightfully coarse turn of phrase.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Looking for a new job but not really sure who to work with! who is the best chef cooking in london at the moment in your opinions! (except Gordon Ramsay!)

Thanks

Bejamin,

Are you still looking for a place? if so could you also let me know where you have worked before? it would make it easier for me to sudgest a chef to you.

I have worked with Nico Ladenis, Piere Koffman, Alistair Little, Gordon Ramsay and Marco Piere White as well as briefly at two of Alain Ducasse's establishments amongst others.

It is a good idea to have some directon and planning in your CV and career path, any way let me know

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I don't know if he is the best chef in London, but I'd say Adam Byatt at Thyme is doing some really interesting stuff. He also has an amazing kitchen (a completely seperate area for starters for example with induction hobs so the cold stuff doesn't get affected by the heat of the main range and a huge pastry area) which I would imagine would be a joy to work in.

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I've worked for Gordon Ramsay, At Petrus, Hospital Road and we open claridges.

Looking for something a bit special, plus gavroche has a 1 year waiting list for chefs and think they are a little bit 'old school' - same old techniques and there restaurant is more of a gentlemans club than a gastronomic fiesta! from what I hear Aikens is not really working that much in the kitchen anymore and leaves it to his sous chef, and I learn't from Ramsays that its not worth all the effort if your not working with the big man just the big name! What I want to find is a "ramsay when he was at the aubergine" type situtation - someone with passion, inspiration and on a mission - but don't think these types of chefs are cooking anymore!

I worked at Aubergine when Ramsay was there, and I think I know what you mean, you want t work for a great Chef that is still building his reputation, if this is the case I would recomend you ask Andre Garret at the Orrery for a postistion. If you want to see the Menus check them out on www.conran.com.

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