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They were shaguars (and I mean that with all the respect and non-mysoginistic sincerety I can muster to convey to a fellow industroid for immediate empathy).

No letters, please...

Thank you so much for the laugh. Greatly needed. Um..I know quite a few of those and I'm sorry!

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Hey Neil, I'm thinking about popping in on Saturday, say round eight? Party'll be for between four and eight, hell better get a ten top ready just in case. A few couples might be late, just just keep things on ice until we get there. We're going to be celebrating one of the groups one year of sobriety, so please, no wine list it'd be an affront to the occasion.

Oh yeah, a couple of the group will are Vegans, so whip something up for them, 'kay? I'll email you seperately a list of what the group is allergic to/won't eat/don't like, I'm sure you'll accomodate. And I've got a couple substitutions I'd like made to the menu, I'll call you separetly about that.

We're going to be bring a cake, so please ensure the dessert is subtracted off our bill. And when you cut it, please put it on some nice plates, no crap, okay? And a little ice cream would be nice on the side as a garnish.

Don't make me call Ian.

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Hey Neil, I'm thinking about popping in on Saturday, say round eight? Party'll be for between four and eight, hell better get a ten top ready just in case. A few couples might be late, just just keep things on ice until we get there. We're going to be celebrating one of the groups one year of sobriety, so please, no wine list it'd be an affront to the occasion. 

Oh yeah, a couple of the group will are Vegans, so whip something up for them, 'kay? I'll email you  seperately a list of what the group is allergic to/won't eat/don't like, I'm sure you'll accomodate. And I've got a couple substitutions I'd like made to the menu, I'll call you separetly about that.

We're going to be bring a cake, so please ensure the dessert is subtracted off our bill. And when you cut it, please put it on some nice plates, no crap, okay? And a little ice cream would be nice on the side as a garnish. 

Don't make me call Ian.

Will you be bringing the lesser Talents ? Highchairs, booster seats, Taser ?

Laugh it up but you don't know how close to the truth that is sometimes. You should see the list I have for what different people can eat and not eat at the wine tastings ! Or the ten course wine dinner, announcing as they arrive what the "allergy D'jour" is. ( I think I am allergic to something so I am checking different items each day - Today is garlic, leeks, onions and black pepper ! I shit you not !)

I am all for trying to take care of every little thing people have at any time, but sometimes the answer is no. Not out of spite, but just out of respect of the other 90 diners in the room and not making them wait for dinner while I stop the train to deal with your request. There are nights that if someone asked me to stand on my head and spit nickels while doing it, no problem, there will be a charge for that ! And sometimes, you just can't.

Sorry, and how many vegans in total was that ? :biggrin:

Neil Wyles

Hamilton Street Grill

www.hamiltonstreetgrill.com

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You overplayed your hand Neil, all sympathy for you is disappearing. There is no way in hell anyone, anywhere on this earth claims to be allergic to leeks. You need to copy Jeffery Steingartens section on food allergies, pass it out to the afflicted, then make them pass a quiz on the topic prior to the menu changes being made. I'm of the camp that says food allergies don't exist, except in exceedingly rare cases, and 99.999999% of them are pereptrated by selfish self-absorbed babies.

And don't even get me started on kids and peanuts.

If you go to a restaurant, you eat what the chef puts in front of you. If you don't like it, don't go back.

One of the funniest things I saw on the Food Network was on that "Into the Fire" show when the episode was about Disneyland. At the "fine dining" restaurant they have a chefs menu, essentially a tasting menu created at hte chefs discretion, what's the Japanese word for chefs chioice? okasame? something to that effect. Anyway, some dumbassed couple, and seriously, I'm already highly skeptical about two GROWN ADULTS at Disneyland, no kids in tow, when the husband pipes up "we don't like green peppers." I think I screamed SHUT THE F...UP at my TV at that point. I was equally exasperated by the customers, precious tatsebuds can't handle green peppers, and the chef for not immediately either kicking them out, or quitting his job.

I wonder if my story had a point at some time, reading back I can't really see where I was going with the whole thing. Oh well, I've typed it now, it stays. I guess the moral is eat whta's put in front of you, and push to the side things you don't like, how hard is that?

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You overplayed your hand Neil, all sympathy for you is disappearing. There is no way in hell anyone, anywhere on this earth claims to be allergic to leeks. You need to copy Jeffery Steingartens section on food allergies, pass it out to the afflicted, then make them pass a quiz on the topic prior to the menu changes being made. I'm of the camp that says food allergies don't exist, except in exceedingly rare cases, and 99.999999% of them are pereptrated by selfish self-absorbed babies.

And don't even get me started on kids and peanuts.   

If you go to a restaurant, you eat what the chef puts in front of you. If you don't like it, don't go back.

One of the funniest things I saw on the Food Network was on that "Into the Fire" show when the episode was about Disneyland. At the "fine dining" restaurant they have a chefs menu, essentially a tasting menu created at hte chefs discretion, what's the Japanese word for chefs chioice? okasame? something to that effect. Anyway, some dumbassed couple, and  seriously, I'm already highly skeptical about two GROWN ADULTS at Disneyland, no kids in tow, when the husband pipes up "we don't like green peppers." I think I screamed SHUT THE F...UP at my TV at that point. I was equally exasperated by the customers, precious tatsebuds can't handle green peppers, and the chef for not immediately either kicking them out, or quitting his job. 

I wonder if my story had a point at some time, reading back I can't really see where I was going with the whole thing. Oh well, I've typed it now, it stays. I guess the moral is eat whta's put in front of you, and push to the side things you don't like, how hard is that?

I think you perhaps doubt the validity of my previous statement. To that I have one thing to say.

Sir, my restaurant is in YALETOWN ! ( home of pocket dogs in bags, real Prada, "feigned " food problem, every new wacky diet while still insisting to dine out, $99.00 loaves of bread that actually get sold, a leased fleet of Brian Jessel vehicles, two Botox clinics, 15 Spas, A tea shop that sells Norweigian Jazz on the side, 25 hair salons and 6 cosmetic "dentists" )

P.S. Shall you be needing that table all night ? Meyer lemons for your hot water ?

Neil Wyles

Hamilton Street Grill

www.hamiltonstreetgrill.com

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I hate Yaletown.

Actually, I like Yaletown, just have a problem with the people therein. If I have to hear one more time how good that new elementary school is, I'll kill a vegan.

Oh, and here's a tip for you fashionistas. Your precious Urbane Faire is a Save On Foods with double markup. There's nothing at Urban Faire that isn't stocked at half the price at any Richmond Save On except for that one stupid loaf of bread everyone is so taken with. And the Roundhouse isn't really round.

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And don't even get me started on kids and peanuts.   

I'd like to hear you riff on peanut allergies........ :hmmm:

sarah

Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was. --Unknown

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Oh, and here's a tip for you fashionistas. Your precious Urbane Faire is a Save On Foods with double markup. There's nothing at Urban Faire that isn't stocked at half the price at any Richmond Save On except for that one stupid loaf of bread everyone is so taken with.

Actually, have you seen the bakery section? The selection of baked goodies is much better at Urban Fare (I'm partial to the pecan tart), and they have the exotic fruits section too, not to mention the oils and vinegars.

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Sheesh, we have made our beds and we must sleep in them...but it's true, this town is ripe with a wide variety of anti-diners.

I agree that Yaletown stands out like a church spire in representing the symptoms of a city that has grown up too quickly. The self-styled urban sophisticates haven't completed the self-image they yearn for just yet. There is much to learn, as Yoda would say (he would have been an awesome hostess).

Though the mini driving lulu-losers (as they are often known) may spa as much as they tan and their iPods may brim with the same downtempo thump-thump-thumps as the yupsters of midtown Manhattan, they are still a view Pradas short of graduation in my opinion. Though they claim the high ground as ambassadors of west coast uber-hip, as the urban pioneers of our city's future, they sure as hell don't know how to go out and eat. Figure that one out, shaguars, and i'll turn you off cosmos and kirs at no extra charge. Sex and the City was just a show...and those gals knew how to tip (Samantha! :wub: )

To be sure, we have our fair share of real diners, the guys and dolls who know what they're doing, who make reservations and show up for them and who have enough self-assuredness to ask for help with a wine list (rather than ordering shiraz with their halibut only to complain their fish was tasteless), but there is a glaring deficit apparent to those on the front lines.

They are still a few skyscrapers short of being what they want to be, but knowing how to behave in the realm of restaurants is just another brick in the wall. :smile:

Andrew Morrison

Food Columnist | The Westender

Editor & Publisher | Scout Magazine

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I once had a customer who claimed she was allergic to salt. Anything with salt in it, on it, salt. She would DIE if she ingested salt. I had to bite my tongue so hard. Was that ever fun telling to the kitchen..

"Never eat more than you can lift" -Miss Piggy

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I am sensing some tension here... I know I try to be a good diner.

But seriously - I am a person who does'nt drink - just cannot hold my alcohol. But I do feel bad just having water - and I would like to order something else - but soda's and cola's seem very sad and kind of mess up the taste of a serious dinner.

I asked this before - but what would be good manners to order - short of a shirley temple or a virgin version of a cocktail. Bottled water?

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I am sensing some tension here... I know I try to be a good diner.

But seriously - I am a person who does'nt drink - just cannot hold my alcohol.  But I do feel bad just having water - and I would like to order something else - but soda's and cola's seem very sad and kind of mess up the taste of a serious dinner. 

I asked this before - but what would be good manners to order - short of a shirley temple or a virgin version of a cocktail.  Bottled water?

I tend to go for, say, iced coffee or maybe an interesting soda. I was so happy when Mission Springs started brewing their own root beer - I want to appreciate their brewing with my meal, but I might barely make it through a beer. A couple root beers, that I can do. I'm always the one driving, and I want something that goes with my meal, but alcohol's pretty much out of the question for me. I'd like to suggest that more restaurants have something special and non-alcoholic. I heard some time ago about a pretentious tea company trying to do cold/iced tea pairings for food, perhaps that's something that could be explored and both prep and a decent markup would be easy. Maybe some varietal or estate teas... it'd be an interesting change and give the non-drinkers an option. I know when I get an appropriate option, (like Havana's mango shake or Banana Leaf's thai coffee and tea) I take it. So why aren't there more options out there?

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I asked this before - but what would be good manners to order - short of a shirley temple or a virgin version of a cocktail.  Bottled water?

In a fine dining setting, I'd opt for a quality bottled water, like San Pellegrino.

I know a man who gave up smoking, drinking, sex, and rich food. He was healthy right up to the day he killed himself. - Johnny Carson
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I asked this before - but what would be good manners to order - short of a shirley temple or a virgin version of a cocktail.  Bottled water?

In a fine dining setting, I'd opt for a quality bottled water, like San Pellegrino.

I agree completely ... especially having been to Costco tonight and knowing what I can pay for a case of 12 750ml bottles!!

A.

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Two ladies, three courses, two coffees, no wine. Bill: $55.00 Duration of stay: 6pm to 11:00pm, 5 freakin' hours, the last three and a half of which were filled by idle chit chat and two pots of free coffee. Tip? $5.  :angry:

It's their right, I know. But several things are wrong with this on a manners front...and to do this during DOV should be a five minute major.

Five minute major for a $5 tip? Lifetime imprisonment and/or Dangerous Offender status seems more appropriate... :laugh:

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

www.leecarney.com

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I'm posting this for a brighter outlook...last night a server came to the kitchen to request just a scoop of raspberry sorbetto for his diners, "If that's okay because they are too full to eat the dessert off the tasting menu." Anything that shaves a few seconds off my time is very well appreciated.

"One chocolate truffle is more satisfying than a dozen artificially flavored dessert cakes." Darra Goldstein, Gastronomica Journal, Spring 2005 Edition

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I'm of the camp that says food allergies don't exist, except in exceedingly rare cases, and 99.999999% of them are pereptrated by selfish self-absorbed babies.

This is in defense of all people with allergies...

Food allergies do exist and for some people like myself, they can be extremely unpleasant! That being said, there are some general rules that people with an allergy should abide by.

If someone has a food allergy, generally they know about it long befoe they get to a restaurant. I generally call ahead (as much as 3 to 4 days depending how far out I am planning) and let the restaurant know that I will be coming in for dinner and that I have allergies to wheat and dairy. With advance notice, most restaurants are more than capable of adjusting a menu or creating a dish that meets my requirements. I have been to four restaurants thus far for DOV and each one has taken great effort to provide me with a great meal - but all were very appreciative of the advance notice.

A food allergy can be very unpleasant, especially for someone who loves to eat out as much as I do. I would prefer to not have an allergy and rememeber the days when I could eat whatever I want, but that is not the case now. It has changed my travel patterns, and limited my sweet tooth, but it is because of the great chefs in Vancouver that I am still able to indulge in my passion for food on a frequent basis.

The bottom line is that it is all about respecting the restaurant and its staff. Other than a couple of exceptions in Vancouver, I have encountered very few restaurants that cannot cater to a special diet, and if given the appropriate notice, they generally do such a fantastic job that my dining companions comment that they wish they had an allergy too!

Please don't lump all of us together will the self-absobed people who just don't like something and tell you at the last minute!

Cheers,

Eric

(a.k.a. MrGourmet)

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Eric - Nice new handle !

Had a woman in last night allergic to eggs. No problem. Orders salmon. No problem.

Sends it back, having a reaction, wants another. Same thing. This frustrates me as I take special care to make sure allergies are respected and work with the person to make sure they get something they enjoy. As you have dined in my restaurant, you know this is the case.

I would have had to have gone to the cooler to get an egg for there to be any egg in that. Salmon, potatoes, butter, whip cream, garlic and vegetables. Period. Is she allergic to anything else ? Perhaps. This was frustrating as not only did I throw two perfectly good meals away ( the second because now she was not hungry ), I also did not charge her for her either meal, my wife sent up a gift certificate to smooth over her dining companions for the discomfort they felt during the scene.

Am I tarring everybody with the same brush. Not at all. Just expressing a frustration that I have to work with. On the bright side, it is not one I have to live with.

Neil Wyles

Hamilton Street Grill

www.hamiltonstreetgrill.com

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Allergies are a fact of life. Believe it or not, most servers worth a damn find it a welcome challenge to accomodate special requests. It makes us feel less like automatons, doing the same thing over and over. It makes us feel like we're providing a special service.

Tipping aside, going that extra mile is it's own reward. :wink:

That being said, Vancity is awash with picky eaters who claim allergic status. They outright lie. They're often referred to as a bullshit allergies. With modern POS systems, servers will even type in on their bill to the kitchen, "no garlic - bullshit allergy".

These folks are usually easy to spot and should be drawn and quartered, slapped on a rack and served as a special.

(waiterblog does not advocate violence, only poor metaphors, similes, and hyperboles :raz: ).

Andrew Morrison

Food Columnist | The Westender

Editor & Publisher | Scout Magazine

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