Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

This is a parsi mithai called Hagan Nu Ladoo, which is distributed to guests after a cerenomy marking the 7th month of an unborn child. Tastes sort of like a Gudi Ladoo, but has a denser flavor and seems to have more nuts (cashews and pistachios). This one is also topped with thin edible silver foil.

gallery_21049_162_1106420168.jpg

Another Parsi sweet called Malido. This is a typical offerings during prayers. It consists of (wheat?) flour, butter, sugar, nuts and golden rasins.

gallery_21049_162_1106420195.jpg

Edited by percyn (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is another delightful box of mithai someone visiting India brought for me. This was from a special place and it was unlike any other mithai I have ever had. I will be posting more detail on this later.

gallery_21049_162_1105922102.jpg

Shanta, I might have a few recipes, which I will dig up and post.

Link to post
Share on other sites

you guys are KILLING me with those lovely lovely pictures.

a cross between food porn and food torture.....

here i am on a strict diet!

i was the kind of person who could eat anything and stay thin,

so i never developed self-control re food.

suddenly last year i porked out.

even if i LOOKED at food i gained weight.

had to buy all new pants as could not fit into old wardrobe.

went to doctor and they said:

"madam, you have crossed XX years, what do you expect?

metabolism will slow down and you need to adjust accordingly".

haaaii....

milagai

Link to post
Share on other sites

Percy,

Our boxes look the same, dont they? I dont know where my mithai came from so please tell me more about your box. Your Malido looks like it is homemade, it's been a long time I had one. :wub:

Pan,

Mithai is a term that encompasses the entire gamut of solid and semi solid Indian sweets. On the other hand a Falooda(Chendol like), Kulfi, Payasam, Kheer may not be covered in the same ambit.

Everyone, any holes in this theory? :hmmm:

Milagai,

It's better to feast on these zero calorie X rated pics than visit a mithai shop. :biggrin: I still remember your lamentations on Mangoes, wait another 4 months.

Bague,

Doesn't Belgium have any Indian shops that sell Mithai? There must be so many Palanpuri Gujaratis who are in the Diamond trade.

Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

Milagai,

It's better to feast on these zero calorie X rated pics than visit a mithai shop. :biggrin: I still remember your lamentations on Mangoes, wait another 4 months.

jee haan Episure!

I am trying to base my diet on Birbal ki Khichdi!!

here is a link for those unfamiliar with the stories of

the greatest Mughal Emperor Akbar and

his court philosopher / wise man / jester Birbal:

http://www.geocities.com/shishusansar/birbal/birbal41.htm

Milagai

Link to post
Share on other sites
Percy,

Our boxes look the same, dont they? I dont know where my mithai came from so please tell me more about your box. Your Malido looks like it is homemade, it's been a long time I had one. :wub:

Episure, all I know is that my Aunt got this from a "special" place and this mithai was unlike any other I have ever had. I will try to get more info from her. The Malido is from a small parsi community store that makes these in small batches (per orders they recieve), so its close to home made. I will post a recipe for Malido if you are interested.

In the meantime, here is a pic of some Kaju Katri

gallery_21049_162_1106798190.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am loving the beautiful pics! One place I visited recently in Delhi is Haldiram's, where there was an overwhelmingly large selection of mithai:

gallery_18726_593_1106835189.jpg

gallery_18726_593_1106835038.jpg

I unfortunately didn't leave a lot of room for mithai after chowing down on chaat and other savory goodies, but we did take home some sweets. Don't know if this counts as mithai, but I really loved a sweet called gewar (spelling?!). Honeycomb-like in texture, it was crispy and creamy without being cloyingly sweet. That description will be reserved for something else I tried called chum chum. Boy did that shock my sweet tooth! Next time, I'll use some advice I received too late - to squeeze out some of the sugar syrup from those soaked desserts!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Percy,

I'll be delighted if you post a recipe for a malido, if it's not much bother.Thanks.

Milagai,

Birbal ki khichdi is right. :laugh: I'm sure some Ocular exercises like viewing mithai pictures will burn some calories.

Bague,

Sharp of you to catch zee figue roulades in the picture. :biggrin:

Gingerpeach,

Did you have a milk soaked ghevar or plain? Did it conform to a 'bottom of the pan' shape? And I agree with you, chamcham and it's kins should be squeezed dry of the syrup. From your pics I can make out that you had a swell time in Delhi. :smile:

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gingerpeach,

<snip> ....From your pics I can make out that you had a swell time in Delhi. :smile:  <snip>

Still am, thanks :biggrin:. I had samples of both the milk-soaked kind and the plain kind; both were pan-shaped. My preference would have been to take home the milky one, but given the overindulgence at Haldiram's we "settled" for the plain. Any must-try sweets while I'm here in Delhi? I've already had all kinds of halwa, barfi, jalebis, gulab jamun and assorted relatives of cham cham, but there's always room for more!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmmm.... I guess "Indian sweets" could be called mithai, but not all sweet things (e.g. sugar) are mithai  :wacko: ... does that make sense?

Yes, that does make sense.

I'm curious what's in the Kaju Katri. Do you make that?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gingerpeach

Any must-try sweets while I'm here in Delhi? I've already had all kinds of halwa, barfi, jalebis, gulab jamun and assorted relatives of cham cham, but there's always room for more!

I think you shouldn't miss a Sohan Papri/Pateesa which is a flaky mithai.

Have you tried a pani puri/golgappa?(It's not a mithai)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Episure and da_coolestofall for the mithai suggestions.

Episure, I did have the chance to try pani puri at a wedding. While I liked the combination of flavors, I think the texture will be an acquired thing for me. Haven't quite gotten used to the watery + crunchy combination yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmmm.... I guess "Indian sweets" could be called mithai, but not all sweet things (e.g. sugar) are mithai  :wacko: ... does that make sense?

Yes, that does make sense.

I'm curious what's in the Kaju Katri. Do you make that?

Kaju = Cashew, Katri = diamond shape (I think).

Thus, Kaju Katri is really ground up cashews and sugar...sort of like a marizpan, but with cashews instead of almonds.

It is quite common and can be found in most Indian grocery stores.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Percy,

I'll be delighted if you post a recipe for a malido, if it's not much bother.Thanks.

<snip>

This Malido recipe is from Jamva Chaloji (Shrinbai Panthaky's Malido, serves 10-12):

2 cups rava or semolina

1 cup wheat flour

3 cups sugar

6 eggs (optional)

25 gms almonds, boiled, sliced and fried

25 gms charoli, fried

25 gms rasins, fried

50 gms orange peel

25 gms sugar crystals

25 gms jujubes

1 tbsp cardamom - nutmeg powder

2 tablespoon extra pure ghee (for rotis)

500 gms pure ghee

1 tbsp vanilla essence

Hey, nobody said this was diet food :shock:

- Mix the rava and wheat flour with 2 tbsp ghee and one cup water. Mix and knead into a firm dough. Make 5 rotis and fry them. When cooled, pound them into a powder.

- Make a syrup with 3 cups sugar and 2 cups water. On a low flame add the roti powder. Keep stirring while slowly adding all the ghee, a bit at a time. When completed, remove from heat to cool a little.

- If using eggs, whisk and pour into the mixture in a thin stream, while stirring the mixture. Simmer and stir for 15 - 20 minutes. Remove from heat and add cardamon and nutmeg powder and vanilla essence. Stir in half the nuts, orange peel and raisins.

- Transfer to serving dish and top with remaining nuts, raisins, orange peel, jujubes and sugar crystals

- Promise to mail me some if you make it :biggrin:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • Similar Content

    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
    • By Deeps
      This is one of my daughter favorite dishes, being mild and less spicy she loves this rice dish.  Its super easy to make and goes well with most Indian curries.
      Do try this out and I am sure you will be happy with the results.
       

       
      Prep Time : 5 mins
      Cook Time: 5 mins
      Serves: 2
       
      Ingredients:
      1 cup rice(basmati), cooked
      1/2 cup coconut, shredded or grated
      1 green chili, slit
      1 dried red chili
      1 1/2 tablespoon oil/ghee(clarified butter)
      1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
      1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
      1/2 tablespoon chana dal(split chickpeas)
      1/2 tablespoon urad dal(split black gram)
      1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped
      A pinch of hing (asafoetida)
      Few curry leaves
      Salt to taste
       
      Directions
      1) Heat oil/ghee(clarified butter) in a pan in medium flame. I used coconut oil here because it tastes best for this dish.
      2) Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, chana dal(split chickpeas), urad dal(split black gram), green chili, dried red chili, ginger and curry leaves. Fry this for 30 seconds in medium flame. The trick is to ensure that these are fried but not burned.
      3) Add a pinch of hing(asafoetida) and mix well.
      4) Now add the cooked rice and coconut. Stir well for about 15 to 20 seconds and switch off the flame.
      5) Finally add salt into this and mix well. You could add peanuts or cashew nuts if you prefer. Goes well with most curries.
    • By loki
      Sweet Eggplant Pickle

      This is an Indian pickle, some would call a chutney, that I made up from several sources and my own tastes. It is based it on my favorite sweet brinjal (eggplant here in the US) pickle available commercially. It has onion and garlic, which are often omitted in some recipes due to dietary restrictions of some religious orders. It also has dates which I added on my own based on another pickle I love. I also used olive oil as mustard oil is not available and I like it's taste in these pickles. Use other oils if you like. This has more spices than the commercial type - and I think it's superior. I avoided black mustard seed, fenugreek, and cumin because almost all other pickles use these and they start to taste the same. One recipe from Andhra Pradesh used neither and I followed it a little. It's wonderful with all sorts of Indian foods - and also used for many other dishes, especially appetizers.
      SPICE MIX (Masala)
      4 Tbs coriander seeds
      3 hot chilies (I used a very hot Habanero type, so use more if you use others)
      18 cardamom pods
      2 inches cinnamon
      24 cloves
      1 1/2 Tbs peppercorns
      MAIN INGREDIENTS
      1 cups olive oil
      4 inches fresh ginger, minced fine, about 1/2 cup
      6 cloves garlic, minced
      1 large onion finely chopped
      3 lb eggplant, diced, 1/4 inch cubes
      1/2 lb chopped dates
      1 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
      2 cups rice vinegar (4.3 percent acidity or more)
      2 cups brown sugar
      2 Tbs salt
      2 tsp citric acid
      Spice Mix (Masala)

      1. Dry roast half the coriander seeds in a pan till they begin to brown slightly and become fragrant - do not burn. Cool.

      2. Put roasted and raw coriander seeds and all the other spices in a spice mill and grind till quite fine, or use a mortar and pestle. Put aside.

      Main Pickle

      1. Heat half the oil and fry ginger till slightly browned, slowly.

      2. Add garlic, onion, and half the salt and fry slowly till these begin to brown a bit too.

      3. Add eggplant, turmeric, and spice mix (Masala) and combine well. Fry for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

      4. Add rest of ingredients, including rest of the salt and olive oil and heat slowly to a boil.

      5. Boil for about 5 minutes. Add a little water if too thick - it should be nearly covered with liquid, but not quite - it will thin upon cooking so wait to add the water till heated through.

      6. Bottle in sterilized jars and seal according to your local pickling instructions. This recipe will be sufficiently acidic.
    • By loki
      Sour Tomatillo Achar

      Made this one up from a recipe for lemons. It really works for tomatilloes. A unique spice mix, and really sour for a 'different' type of pickle, or achar. It is based on a Marwari recipe - from the arid north-western part of India. Tomatilloes are not used in India (or at least not much) but are quite productive plants in my garden while lemons or other sour fruits are not possible to grow here. No vinegar or lemon juice is used, because tomatilloes are very acidic and don't need any extra.

      Ingredients
      3 lbs tomatilloes husks removed and quartered
      1/4 cup salt
      1 Tbs black mustard seeds
      2 star anise buds
      10 dried chilies (I used very hot yellow peppers)
      1 tsp fenugreek seeds
      2 inch ginger (ground to a paste)
      2 TBL dark brown sugar
      1/2 cup sugar

      1. In a large bowl, put the tomatilloes and sprinkle salt over them. Cover it and leave for a day, mixing occasionally.

      2. Next day drain the tomatilloes.

      3. Dry roast the star anise (put in first as these take longer, the black mustard, and the chilie pods (add last and barely brown in places). Cool.

      4. Grind the roasted spices with the fenugreek and put aside.

      5. Add tomatilloes, ginger, sugars, and everything else to a large pan and heat to boiling.

      6. Cook till fully hot and boiling.

      7. Fill half-pint jars and seal.
    • By rxrfrx
      South Indian Style Broccoli
      Serves 2 as Main Dish.
      Broccoli isn't a traditional Indian vegetable, but I designed this recipe to use up leftover boiled broccoli in the style of cauliflower.

      3 c broccoli, cut up and cooked
      3 T oil
      2 T cumin seeds
      2 tsp tumeric
      2 tsp corriander powder
      2 green chilis, sliced thinly
      1/2 c chopped cilantro
      salt, to taste

      Fry the spices in the oil until they smoke a little. Add the broccoli and chilis and fry for a couple minutes to get the flavors mixed. Add salt to taste and stir in the cilantro before serving with chapati.
      Bonus recipe: just before adding the cilantro, crack 2-4 eggs into the pan and stir them around.
      Keywords: Main Dish, Side, Easy, Vegan, Vegetables, Indian
      ( RG2107 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...