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Thomas Keller's "Bouchon" Cookbook


Bond Girl
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Windy, all these look perfect!

How was the sorbet?

I also am planning on making the trout soon. It is funny how some people, including myself think that the picture in the book looks awsome. Others, like my dear wife, insist on removing the head before serving it because it just looks "alive" :smile:.

Bond Girl- I do not have the book in front of me, but I believe he asks for Fromage Blanc not cream cheese for the cheesecake. Where did you get it from? Or did you have a handy substitute?

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Thanks, everyone!

I was really surprised too how easy the trotters were once I got going. Since it is just two of us, it was extra nice to be able to eat it over two days. I'll definitely add it to my list of dinners to make for guests.

Mallet - I actually had them bone it for me at the market. I have no clue on how to bone a fish so I'm glad they did it for me. The fish was very tender and delicious. The recipe in the book was great in that it let me know the fish was going to look like it wasn't done but that the beans placed on top would finish the cooking process. I'm not very confident about cooking fish, so I don't do it too often, but I'll definitely try this one again.

FoodMan - The sorbet turned out well. It was very strawberry-y. I think the only thing I might do is reduce the sugar just a little bit. It was almost too sweet for me but I may be just trying to eat too much of it at once. :smile: I purchased a Kitchen Aid ice cream maker attachment a while back and used it for the first time with the sorbet. It worked pretty well.

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I do not have the book in front of me, but I believe he asks for Fromage Blanc not cream cheese for the cheesecake. Where did you get it from? Or did you have a handy substitute?

Elie

Elie, I find fromage blanc at Whole Paycheck (Foods) Vermont Butter makes one now.......

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  • 1 month later...

Last night I made that wonderful roast chicken again, this time I also brined it first. This hands down is the best roast chiken I've ever had. It cooks to perfection in the searing 475F degrees and results in a great taste, texture, crispy skin and mahogany color.

I also made for the first time the herb gnocchi and served them in a similar manner to the recipe with summer squash and tomatoes. I used some fresh white corn as well though and did not add the olives.

I also made a sauce from the pan drippings with stock, lemon juice and a little butter at the end.

gallery_5404_94_18727.jpg

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Great picture.

That brined roast chicken is awesome, it packs a whole lot of flavor and the skin is just absolutely disgusting. I love it!

I also like the really simple roast chicken and his instructions to be sure to carve the chicken and eat the oysters immediately. They are both awesome roast chicken recipes. I do the simple one about once a week. It’s my idea of a hobby.

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Great picture.

That brined roast chicken is awesome, it packs a whole lot of flavor and the skin is just absolutely disgusting. I love it!

I also like the really simple roast chicken and his instructions to be sure to carve the chicken and eat the oysters immediately. They are both awesome roast chicken recipes. I do the simple one about once a week. It’s my idea of a hobby.

Is this a typo or did u really mean the skin is disgusting???! The skin comes out crispy and wonderful.

Usually I make the simple roast chicken as well with no brining. Mainly because I never think about it ahead of time.

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Great picture.

That brined roast chicken is awesome, it packs a whole lot of flavor and the skin is just absolutely disgusting. I love it!

I also like the really simple roast chicken and his instructions to be sure to carve the chicken and eat the oysters immediately. They are both awesome roast chicken recipes. I do the simple one about once a week. It’s my idea of a hobby.

Is this a typo or did u really mean the skin is disgusting???! The skin comes out crispy and wonderful.

Usually I make the simple roast chicken as well with no brining. Mainly because I never think about it ahead of time.

Elie

I often use language in bizarre and unintelligible ways. What I mean is that the skin is disgustingly good. It’s some of the best chicken skin I’ve had. It hardly gets any better.

I need to re-examine my use of that word in print. In my speech, I usually offer that as praise while I eat, wild-eyed, intermittently rubbing my hands together maniacally with apparent and embarrassing joy.

My use of the term does not translate well into print.

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I don't understand this use of brining. Why not just not overcook the bird? The French have been doiing it for centuries. I understand the generally low (to abysmal) quality of supermarket birds in the US (god knows I had to buy enough of them), but it seems unecessary to me. Why deal with all of that denaturation and extra saline - not to mention the effect on the sediment if you want to make a proper jus - if you don't have to?

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

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I don't understand this use of brining. Why not just not overcook the bird? The French have been doiing it for centuries. I understand the generally low (to abysmal) quality of supermarket birds in the US (god knows I had to buy enough of them), but it seems unecessary to me. Why deal with all of that denaturation and extra saline - not to mention the effect on the sediment if you want to make a proper jus - if you don't have to?

For me at least it's just a different way to cook the bird and I love the result. The bird comes out juicy and with a slighlty different texture. It's not necessarily better one way or the other just different. I sometimes like my coffee with milk and sometimes black....

Now, I have heard arguments from individuals who, like yourself, do not like the effects of brining and it's really a matter of taste, nothing more. As for salinity, a properly brined piece of meat should taste properly seasoned not oversalted or "cured".

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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The brine Keller uses also includes a healthy amount of garlic and seasonings, which add a lot more than just moisture and salt to the bird. I will admit that sometimes brining has undesireable consequences such as the occasionally rubbery skin, the added sodium, and the potentially oversalted pan sauce or gravy. But the flavor the brine brings to the roasted chicken is worth it. When it turns out just right the brined bird has crispier skin, moist flavorful meat with a slightly altered texture, and a deep mahogany color; all of which I like even though I also rarely bother to brine my chickens.

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For anybody in Southern California, Thomas Keller will be the keynote speaker at the Western Foodservice Expo on Sunday, August 21st at the LA Convention Center. After the session, he will be autographing copies of the French Laundry Cookbook and the Bouchon Cookbook. Click here for more info. The keynote speech starts at 11 am on Sunday.

Edited by Matsu (log)
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Last week I made the Foie Gras Terrine (pages 24 and 25) and the Smoked Salmon and Steamed Rillettes (page 26). Both turned out very well.

The foie was about 1.5 lbs and filled three 8-ounce mason jars with about 6 ounces in each.

The salmon also filled three 8-ounce mason jars. (Smoked the salmon myself.)

edit to add page numbers.

Edited by Really Nice! (log)

Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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It went according to the recipe. We were down there in late June this year and ordered it. Their texture was a little smoother, maybe I didn't work in the butter as well but flavor-wise it was great. I also added the optional chives to the mixture rather than waiting to add it later when serving. There might be some microbiological issues with that over time so I guess we'll have to eat them fast. :biggrin:

Oh, and when it says 'salt aggessively' they mean it. It's served cold and the taste buds can't detect salt as well on cold foods. It'll taste too fat or flabby without enough of it.

Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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For anybody in Southern California,  Thomas Keller will be the keynote speaker at the Western Foodservice Expo on Sunday, August 21st at the LA Convention Center.    After the session, he will be autographing copies of the French Laundry Cookbook and the Bouchon Cookbook.  Click here for more info.  The keynote speech starts at 11 am on Sunday.

This Board has started to look a little low on the praise so I will offer up that Thomas Keller is the best autographer in the business.

No joke.

Who else bothers with calligraphy when autographing books for a hundred or so fans?

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...Thomas Keller is the best autographer in the business.

Yup, even his autographs are all about finesse. :smile:

Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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It went according to the recipe. We were down there in late June this year and ordered it. Their texture was a little smoother, maybe I didn't work in the butter as well but flavor-wise it was great. I also added the optional chives to the mixture rather than waiting to add it later when serving. There might be some microbiological issues with that over time so I guess we'll have to eat them fast.  :biggrin:

Oh, and when it says 'salt aggessively' they mean it. It's served cold and the taste buds can't detect salt as well on cold foods. It'll taste too fat or flabby without enough of it.

Thanks, that is exactly the kind of info I was looking for!

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  • 2 months later...

I've made the salmon rillettes numerous times now, they are excellent! and the perfect thing to bring to parties! I like them best made a few days inadvace, it gives the flavors more time to meld

gallery_16100_231_612296.jpg

Last night we made the trout with haricot verts, almonds and brown butter. Excellent, quick and easy

gallery_16100_231_32163.jpg

Edited by little ms foodie (log)
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  • 3 weeks later...
Made Creme Caramel tonight.  Although oven floor has not recovered from the spill yesterday, but hell, I put a foil over the spill and hopefully everything will turn to ash in a few days.  I had a lot more success with this than with the quiche.  One step that made me really uncomfortable was putting plastic wraps in a hot oven...somehow that was a bit too adventurous for me.  Otherwise, the steps are surprisingly simple and while my custard did not look as pretty as the one in the book, it's still pretty damn good. 

Hey.. looks pretty good to me, so what happens to plastic wraps when you stick them in a hot oven?

I've just made the creme caramel and the plastic melted! I have no idea if the plastic melted into the custard or if it just retracted to the sides of the ramekins/baking dish. It looks okay. I don't think I see any plastic in the custards, but I won't know until I taste it tomorrow. Do you think it's safe? :huh:

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So there are no traces of the plastic wrap left at all? I'm not sure I understood the description. I might be inclined to take a little nibble to see if I could taste the plastic... have you tried it yet?

Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

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  • 1 month later...

I am going to tackle the Boeuf Bourguignon recipe and I have a question.

Could I do the red-wine reduction one evening and then cooking the meat the following day? I was thinking in reducing the wine to a glaze as the recipe calls, let it cool, and place the pot in the fridge until the following day.

Any comments will be appreciated it.

Thanks

Alex

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I am going to tackle the Boeuf Bourguignon recipe and I have a question.

Could I do the red-wine reduction one evening and then cooking the meat the following day? I was thinking in reducing the wine to a glaze as the recipe calls, let it cool, and place the pot in the fridge until the following day.

Any comments will be appreciated it.

Thanks

Alex

There is absolutly no reason why you shouldn't do that. the recipe is long and dividing it into steps is the best way to tackle it. Go for it and report back.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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  • 2 months later...

OK so I tried something that is probably beyond my skill level - the Pig's Trotters - and the roll is now resting in the 'fridge so I don't know how successful I was BUT, I now have this lovely pan of gelatinous tasty stock from the initial cooking of the hocks. What should I do with it? Soup comes immediately to mind, of course, but when I think of ham/pork stock I think of dried peas/beans/lentils and all of these things are considered quite nasty in this house. :shock: So, does anyone have any other ideas of how not to waste this wondrous stuff?

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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OK so I tried something that is probably beyond my skill level - the Pig's Trotters - and the roll is now resting in the 'fridge so I don't know how successful I was BUT, I now have this lovely pan of gelatinous tasty stock from the initial cooking of the hocks.  What should I do with it?  Soup comes immediately to mind, of course, but when I think of ham/pork stock I think of dried peas/beans/lentils and all of these things are considered quite nasty in this house.  :shock: So, does anyone have any other ideas of how not to waste this wondrous stuff?

Homer: hmmmmm....pork trotters

haven't made those amazing things in a while. The first thing that comes to mind, after degreasing the stock- is any kind of thick soup, maybe thickened with crusty bread. Alternatively why not cook some greens in it and serve them with a roast or fried chicken.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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