Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

"The Bread Baker's Apprentice" by Reinhart


Marcia
 Share

Recommended Posts

Practice. :rolleyes::biggrin: Seriously, the steam maker I got, has made a tremendous difference for me. I would never consider throwing water on my oven floors or walls, and a steam pan never worked for me. I wouldn't have even considered hearth baked type breads without it. Now, I just need to work on shaping etc. All this bread baking does leave me thinking up dishes that go well with fresh bread. Pasta, soup etc.....less beef. Is that a good thing? :blink:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So what is the best way to store baquettes so that the crust stays crisp, but the bread doesn't go rock hard?

My experience is that baguettes are a one-day wonder! Enjoy them fresh on the day they are made and turn them into crostini/garlic bread thereafter. Nothing I have tried maintains the crust AND keeps the dough soft. You can try freezing one, after it is completely cool, but the thawed bread doesn't measure up to the fresh in my judgement.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sigh...I read with envy your baguettes-baking...my oven's too small to bake them.

I finally got BBA and made Peter Reinhart's Multigrain Extraordinaire a couple of days ago. Though my family has been orientated to eat european-style breads from my almost 3 years of breadbaking, being Malaysians, their preference are still 'soft' breads, and this certainly got their thumbs-up. The flavour is also great. They are demanding that I make it again. Soon.

gallery_12248_5586_56036.jpg

Edit: I reduced the yeast from 1 tablespoon to 1 tsp, and the sugar from 3 T to 2, as I notice there is honey too.

Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anna, I was afraid you were going to say that. That's been my experience too so far. It's sort of a shame because I get three baquettes out of the BBA recipe and while we'll eat one with dinner, I've been making an awful lot of crostini and croutons. :biggrin:

Teepee, that multigrain looks fabulous. I may just have to try that one!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, do try it, Marlene. I used quinoa, rolled oats and wheatgerm (out of bran) for the soaker and black hill rice for the main dough. The bread is incredibly soft and fluffy, yet has a nice chew to it.

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today I tried the Pugliese bread from BBA. It's a fairly labour intensive bread, and I wasn't thrilled with the results. I did not get the big airy crumb the picture shows.

gallery_6080_205_23616.jpg

gallery_6080_205_136727.jpg

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So what is the best way to store baquettes so that the crust stays crisp, but the bread doesn't go rock hard?

Try cooking them 3/4 of the way..then cool and wrap and freeze. I do that with fougasse. When I'm ready for them I bake from frozen. Works well. I don't know why it wouldn't work with baguettes. Maybe you could experiment with one baguette and let us know what happens! :biggrin: Have you tried Vienna bread yet? I really like it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today I tried the Pugliese bread from BBA.  It's a fairly labour intensive bread, and I wasn't thrilled with the results.  I did not get the big airy crumb the picture shows.

I'm sorry you weren't pleased with the Pugliese. It's one of my favorites in the BBA. FWIW, my crumb never gets as airy as the photo either. The Pane Siciliano is another favorite.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today I made the Vienna bread. Now, this happens to be the best tasting bread I've ever made, but I think something's not quite right. In the book, the pic shows a tighter crumb than this. I seem to have gotten more of a french bread type of crumb. It was fabulous mind you. I made it without the dutch crunch topping as I didn't have any rice flour on hand. I got great oven spring and a nice bloom on this one.

gallery_6080_205_173644.jpg

gallery_6080_205_162135.jpg

gallery_6080_205_9765.jpg

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Kerry and Cali! I was really really happy with this one.

Cali, I don't have it yet, but I think now that I'm getting comfortable with breads, I will get it. I'm also signed up for a week long breadmaking course at ICE in NY at the end of March.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sticky buns from BBA. Does it count that it took me three tries to get it right? :rolleyes:

These are just out of the oven and flipped, so that glaze will harden up a bit more yet. I'd skip the raisins next time and just use straight pecan pieces for the topping.

gallery_6080_205_122782.jpg

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anna, I was afraid you were going to say that.  That's been my experience too so far.  It's sort of a shame because I get three baquettes out of the BBA recipe and while we'll eat one with dinner, I've been making an awful lot of crostini and croutons. :biggrin:

On of my favourite bakeries takes their leftover baguettes, slices them up, spreads some caramel (at least I think they use caramel) on each slice, then bakes them. Mmmmmmmm....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cinnamon Raisin Walnut Bread

I made this for the first time and need help.

I adhered to the recipe with one exception. I have a foodie friend I wanted to share with who thinks raisins overpower everything, so I used currants.

Other than that, no deviations from the recipe.

My problems..

The bread was dry. It didn't rise as it should.

I've gone over what might have affected the quality .

Yeast was good and fresh.

Oven temp was on the money.

Temp in the rising bowl area was about 78-82 degrees.

The recipe said 1 1/2 cups of raisins, rinsed and drained.

To me, rinsed and drained means measure , THEN plump the babies a bit.

I think plumped raisins would hold a lot more moisture than plumped currants.

Looking at the volume of plumped currants seemed to confirm this. Smaller.

Was this my boo-boo?

I took his recipe to mean 1 1/2 cups BEFORE rinsing. It wuz bigger afterwards. Lots bigger,as expected. Did I measure the difference? No. Although the currants got fat, raisins would have added a lot more moisture.

I added the walnuts and currants at the end of the Kitchenaid dough hook kneading.

2 minutes (per instructions) then took it out and finished kneading by hand.

It was a bitch to knead with so little dough compared to the add-ins.

First rising. It didn't double as it should. Second rising in pan.. It took longer, to the point I put it in the oven before it over-proofed and it deflated and did a pancake on me.

It was about 3/4 an inch over the top of the loaf pan when I put it in the oven. The finished product did an 'amourous man hit with a cold shower" and was about 1/4 to 1/2 inch below the top of the pans.

It was dense, like halfway between bread and fruit cake. Dense works if it's tasty, but I don't think that's the desired end result. But the dryness is totally not acceptable.

Good parts. Flavor was good. "Specially with good butter. Toasted must be wonderful.

This is a keeper and I want it right.

Oh yeah, supermarket bagged walnuts. I did not toast them a bit first. Should I have?

I've got that Pane Siciliano down. Damn, that's wonderful.

Now I've gotta fix this bread.

I'm a bit anal about his book. I won't be trying his next recipe till the previous ones come out tight.

All you pros, help me please?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I wanted to post my picture of the pugliese I made yesterday. I used half fancy durum flour to half bread flour. I did use the mashed potatoes as well. I was very happy with the way this bread turned out. I didn't have as many holes as the picture in the book but it is a start... I have been trying really hard not to deflate the dough much while shaping it.

gallery_32986_4430_888819.jpg

I also thought you all might like to read my account of the bread class I took with Reinhart in Dallas. It was very helpful. He is wonderful.

http://porterhouse.typepad.com/porter_hous...s-texas--d.html

-Becca

www.porterhouse.typepad.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Rushina
      What would you like to be included in a cookbook you classify as a "good cookbook"?
      Rushina
    • By Multiwagon
      Other than the three written by Michael Ruhlman, which I have read and loved, what other books are out there that are about cooking, but not cookbooks?
    • By jimb0
      i had a whole post typed up, but alas, it's been lost.
       
      i searched the forums but didn't find a thread dedicated to fried breads, thus.
       
      yesterday, i fried up some toutons to go with a beet soup. toutons are the popular newfoundland version of fried bread, historically made with bits of dough left overnight and fried in the morning with salt pork fat. like in the south, they were/are often served with molasses, butter, and/or beans. on the rock you'll find any number of restaurants serving them, some of which have a whole touton menu with various toppings or spreads. a lot of restaurants deep fry them instead of pan fry them out of ease of cookery, which has become a point of contention among many newfoundlanders.
       
      i had a bowl of leftover dough in the fridge from making khachapuris a couple of days ago, so i portioned out a couple of balls, patted them flat, let them proof for twenty minutes or so, and then pan-fried them in a mix of rice bran oil and butter. 
       
      fried breads have a long history all over, often but not always as a sustenance food for cold weather climes. the navajo are known for their version of frybread from the 1800s, but it's commonly believed that first nations groups of north america also had their own forms of bannock made with local ingredients before it was re-imported from scotland.
       
      anyway i'd like to investigate fried breads more; post your own favourites and experiments here.
    • By OliverB
      I just received a copy of "The Cook's Book - Concise Edition" edited by Jill Norman, and now I'm curious, what's the difference to the full edition? Supposedly it has 648 pages compared to 496 in this edition, and it appears to be much larger in size if the info on us.dk.com is correct. Other than that I can't find any info what the difference might be. It's a neat book with lots of photos about techniques etc, and lots of recipes. As with any DK book production values are high.
      If the contents are the same, I'm happy with the smaller version, but I'd really like to know what I might be missing on those 150 or so pages. If it's just filler, I don't care. If it's some fantastic recipes, I do care....
      Anybody here know both editions? Google was so far of no help. Lots of the full edition are to be had used as well, I'd be happy giving this one as a gift and ordering the full edition, if it's worth it.
      Thanks!
      Oliver
    • By devlin
      Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...