Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

"The Bread Baker's Apprentice" by Reinhart


Marcia
 Share

Recommended Posts

My pans are non stick.  Should I still use some cornmeal or anything?

I'll give this a go.  Why not?  A couple of months ago, I'd never made bread in life :biggrin:

I usually just put em in the pans right after shaping them, the little bit of bench flour seems to suffice assuming there is not gobs and gobs of it. FYI depending on your oven these may be done sooner than you think, mine get rotated 180 in the oven after 10 minutes and are done in 18-20 minutes total baking time.

Edited by 6ppc (log)

Jon

--formerly known as 6ppc--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been too intimidated to try anything but the white bread variations. I made these wonderful rolls from the second variation and they disappeared in minutes!

rolls1.jpg

I also made the same variation in loaf form as well as the first variation in loaf form and they were inhaled as well! Great recipes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the BBA rolls recipe. I also use the second variation one and they are a huge hit when I make them.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had thought to try the french baguettes from this book tomorrow, but in reading over the recipe, I feel defeated before I even start! This spraying the oven walls with water doesn't sound like a fabulous idea to me.  Can I just heavily mist the bread with water?

Spraying the oven walls is not a problem and won't hurt the oven. Get a decent spray bottle and turn the little nozzle thingie to "stun," the smallest sort of jet spray you can get, and then just shoot one side of the wall with the spray fast and hard and close the door quickly. Steam a minute or so before you load the bread, and then another time just after.

With my electric oven, I just throw a quarter of a cup of very hot tap water on the floor of the oven rather than using a spray bottle.

Edited by devlin (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This spraying the oven walls with water doesn't sound like a fabulous idea to me.  Can I just heavily mist the bread with water?

I'm not a fan of spraying the oven walls with water, either. I've done it and always wondered if the spraying was really accomplishing anything in a hot oven. The water evaporates so fast, and there's not much steam. However, Devlin's suggestion about setting your spray bottle to Stun sounds like a good one.

Spraying your bread with water is NOT a good idea, or so I've been told by a professional baker who worked with Reinhart for a long time.

I like the old-fashioned method of pouring a cup of ice water (room temperature water and ice cubes) into a preheated pan on the floor of the oven. I picked up this method from Collective Works, the cookbook by the Cheese Board in Berkeley. There's a gradual release of steam, and my bread is nice and crusty. This is not Reinhart's technique, but it works for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What struck me what the potential for water to get on the oven door glass or the oven light and potentially have them shatter.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What struck me what the potential for water to get on the oven door glass or the oven light and potentially have them shatter.

I don't know if spraying could harm any oven glass.

When I use my ice water method I am very careful to avoid dripping water on the glass of the oven door. Sometimes I cover the oven door temporarily with a towel while I pour water into the pan. This is actually important to remember. Thanks for reminding me to mention it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reinhart mentions covering the door with a towel. He also mentions that he learned the hard way when he didn't cover the door. My main oven doesn't have a glass floor, so your method might work pretty well for me.

Edited by Marlene (log)

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I'm beginning to prep my oven to resemble a steam oven, I did a little surfing on the web.  Does anyone have any experience with the Steam breadmaker  or the Sharp Steam oven?

I haven't used either, but Rose Berenbaum has given the steam breakmaker a good review. Click here.

I've thought about trying to improvise a setup like the Steam breadmaker by using a baking stone or tiles, a 4" deep hotel pan cover with a couple of holes drilled in, and this portable steam cleaner. I saw this at Target and thought, hmmm, looks familiar, and only $39.99. It gets lousy reviews for steam cleaning, but would be perfect for a short blast of steam. I think. If I get around to trying this, I'll post my results.

Ilene

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well I've ordered one. This just didn't work for me. Not only could I not get my hand out of the way in time, resulting in a nice steam burn, but I did not get the nicy glossy finish, and my slashes didn't open up the way they should have. I'll try this again when I get the steam master and hopefully will have better results. :sad:

gallery_6080_205_36369.jpg

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well I've ordered one.  This just didn't work for me.  Not only could I not get my hand out of the way in time, resulting in a nice steam burn, but I did not get the nicy glossy finish, and my slashes didn't open up the way they should have.  I'll try this again when I get the steam master and hopefully will have better results. :sad:

Not bad for a first try. When you slash a baguette, try making cuts almost flat to the surface of the loaf (about a 30 degree angle to the surface of the loaf). These will open up more decoratively as you are used to seeing in a baguette.

But you didn't tell us: how did the loaf taste?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, it doesn't taste that bad! the crust is definitely crispy. I don't give up all that easily, so I'll be trying this again when my steam thingy arrives. :biggrin: In the meantime, I'll just make cinnamon bread from the book tomorrow. :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not only could I not get my hand out of the way in time, resulting in a nice steam burn

When I use my steaming method (ice water in a preheated pan on the floor of the oven), I pull the pan slightly out of the oven, and toss the cup of water into the pan (more tossing than pouring, actually). If your hand is too much above the water when you pour, then you do risk a steam burn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey everyone..I just got this book and am looking forward to trying these great recipes..does anyone know if there is much of a difference in non diastatic malt liquid or diastatic? I could only find the non diastatic and I'm wondering if it will work the same. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not only could I not get my hand out of the way in time, resulting in a nice steam burn

When I use my steaming method (ice water in a preheated pan on the floor of the oven), I pull the pan slightly out of the oven, and toss the cup of water into the pan (more tossing than pouring, actually). If your hand is too much above the water when you pour, then you do risk a steam burn.

I did that, or I thought I did. Actually, it was a couple of my knuckles that got the brunt of the steam. I was more worried about spilling on th oven glass door I guess, although I did cover it with a towel.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... With my electric oven, I just throw a quarter of a cup of very hot tap water on the floor of the oven rather than using a spray bottle.

Just a comment on this; I think you'll actually get more steam using ice cold water. The temp. wil fall a bit more in the oven that way I guess.

Another thing; I've been doing the same in my electric oven, throwing directly at the bottom. Yesterday, however, I discovered that the floor of my oven is now out of shape. I think it has something to do with heating the metal up to almost 500F, and then throwing water at it. Did anyone else experience this?

Edited by glennbech (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find that King Arthur Sir Lancelot High Gluten flour is terrific for bagels, the only problem is that I have to mail order it.

Speaking of bagels though, I can't get the seeds and onions to stick. I coat with them when the bagels are still wet from boiling. I've never seen a bagel recipe calling for using eggs which the only sure thing I can think of to make them stick.

More misserable bagel atempts here... They collapse during the boiling process! Im blaming the flour this time.

I also think I need an update on flour terminology. How can a "bread flour" for "pizzas and bread" only have a 10,7% protein content? This is what I got from my best stocked grocery store. Typo "0" flour I think.

I've also bough dried gluten powder. Can I apply some of this with luck??

You're using an Italian flour with fairly low protein content that is used to make Napoletana-style pizza. You should definitely look into a higher protein content flour.. King Arthur's bread flour is 12.7% protein.

I don't know if that's the only thing that will fix your bagels though. I first made the BBA bagels using KA All-Purpose flour (11.7%) and they deflated during boiling. Same thing happened when I used the KA bread flour. Another poster in another thread with bagel problems thinks it might be overproofing, but I don't know. Or maybe we're not making the dough stiff enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... With my electric oven, I just throw a quarter of a cup of very hot tap water on the floor of the oven rather than using a spray bottle.

Just a comment on this; I think you'll actually get more steam using ice cold water. The temp. wil fall a bit more in the oven that way I guess.

Another thing; I've been doing the same in my electric oven, throwing directly at the bottom. Yesterday, however, I discovered that the floor of my oven is now out of shape. I think it has something to do with heating the metal up to almost 500F, and then throwing water at it. Did anyone else experience this?

I'm not sure the steam from ice water is significant enough to offset the drop in oven temp (at least I've always rationalized it that way for myself).

And I suppose I should warn folks that the floor of their oven might bend a bit with the practice of throwing water on it. Keeping a sheet pan on the floor of the oven might be a better practice. If my oven were better or more expensive, I'd probably make a point of that. As it is, I may just be subconsciously hoping for a reason to persuade my husband we need a new one. :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And I suppose I should warn folks that the floor of their oven might bend a bit with the practice of throwing water on it.  Keeping a sheet pan on the floor of the oven might be a better practice. If my oven were better or more expensive, I'd probably make a point of that. As it is, I may just be subconsciously hoping for a reason to persuade my husband we need a new one.  :biggrin:

I also subscribe "just throw some water directly on the floor of the oven" school of thought. I use hot water. If I cared about the oven I'd use a sheet pan or giant cast iron skillet on the bottom rack.

Jon

--formerly known as 6ppc--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also subscribe  "just throw some water directly on the floor of the oven" school of thought. I use hot water. If I cared about the oven I'd use a sheet pan or giant cast iron skillet on the bottom rack.

I use an old broiler pan, the heavy enameled kind, and I preheat it before adding ice water to it. This pan can take rough treatment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used a cast iron pan. My ovens are pretty expensive, and new. :biggrin: I've got the Cinnamon Raisin bread sans walnuts cooling on racks at the moment. I did the cinnamon swirl as well and I coated the top in butter and cinnamon sugar.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Rushina
      What would you like to be included in a cookbook you classify as a "good cookbook"?
      Rushina
    • By Multiwagon
      Other than the three written by Michael Ruhlman, which I have read and loved, what other books are out there that are about cooking, but not cookbooks?
    • By jimb0
      i had a whole post typed up, but alas, it's been lost.
       
      i searched the forums but didn't find a thread dedicated to fried breads, thus.
       
      yesterday, i fried up some toutons to go with a beet soup. toutons are the popular newfoundland version of fried bread, historically made with bits of dough left overnight and fried in the morning with salt pork fat. like in the south, they were/are often served with molasses, butter, and/or beans. on the rock you'll find any number of restaurants serving them, some of which have a whole touton menu with various toppings or spreads. a lot of restaurants deep fry them instead of pan fry them out of ease of cookery, which has become a point of contention among many newfoundlanders.
       
      i had a bowl of leftover dough in the fridge from making khachapuris a couple of days ago, so i portioned out a couple of balls, patted them flat, let them proof for twenty minutes or so, and then pan-fried them in a mix of rice bran oil and butter. 
       
      fried breads have a long history all over, often but not always as a sustenance food for cold weather climes. the navajo are known for their version of frybread from the 1800s, but it's commonly believed that first nations groups of north america also had their own forms of bannock made with local ingredients before it was re-imported from scotland.
       
      anyway i'd like to investigate fried breads more; post your own favourites and experiments here.
    • By OliverB
      I just received a copy of "The Cook's Book - Concise Edition" edited by Jill Norman, and now I'm curious, what's the difference to the full edition? Supposedly it has 648 pages compared to 496 in this edition, and it appears to be much larger in size if the info on us.dk.com is correct. Other than that I can't find any info what the difference might be. It's a neat book with lots of photos about techniques etc, and lots of recipes. As with any DK book production values are high.
      If the contents are the same, I'm happy with the smaller version, but I'd really like to know what I might be missing on those 150 or so pages. If it's just filler, I don't care. If it's some fantastic recipes, I do care....
      Anybody here know both editions? Google was so far of no help. Lots of the full edition are to be had used as well, I'd be happy giving this one as a gift and ordering the full edition, if it's worth it.
      Thanks!
      Oliver
    • By devlin
      Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...