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Risotto


sadistick
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I have a couple of recipes which call for adding egg yolk at the end - what are peoples opinions on that?

I also have been known to poach an egg to serve on the smoked haddock risotto I mentioned above.

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I have a couple of recipes which call for adding egg yolk at the end - what are peoples opinions on that?

I also have been known to poach an egg to serve on the smoked haddock risotto I mentioned above.

I, too, have a couple of recipes that call for finishing with egg yolk. Both are for poultry stock based dishes and I see that they add richness but not much else. I can see the addition if your stock is not real strong or if butter or cheese are being rationed. Otherwise I don't get much out of this.

Tobin

It is all about respect; for the ingredient, for the process, for each other, for the profession.

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I would second the idea of the butter and stock right at the end. It really helps with texture -- I like my Risotto on the runny side.

FB

The only thing is, I never feel like my risottos, which taste very good, are quite creamy enough.  I don't know if I'm not adding enough liquid or if I've cooked it too fast - it's really very close to what I'd get in a restaurant, but one little thing seems to be slightly off.  Anybody else have/had that problem and hopefully have some pointers?

I always add a knob of butter and perhaps a little more stock into the risotto right after I take it off the heat... (per reading Marcella Hazan). When I was looking up the link to different risotto rices I came across this link--there's actually an Italian phrase for adding butter in at the end!

link

A Trio of Tips on Finishing Your Risotto

When the risotto seems done and ready to remove from the stove, add one last ladelful of broth. This gives the risotto something to "sip on" as it sits in the bowl for a minute or two before you eat, leaves it with a fine creamy texture, and keeps it from getting too dry.

In addition you may want to add a spoonful of butter at the last minute. This is known in Italian as the "mantecatura." As the butter melts it coats each grain of rice, yielding a richer, creamier risotto.

Finally, some folks recommend that you let the risotto rest for just a minute or two between its departure from the stove and the actual eating in order to let the flavors meld fully. But don't wait too long. This isn't a dish you can prepare in advance and then have sitting around. It's meant to be eaten right after it's cooked. Risotto rules the roost best when it's still steaming hot from the stove.

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Well, The egg idea just groses me out, but rationally speaking, it makes sense, its basically just adding richness, but not for my taste, in fact, you would have to let the risotto cool down a lot, too much i think, in order to be able to add the egg and not cook it!

I will almost always add butter, and as long as its not mushroom or artichoke risotto, i will add cheese as well...

I dont like a 'soupey' risotto, thats too much like poridge, so the stock at the end doesnt appeal to me.

-J

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Sounds good, how did it come out???

gallery_16100_1_60968.jpg

YUM!!

The butternut squash was a twice baked filling I had extra of and had put in the freezer. I actually found proscuitto so I slivered it up and fried it a bit first. Then I used up half an onion and half a large shallot. Plus of course the one big leek. Parm and Old Man with a pat of butter at the end. I used a bit of dry white at the beginning and then chicken stock.

It was the best one I've made to date. I love risotto!!!!

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Sounds good, how did it come out???

gallery_16100_1_60968.jpg

YUM!!

The butternut squash was a twice baked filling I had extra of and had put in the freezer. I actually found proscuitto so I slivered it up and fried it a bit first. Then I used up half an onion and half a large shallot. Plus of course the one big leek. Parm and Old Man with a pat of butter at the end. I used a bit of dry white at the beginning and then chicken stock.

It was the best one I've made to date. I love risotto!!!!

Wendy, this looks wonderful! I have a question though, what is "Old Man"? I am not familiar w/that expression.

Pam

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Wendy, this looks wonderful!  I have a question though, what is "Old Man"?  I am not familiar w/that expression.

Pam

Sorry about that Pam, Grand Old Man is a pecorino that has been aged more (I think that is why it gets a different name) it is really fantastic!

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LMF - THat risotto looks TASTEY!!!

I always deglaze with wine, after I have 'toasted' the rice...its not really toasting though, just till they start to get translucent....Glad it turned out so well...I must say, I have never put onions or leeks in mine, but I dont see why not since i use shallots and sometimes celery tops...

I must make a squash one soon...Oh, and another way I know youirs was great...You can identify each individual grain of rice, which is KEY with a good risotto!

Cheers,

-Justin

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  • 1 month later...

I have been making risotto for a decade at least and I have always used Arborio rice...some times even very very expensive Arborio. The truth is (in my opinion) the expensive ones hold their "crunchiness" a little longer but don't differ much in flavor. What do you think? Is Arborio the best rice for risotto? What do you use??? Don't say Uncle Ben's PLEASE!

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I have been making risotto for a decade at least and I have always used Arborio rice...some times even very very expensive Arborio. The truth is (in my opinion) the expensive ones hold their "crunchiness" a little longer but don't differ much in flavor. What do you think? Is Arborio the best rice for risotto? What do you use??? Don't say Uncle Ben's PLEASE!

I have also always thought that Carnaroli was the type of risotto grain to look for.

Although I have had good results with other types in the past.

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Long time ago, I used Piedmontese Arborio. Then I found Carnaroli. After trying Vialone Nano from the Veneto province, I think this is the best risotto rice I ever had.

But remembering the times many years ago when I travelled on my old BMW motorbike through the silver-shining rice fields of Vercelli and Novara, now I think I'm going to try Arborio again.

Fads are coming, are going, and coming back again.

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At a risotto-themed dinner party I threw a couple of years ago, a friend and I did a head to head comparison between Carnaroli and Vialone Nano, and the Nano came out slightly superior, and finished cooking much more quickly. The Carnaroli took a longer time to absorb the cooking liquid, and didn't form as creamy a consistency as the Nano.

Both were quite good.

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

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Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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I like Vialone Nano best if I'm making risotto in a pressure cooker--Arborio always turns out mushy for me, and Carnaroli's not much better. I like Carnaroli and Vialone Nano about equally if I'm doing it the hard way, though....

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For most preparations, I prefer Arborio over Carnaroli. I find the latter gives a less creamy result with the grains retaining more of their integrity. Some chefs prefer it for exactly that reason, as it is more suited to the restaurant technique of cooking the risotto most of the way, then cooling and finishing to order (sometimes by adding cream to fake the missing creamy starch :shock: ). Carnaroli holds up better in soups, though. Violone Nano is good for the looser/soupier Veneto-style risottos, especially those with shellfish, where less creaminess and more firmness don't seem out of place.

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I have used Vialone Nano and think it's great, so velvety.

But -don't be mad- I have also made excellent risotto (albeit a little different) using local South Carolina short grain rice. I am actually headed to S.C. on Friday and was just thinking about that rice...

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I've used both arborio and carnaroli, and have never noticed a flavor difference, texture is the key. Carnaroli grains are much bigger after being cooked than arborio, therefore leaving more of a bite but less creamy texture than arborio. I've never used the nano version.

"He could blanch anything in the fryolator and finish it in the microwave or under the salamander. Talented guy."

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"technically"  quality is supposed to go: carnoroli, arborio, nano.

Interesting. I've never seen it that way, with Vialone Nano supposedly last in quality. My impression has always been that Arborio and Vialone Nano were the traditional rices, and approximately equal in inherrent quality.

Arborio is a softer rice more appropriate for the creamy Lombardia/Emilia-Romagna/Piemonte style of risotto while Vialone Nano is a toothier rice best suited for the soupy Veneto/Fruili style. They are completely different, and neither one is entirely satisfactory when used in the other's style. It is worth noting that the creamy style is by far the most common in the US, with the "sull' onda" style being virtually unknown over here (it's actually the style I prefer for seafood risotto). It people have the perception that Arborio is "better" than Vialone Nano, that may be part of the reason: they're not using the Vialone Nano correctly.

Carnaroli is a hybrid of Vialone Nano and Japanese sushi rice. It was designed to be in the middle between Arborio and Vialone Nano: both creamy and al-dente at the same time. It's okay and easier to work with than Arborio. But if I am making a creamy risotto, I'd rather just use Arborio and pay attention.

I should point out that these three rices are not the only kids on the block. There are other varieties suitable for risotto, like Superfino Baldo.

--

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I'm glad to read about stylistic differences for each of the rices. I don't make enough risotto to explore the subtleties of the various types in depth, but this discussion has definitely contributed to my understanding of what I'm doing.

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You know what, there is such a slight difference between them its really a matter of what you can get, and what YOU prefer...there is no one or the other...

I always used to the Arborio was #1, then I tried carnaroli, and it is also very nice, a tiny bit of a longer grain...both great.

Made a wicked spinach risotto with carnaroli and it tasted great.

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