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Turmeric


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As a culinary item, I have mixed feelings. I like it in small doses, and do like it better in lightly sweet preparation like a protein drink/smoothie. Poor quality dried turmeric, used in excessive quantities, can make something taste like dirt. I do take turmeric as a daily supplement for inflammation, I know the research is a mixed bag on that but as far as my doctors are concerned, it certainly isn't harmful and I personally feel that it provides some small benefit.

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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11 hours ago, liuzhou said:

validity or otherwise of the health benifit claims surrounding turmeric.

 

Health benefit claims of any ingredients are very unlikely to have any meaningful validity as those reports never are based on solid scientific data which would hold true under clinical trial conditions.

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In the larger scheme of things, a balanced diet is probably better medicine than taking the large quantities of a single food source necessary for medicinal affect.    If your diet includes normal intake on a very regular basis, there may be some small benefit.    These thoughts are from my "mental notebook", totally my own take.

eGullet member #80.

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I like it just fine and can't understand why people wouldn't like it, aside from the staining risks. I like the fresh stuff added to smoothies or juiced with ginger (which is some powerful business). I think my favorite recipe that uses a goodly amount is Alison Roman's "The Stew" which is basically turmeric, coconut milk, greens, and chickpeas. I amp up the turmeric by using a combo of fresh and dried. 

 

1 hour ago, Honkman said:

 

Health benefit claims of any ingredients are very unlikely to have any meaningful validity as those reports never are based on solid scientific data which would hold true under clinical trial conditions.

 

There are oodles of clinical studies on curcumin, but these are almost always done with an extract that provides a standardized dosage that is much higher amount than one is likely to consume from food alone. 

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