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nightscotsman

Jean Philippe Maury Patisserie

127 posts in this topic

Hahahaaa, that litened up my night.

UniversalCutterExtractor.jpg

Neil, do you use these kind of molds, because I really like these kind and haven't found better ones.


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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I've seen some of those molds around the kitchen, but I've never seen them used. I don't think the chefs like them. For almost everything we use either Flexipan or metal ring molds. However, we have been using these new (custom made, I assume) molds that are more like forms for the JPM desserts. They are sort of like two sheetpan sized sheets of plexiglass with 2 or 2-1/2 inch round holes cut out, separated by removeable plastic pillars that keep them about two inches apart. The circlular holes line up so they can hold acetate strips rolled into tubes that actually form the molds. To unmold, you just pull off the top sheet of plexi and remove the individual cakes.

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Do you have any idea of how hard it is to ge DeMarle to do custom flexi-pan. I know they do it but im not sure to what degree. i.e. for small business, personal use, one time only.... or just large production-hotel.


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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Actually, I'm delighted to read that they don't use those molds much at your work Neil. I started a thread before on them.........they just take SO D___ long to use, I hardly ever use mine. They also break!!

I've seen what your talking about to hold the acetate strips.......I think in P A & D. I've been looking for something similar that I could use everytime I go into a home improvement store. Eventually I might ask our handiman to make some for me, it seems easy-ish! Besides I want to be able to serve items on my buffet in those too.

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Do you have any idea of how hard it is to ge DeMarle to do custom flexi-pan.  I know they do it but im not sure to what degree.  i.e. for small business, personal use, one time only.... or just large production-hotel.

I'm sure you're right, but the ones we use aren't from DeMarle. They're cast silicone made for us by Chef Rubber (which happens to be based here in Vegas). The molds never go in the oven.

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As a matter of fact, at the Bellagio we do have a whole bunch of those kinds of molds . . . we have a bunch in storage . . . but Ive never seen us use them . . . :)

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Wow what a waste of money to never use something. Thats corporate for ya I guess.

Sinclair, acetate is almost a whole nother skill. I say you should do and try everything that pops into your head for acetate. Get as many ideas from people here as possible. I have come up with some really cool tricks with acetate. It's super smooth surface is unbeatable for and desserts presentation. Chocolate casting for garnish using acetate has endless possibilties. Sometimes i play with strips just to get a new idea for a dessert, you never know whats going to pop into your head.

Also I would be very careful with whatever you "construct" from the hardware store. If i mod something together i usuallly coat it with something like polyurethan or silicone to give it a sealed finish so food doesn't have any reactions with certain kinds of metals or metal treatments. Also wood dowels should be sealed too like your rolling pins because after fair amount of usage they collect debris and even if you try to wash it out the wood soaks up water obviously which could cause more problems.


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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Sinclair, acetate is almost a whole nother skill.  I say you should do and try everything that pops into your head for acetate.  Get as many ideas from people here as possible.  I have come up with some really cool tricks with acetate.  It's super smooth surface is unbeatable for and desserts presentation.  Chocolate casting for garnish using acetate has endless possibilties.  Sometimes i play with strips just to get a new idea for a dessert, you never know whats going to pop into your head.

Any chance you could post an example, I'm not totally sure I follow you.

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Neil,

so awesome I cant explain. Can you find out where those new fangled molds (the plexi ones ) come from?


"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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Neil,

so awesome I cant explain. Can you find out where those new fangled molds (the plexi ones ) come from?

Thanks! :smile: I'm pretty sure those molds were made in-house by the Bellagio engineering staff. Very handy folks who have made us custom molds, cutters and tuile stencils in the past, as well as being on call to fix our equipment 24 hours a day.

:biggrin:

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I figured out today where I saw similar molds to those plexiglass ones....Martha Stewart uses something just like that to hold pastrys on the buffet. She sets cone shaped items in it-------------then you don't need the bottom plate to have cut out circles too.

You can buy plexiglass and they'll cut it for you at Home Depot.........maybe they will cut circles too....I think they do? You get plexiglass dowels, cut it to length and glue them between your two panels. Sound good?

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man, they give jobs to people just to make custom mold. I want that job. If i were to customize anything it will be out of my own pocket at my house. Ohwell a hobby is a hobby.

Whenever i get a camera I'll do a whole thread on acetate and molds, maybe, if i can get that sqaured away before summer. Mid-april will bring hell.


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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However, we have been using these new (custom made, I assume) molds that are more like forms for the JPM desserts. They are sort of like two sheetpan sized sheets of plexiglass with 2 or 2-1/2 inch round holes cut out, separated by removeable plastic pillars that keep them about two inches apart. The circlular holes line up so they can hold acetate strips rolled into tubes that actually form the molds. To unmold, you just pull off the top sheet of plexi and remove the individual cakes.

I think I have seen these molds in the PCB catalogue. If you follow this link http://www.pcb-creation.fr/2k3/catalogues/...accessories.pdf and scroll to page 122 you will see a few small pictures. In the one picture with the orange colored pastries you will see a small white pillar just by his left hand. It is a little hard to see, and in their 2005 catalgue the pix are a little bigger, but you can enlarge the PDF for more clarity. They now also have a plate that can be used to make little cone shapes, very cool. It must be new for 2005 as I don't see it in their on-line catalogue.


Lysbeth

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However, we have been using these new (custom made, I assume) molds that are more like forms for the JPM desserts. They are sort of like two sheetpan sized sheets of plexiglass with 2 or 2-1/2 inch round holes cut out, separated by removeable plastic pillars that keep them about two inches apart. The circlular holes line up so they can hold acetate strips rolled into tubes that actually form the molds. To unmold, you just pull off the top sheet of plexi and remove the individual cakes.

I think I have seen these molds in the PCB catalogue. If you follow this link http://www.pcb-creation.fr/2k3/catalogues/...accessories.pdf and scroll to page 122 you will see a few small pictures. In the one picture with the orange colored pastries you will see a small white pillar just by his left hand. It is a little hard to see, and in their 2005 catalgue the pix are a little bigger, but you can enlarge the PDF for more clarity. They now also have a plate that can be used to make little cone shapes, very cool. It must be new for 2005 as I don't see it in their on-line catalogue.

Yep, that seems very similar to what we have.

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I just got my Spring JB Prince catalog and it has a couple of pages with lots of photos of "universal modular molds" and "production modular molds". They look a lot like what is being talked about here. My pocket book is already whimpering. :laugh:


Fred Rowe

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all i need now is a $10,000 waterjet machine and a few sheets of plexiglass about 2 inches thick and im set.

I got the money for the plexi, but I think i might need a fund raiser for the water-jet.


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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I've been out of the art business for too long cause I can't recall the name of the mat cutter that professionals use (I never owned that one it cost too much. it's a wall mounted multi function piece of equipment). I'm pretty sure the home improvement stores all own the same cutter, but it's doubtful they bought all the attachments. Anyway, they have attachments for cutting out circles and ovals in mat boards, glass and plexiglass. So perhaps some phone calls to your local frame shop could yeild a source.

They like to cut one hole per item but doing multiple holes in one sheet of anything is very do-able....just takes more calulations.

I cut my own glass and cutting plexi can't be too far from that. I can't think of what they call that thing we used to use in math class to draw perfect circles..........is it a compus? Anyway they have those for cutting glasss so they probably have them for cutting plexi. A call to your local stain glass shop might he another avenue.

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Truly, truly spectacular patisserie! Absolutely gorgeous work. Makes me realize exactly how far I have to go to achieve that level (and makes me want to push myself harder) and that I am, truly, just beginning.

Now if I can just convince my husband to go to Vegas (he hates it). :hmmm:


"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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Here it is, in white, milk and dark - the now operational chocolate waterfall:

gallery_5180_630_35715.jpg

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What happens to the chocolate in the waterfall? Is the waterfall actually just a giant tempering machine? Can you use the chocolate? Do you change it?

What brand of chocolate is best for waterfalls?

By the way I love to play in waterfalls.

Homer Simpson says: "Mmmmmmmmmm.......waterfall......." :laugh::laugh::laugh:

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It's even better than I thought, beautiful. Thanks for posting the picture! I can't wait to see it in person.


Lysbeth

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Wow!

Is that chocolate recycled back through the waterfall? It seems like a pricy display to keep up, of course, not like you guys have a shortage of chocolate or anything.

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Is that *real* chocolate? How do you keep it fluid?

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