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sadistick

Ceviche/Saviche

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Hello all,

This would be my first post on this great forum, hopefully not my last. I have been reading lots here, and feel most fortunate for stumbling on a forum that shares one of my passions, GREAT food, and wine!!! That being said, I have tons and tons of recipes to share (All out of my head, so no exact measurements, i apologise) and I figured since I Have not seen any recipe for saviche, i would share a good one. Its a very easy meal to make, extremely healthy, and delicious!

There are 2 type of fish which I prefer to use when making saviche. The #1 choice is King Fish, which for me is hard to find, my second choice would be Fluke.

You can use red snapper as well, or anything not too flakey, which nice texture.

without further adieu, on to the recipe!

1, Clean the fish, and cut it in to small cubes (about the size of a sugar cube is preferential) I do this all about 40 minutes before I am about to serve the dish, as I like it FRESH! - - I then will take some kosher salt, and salt the fish, so that will remove some excess liquid, and help condense the flavour

2, Again, since my measurements are all by eye, and depending on the amount of fish, you will need equal parts of lemon/lime juice, enough to totally submerge the fish in once all other ingredients are incorporated.

3, Get some nice chili peppers, whatever you prefer, I have some nice mexican jump up chilli's that I like for this, take as much, or as little as you want, dice it fine, and let it 'sweat' in the lemon/lime juice, t his will help release oils, and permiate the juices.

4, Chop up some tomatoes, red/yellow peppers, whatever you have around, and put that to the side.

5, Fincely dice a red onion, or a sweet vadalia onion, and then what I do is i will put it in some HOT water, so it will partially cook it, and remove the harsh onion taste.

6, Get a big bunch of cilantro, and chop that finely.

7, Remove excess salt from the fish, rinse it if you like, then put ALL ingredients in to the lemon/lime/chili mixture...add salt and pepper to taste...

8, This should stand approx 20 minutes before eating, as the citris will partially cook the fish, and get all the flavous moving together...

9, Garnish with extra cilantro, and serve!

I hope i didnt miss anything, if anyone has any questions, please ask!

Cheers all!

-SS

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Welcome!

Lately, I'm really into seafood/shellfish ceviche. I really like using shrimp, lobster, and crab.

I find that starting with par-steamed shellfish works best. I'm not sure if par-steaming is a real word/term, but basically I steam the shellfish to where they are about half-done then I dump them in ice cold water before proceeding with what are pretty close to your instructions.

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There are 2 type of fish which I prefer to use when making saviche.  The #1 choice is King Fish, which for me is hard to find, my second choice would be Fluke.

I'm not sure what king fish is.

Other than that, YUM!


V

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Oh, yeah... and how do you serve it?

I like serving them over fried tortillas, but not necessarily as tostadas. I serve them with freshly fried tortilla wedges, lots of chunky guacamole (more of an avocado relish), and lots of good spicy Mexican hot sauce (buffalo, la tapatia, cholula, etc...).


Edited by fiftydollars (log)

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I love ceviche and have made it with halibut and shrimp. Not sure if Fluke is available on the west coast and I've never heard of King Fish either?

Is there a regional difference in the dish in it's spelling? seviche or ceviche?

When I've made it I've actually let it 'cook' a few hours, maybe this also is dependant on the fish?? not sure.

Last time I made one I did it with shrimp and pomegranates....gorgeous!!

Welcome SS and thanks for the info!

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Hey Guys and Gals, thanks for the replies, and the kind welcoming comments...

I like to serve my Saviche (my spelling is terrible, thank god for spell checker!) in a nice glass bowl, and sometimes some minced avocado makes it nice and creamy...just like you fifty!

I am not sure what the other names are for Kind Fish, I will have to inquire.

I dont know about letting it sit for hours, to each his/her own, I would think that may 'cook' the fish too much, but who knows...I have never tried it.

Shell fish saviche is lovely, I actually started getting in to Saviche when i was in the Bahamas about 6 years ago, and had Conque (SP?) saviche, which is THE original...I belive

:smile:

-SS

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Oh my. This does bring back memories. Thank you, sadistick, and a hearty welcome to the Society.

I love ceviche. Note the alternate spelling. The emphasis is on alternate. There are many out there but this is the one I see most often in Mexico.

Back to the memories . . . Years ago, I had a group of friends that would get together and go to various parts of the world for the purpose of pestering pointy nosed fishes. We had chartered a sumptuous fifty foot sportfisherman in Cozumel in May, the height of the marlin migration, and were ready to fish. But, wisely, prior to boarding the boat, we went to the local market and procured the wonderful little limes, peppers, onions, garlic, but not tomatoes because, weirdly, none of us liked tomatoes. We also got a big box of Saltines. This was prescient.

While trolling the edge of a reef, we got into a school of truly awesome dorado (dolphin fish, mahi-mahi). After whacking the first 20 pounder in the head, I mentioned to the deck hand, in my bad Spanish, that this one was destined for ceviche. I motioned to our supply of ceviche ingredients and headed for the galley. He intercepted me and made it clear that he was the ceviche "king." I demurred. About an hour or so later, he came up with a huge bowl of the most incredible ceviche that I have ever tasted.

Saltines. Don't forget the Saltines.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Hehe Fifi, thank you for the welcome, and your story was great!!!

I can only imagine how awesome TRUELY fresh ceviche would be!

Saltines?????!!!!! That just scares me!

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I definitely don't fear the saltines...

Truth be told, once in a while, when I want ceviche, but don't want to fuss... Well I probably shouldn't be admitting to this... My mother isn't reading is she?

...I've made ceviche with Trader Joe's pre-cooked shrimp and have eaten it over saltines with tabasco...

Ok, I said it. Don't tell mom.

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. . . . .

I can only imagine how awesome TRUELY fresh ceviche would be!

Saltines?????!!!!!  That just scares me!

Yeah, from swimming to mouth in less than two hours does make a difference. I truly feel blessed to have been able to experience it.

Do not be afraid of Saltines. They are traditional with seafood in the south. (Sometimes they are slathered with butter.) They are also common in Mexico with ceviche and other seafood cocktail type preparations.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I am not sure what the other names are for Kind Fish, I will have to inquire. 

I've seen kingfish identified as "hiramasa" in sushibars, but tried Google and came up with the species name Seriola lalandi lalandi on the NIWA website (it's quoted as a type of yellowtail).

Saltines (or whatever brand you get soda crackers under) is apparently the common thing to each ceviche with in Mexico, though the variants I've seen have had tomato (as in paste).

I've made ceviche with snapper, wild sockeye, shrimp (cooked), scallops, halibut and fluke. Blood oranges worked very well as the acid source for the salmon but it taints the color of the pale fishes.

You might be interested in a book called Ceviche! by Guillermo Pernot of Pasion in Philadelphia. Has some interesting ideas as to what you can do with this form, though many of his recipes can't be reproduced given availability of certain ingredients and a certain lack of handy tips in his prose.

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Kingfish in the Gulf of Mexico generally refers to the King Mackeral Scomberomorus cavalla. The flesh is typically rather strong and best kept for smoking. The upper muscle group is often harvested on catching to make "Kingfish Balls" that are fried. With the recent restrictions on the catch, I am not sure what the fishermen are doing with it.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Kingfish in the Gulf of Mexico generally refers to the King Mackeral Scomberomorus cavalla.

Interesting! I've had that as "sawara" but it's always been a tataki-style presentation. Can't see it as a traditional ceviche per se, but perhaps escabeche?

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Yes, the saltines are definitely a popular way of eating ceviche in Mexico. They are also a popular accompaniment with Mexican shrimp cocktails and whatnot.

But my mother has distinct preference for freshly fried corn tortillas and to me it feels like that is the only proper way of eating it. Occasional indiscretions aside, it's definitely better than the saltines.

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Re saltines...ceviche/seviche is very popular in some parts of the world that don't have tortillas, and saltines are usually served. But I also really love it a la Mexicana....on tostadas, with extra lime and Tapatia or other hot sauce.

And the 'cooking.' Sometimes you can't eat it all at once, you know, so it sits for a while. When I lived in Panama, we'd buy it from the takeout counter of one of my favorite restaurants, "Las Americas." I'd buy it in those big glass gallon jars which would last us almost a week.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Kingfish in the Gulf of Mexico generally refers to the King Mackeral Scomberomorus cavalla. The flesh is typically rather strong and best kept for smoking. The upper muscle group is often harvested on catching to make "Kingfish Balls" that are fried. With the recent restrictions on the catch, I am not sure what the fishermen are doing with it.

I'm quite fond of grilled Kingfish. Being a member of the Mackeral family, it is strong tasting and oily. I guess it's a matter of preference. I also love Bluefish and many people don't.

Jim

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I've seen ceviche served with a small hunk of corn on the cob, onion salad and sweet potatoes on the side. This was a South American version though...

Soba

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I've seen ceviche served with a small hunk of corn on the cob, onion salad and sweet potatoes on the side.  This was a South American version though...

Soba

Ceviche is arguably the national dish of Peru. There are cevicherias all over the place. I brought back a bunch of Peruvian cooking books. I should start making some of these dishes. I think Peruvian cuisine is underrated.

My favorite ceviche in Lima may be the most common. It is composed of lenguado (flounder?), sliced red onion, chopped red and yellow aji limo chiles, key lime juice, a round of boiled corn, slices of sweet potato, and some lettuce.

There's also ceviche's newer cousin, tiradito. I'd describe it as ceviche with nikkei (local Japanese) influence. If you like the stuff in the Nobu cookbook you'll find lots of it in Peru.

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I brought back a bunch of Peruvian cooking books. I should start making some of these dishes. I think Peruvian cuisine is underrated.

Peruvian cuisine is only 'underrated' in the US. It is legendary throughout the rest of the Americas. Most other American countries have Peruvian restaurants, along with the usual suspects of Italian, French, Chinese, etc. When I lived in Panama, there were several Peruvian restaurants in Panama City alone, all doing a bustling business.

In the US, it's not so much that Peruvian cuisine is underrated as it is that it's completely unknown. Most US residents have no clue what lies below Mexico. They think that everyone south of us eats tortillas and enchiladas. When we lived in Panama, many of our houseguests would refer to the Panamians as Mexicans, and ask when we were going out for some good "Mexican food." There was one pretty mediocre Mexican restaurant there (as opposed to the several Peruvian ones) but, in Panama, Mexican food is a foreign cuisine requiring the use of imported foodstuffs. There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to think that Panama would have any better Mexican cuisine than any other country not even adjacent to it. Like England, say, or Canada, or whatever. I'm just using this example as an indicator of how little most norteamericanos know about the food south of us. Peruvian cuisine is sadly not even a blip on our culinary radar screen.

It's a damn shame to be so ignorant of our own hemisphere, but throughout the rest of it, Peru is known as the "France of the Americas" because of its sophisticated, complex, elegant, wonderful cuisine.

As you have apparently discovered.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I brought back a bunch of Peruvian cooking books. I should start making some of these dishes. I think Peruvian cuisine is underrated.

Peruvian cuisine is only 'underrated' in the US. It is legendary throughout the rest of the Americas. Most other American countries have Peruvian restaurants, along with the usual suspects of Italian, French, Chinese, etc. When I lived in Panama, there were several Peruvian restaurants in Panama City alone, all doing a bustling business.

In the US, it's not so much that Peruvian cuisine is underrated as it is that it's completely unknown. Most US residents have no clue what lies below Mexico. They think that everyone south of us eats tortillas and enchiladas. When we lived in Panama, many of our houseguests would refer to the Panamians as Mexicans, and ask when we were going out for some good "Mexican food." There was one pretty mediocre Mexican restaurant there (as opposed to the several Peruvian ones) but, in Panama, Mexican food is a foreign cuisine requiring the use of imported foodstuffs. There is absolutely no reason whatsoever to think that Panama would have any better Mexican cuisine than any other country not even adjacent to it. Like England, say, or Canada, or whatever. I'm just using this example as an indicator of how little most norteamericanos know about the food south of us. Peruvian cuisine is sadly not even a blip on our culinary radar screen.

It's a damn shame to be so ignorant of our own hemisphere, but throughout the rest of it, Peru is known as the "France of the Americas" because of its sophisticated, complex, elegant, wonderful cuisine.

As you have apparently discovered.

I agree 100-percent with you, Jaymes.

I've been lucky enough to have made several extended trips to South America, including to Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, and Uruguay. I am not sure that I even saw any Mexican restaurants even in a city like Buenos Aires which is larger than New York City. Well, I do remember seeing one in Santiago in the Providencia district where many U.S. workers live. Yet when I'm back in the States everyone will ask me about tacos, tortillas, and what the nachos are like! Peruvian restaurants and Peruvian dishes in other restaurants are quite common. Maybe a little less in Argentina and Uruguay because they are more euro-centric. Lots of pasta there due to the Italian immigration. It's really a shame Peruvian is not known at all here, like you said.


Edited by esvoboda (log)

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unfortunately, the only ceviche (how do you say it anyways? seh-vee-chay, im guessing) i had was bastardised at a chilis clone (on the boarder) in which it was with shrimp and was smothered in cocktail sauce. surprisingly, it wasnt half bad, but it sure as hell wasnt what your talking about. I hope we start getting some real ceviches in california soon.

I was actually thinking of making a fusion/bastardised/avant garde ( :raz: ) ceviche of my own with orange roughy in lime juice with pineapples, pearl onion, lentils, and basil over sweet cabbage.


Edited by PurpleDingo99 (log)

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unfortunately, the only ceviche (how do you say it anyways? seh-vee-chay, im guessing) i had was bastardised at a chilis clone (on the boarder) in which it was with shrimp and was smothered in cocktail sauce. surprisingly, it wasnt half bad, but it sure as hell wasnt what your talking about. I hope we start getting some real ceviches in california soon.

I was actually thinking of making a fusion/bastardised/avant garde (  :raz:  ) ceviche of my own with orange roughy in lime juice with pineapples, pearl onion, lentils, and basil over sweet cabbage.

I know Mexico has its own ceviche too but I haven't tried it. I think anything with fish and a citrus juice to "cook" it can be called a ceviche. I'd feel most comfortable sticking with sushi grade fish. There's plenty of room to experiment. Peruvian cuisine is a melting pot of native American, Spanish, African, Japanese and Chinese, among major influences. I pronounce the "v" in ceviche like a soft "b".

Here is a good link with a bunch of information about ceviche.

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I can't believe this is online. Here are some recipes from a great book I bought in Peru that covers Peruvian cuisine. I think you can get this book here too. There are ceviche and tiradito recipes among others.

The Art of Peruvian Cuisine

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that last link definitely has me intrigued. Finding those aji limos around here would be next to impossible and right down the street from 'dont hold your breath,' so what would be a proper substitute?


Edited by PurpleDingo99 (log)

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