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Gifted Gourmet

Hollywood goes gastronomic: Sandler or Bourdain?

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the article from the LA Times

(Adam Sandler) is a chef. Not just a chef, but the best chef in the country Thanks to a four-star review from that paper, John's Los Angeles eatery becomes incredibly hot and twice as lucrative ...

(Darren Star) describes his hero (Bourdain) as a guy who has been a comet in the food world, a substance abuser who lives life to the edge. "You have to balance the demands of the job with the big temptations that come with celebrity.

This interesting article goes on to discuss the new film "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou" ... and, of course, "Sideways", with which we are now quite familiar ...

but now I have to use this article as a mere jumping off point to ask some cinema-food questions of you fellow posters:

Question #1:

Do you particularly enjoy a film when it involves cuisine and its aspects/ramifications? :wink:

Question #2:

Your favorite food-themed film? :rolleyes: Recent? Past?


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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The fact that they are bringing up a TV series which might never get made and a film ("The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou") with a very, very tenuous food connection (I saw it last night, and I don't remember food being a big part of it at all) makes me think that - gasp! - this paper is making up with silly cultural "trends" that really don't have much grounding in reality. Shocking. Whatever next? :wink:


Edited by VeryApe77 (log)

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I would like to see a buddy film starring Bourdain and Ruhlman-based characters (or Bourdain and Ruhlman) wherein they would go around doing pretty much what Bourdain did in Cook's Tour, but with Ruhlman, lots of drinking, and lots of witty dialogue. As a running gag Bourdain would vomit a lot while, for some reason, Ruhlman wouldn't.

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I dunno. Somehow the idea of a Shampoo-like sitcom based on Tony just makes me feel a bit strange. Its doubly weirder when its someone you actually know, especially when they are someone that already has a signifcant presence in person. When you know the "real deal" in person, the idea seeing sombody "play" that person is somewhat Kafka-esque. But I'll reserve judgement until I see the thing.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I dunno. Somehow the idea of a Shampoo-like sitcom based on Tony just makes me feel a bit strange. Its doubly weirder when its someone you actually know, especially when they are someone that already has a signifcant presence in person. When you know the "real deal" in person, the idea seeing sombody "play" that person is somewhat Kafka-esque. But I'll reserve judgement until I see the thing.

Being a complete outsider in both the food and media worlds, I don't feel the need to reserve judgement, (aka, give it the benefit of the doubt).

It'll suck.

SB

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Edited: Deleted. Not worth the effort


Edited by chefzadi (log)

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I dunno. Somehow the idea of a Shampoo-like sitcom based on Tony just makes me feel a bit strange. Its doubly weirder when its someone you actually know, especially when they are someone that already has a signifcant presence in person. When you know the "real deal" in person, the idea seeing sombody "play" that person is somewhat Kafka-esque. But I'll reserve judgement until I see the thing.

Being a complete outsider in both the food and media worlds, I don't feel the need to reserve judgement, (aka, give it the benefit of the doubt).

It'll suck.

SB

If it ever gets onto our screens, then yes I'm pretty much certain that it'll suck. I might check it out, but I certainly won't expect it to have anything to do with the book (or, for that matter, the authour).

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The article touches on an interesting dynamic between LA and NY Times restaurant reviews. I agree that it’s a dis to the LAT that in Sandler’s movie the NYT reviews his LA restaurant. But I, for one, don’t read LAT restaurant reviews while I regularly read the NYT’s… and I don’t live near or regularly visit either place.

I can’t be the only one…

I do read the food section of the LA Times every Wednesday just like I read the NY Times’, Washington Post, SF Chronicle, Oakland Tribune(sucks), Modesto Bee(surprisingly good), etc... However, I only bother with the reviews in three papers, NYT, SFC and WP. I read the Post’s because of Sietsema and his weekly chats and the SFC because I am a local, but the NYT I read because NYC is the epicenter of the culinary universe and LA, is by comparison, just sad culinary backwater that no one outside of LA really cares to read about.

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The article touches on an interesting dynamic between LA and NY Times restaurant reviews. I agree that it’s a dis to the LAT that in Sandler’s movie the NYT reviews his LA restaurant. But I, for one, don’t read LAT restaurant reviews while I regularly read the NYT’s… and I don’t live near or regularly visit either place.

I can’t be the only one…

I do read the food section of the LA Times every Wednesday just like I read the NY Times’, Washington Post, SF Chronicle, Oakland Tribune(sucks), Modesto Bee(surprisingly good), etc... However, I only bother with the reviews in three papers, NYT, SFC and WP. I read the Post’s because of Sietsema and his weekly chats and the SFC because I am a local, but the NYT I read because NYC is the epicenter of the culinary universe and LA, is by comparison, just sad culinary backwater that no one outside of LA really cares to read about.

The celebrity machine and lust for media attention is alive and kicking in New York as well.

I'm always perplexed when I hear such extreme statements such as "NYC is the epicenter of the culinary universe." The universe is a REALLY big place. Perhaps it's more accurate to say that there is a consensus amongst a group of food writers who are mostly if not all Americans who have not traveled the entire universe that New York has the more to offer than other U.S. cities. (I know run on sentence. But English is far from my native language). Another extreme statement is that "LA is a sad culinary backwater compared to New York." Come on. I don't defend the culinary standards here but it's a pretty big city with some good things in terms of food to offer.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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And these little twits who just graduated from an expensive culinary school.... the dishwasher is OVER THERE! After that peel that sack of potatoes.

That's my rant for now.

I dont get it. If culinary students have to start at the dishwasher and begin by peeling potatoes, why are there culinary schools?

And why are you working as 'chef instructor' at an 'expensive culinary school'? Are you telling me *gasp* that your school and the likes of it are ripping off young impressionable minds? Pray do tell. Enquiring minds want to know.

re bourdain, I hope people dont look up to him as a 'hero' or a 'role model' and I am sure Mr.Bourdain will be the first to back me up here.

edited to add for GG:

answer #1: No.

answer #2: The cook, the thief, his wife and her lover.


Edited by FaustianBargain (log)

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EDITED: DELETED for the reason above


Edited by chefzadi (log)

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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And these little twits who just graduated from an expensive culinary school.... the dishwasher is OVER THERE! After that peel that sack of potatoes.

That's my rant for now.

I dont get it. If culinary students have to start at the dishwasher and begin by peeling potatoes, why are there culinary schools?

And why are you working as 'chef instructor' at an 'expensive culinary school'? Are you telling me *gasp* that your school and the likes of it are ripping off young impressionable minds? Pray do tell. Enquiring minds want to know.

re bourdain, I hope people dont look up to him as a 'hero' or a 'role model' and I am sure Mr.Bourdain will be the first to back me up here.

edited to add for GG:

answer #1: No.

answer #2: The cook, the thief, his wife and her lover.

So that they can begin to see what they got themselves into. :laugh: In my trade, Carpentry,after you school you enter the University of Hard Knocks where you grow up and become a professional. School only gives a foundation. What you do after that is what makes you. :raz:


Edited by winesonoma (log)

Bruce Frigard

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111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Cooking is a craft, you  study the masters and the techniques they used before you came along, then you practice, practice, practice. Being a chef means you are run a commercial kitchen. Being a good leader to me is knowing, understanding and having done what everyone else on the kitchen line has. The dishwasher, hey EVERYONE in my kitchen and restaurant needs to respect him. Any position on the line is hard, demanding work. You peel potatoes untill you can't stand to peel another one, but you keep going and you get to the point where it doesn't matter, you're a monk, you just keep going....

amen. the thing about media portrayals of the kitchen is that no one ever makes it clear that the work is really hard, and requires a tremendous amount of concntration, skill and, yes, often luck. i went to cooking school, i started at the bottom of the kitchen....sort of a modified prep/dishwasher/loading dock operator. it amazes me when kids from cooking school spend time in my kitchen whether as commis', externs or stages, and think they're gonna start out on the saute station, and it's gonna be like iron chef or monica's restaurant on "friends", and never even bother to learn the dishwasher's names. c'mon...currently i have grads from three different schools, all just starting out, in the kitchen...fortunately, they're not your typical college boys(girls), but i see it all the time, too.

and, quite frankly faust, if you read tony bourdain's description of a day in the life of a cook/chef, i think you might (if you were a kitchen person), kind of think of him as a role model, just in being able to describe and remember all the things he did in a day. despite his wild ass, party down rep, the man was a working kitchen drone for a very long time before he himself became a media darling.

to answer the original questions:

1. nope, they always make me crazy for lack of accuracy and continuity, and...

2. usually any gangster/chopsocky/spy movie with a chase through a busy hotel kitchen! :wink:

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Faust-

The way you pose your question gives me the impression that inflammatory minds want to know.

As I happen to have a certificate signed by Andre Cointreau, can you tell me which part of your reply is supposed to NOT inflame me? Especially considering that you are an instructor yourself.

There are plenty of interviews and articles with Chefs regarding their thoughts on culinary schools. You can google it in your spare time. I don't mind getting into all the details here with you. But your attitude really turns me off.

Naturally, I am CRUSHED that my attitude really turns you off. I simply CAN-NOT stop my lower lip from quivering with anguish. Oh! Hear my whimper!

Cooking is a craft, you  study the masters and the techniques they used before you came along, then you practice, practice, practice.

Which part of dishwashing = practice?

Being a chef means you are run a commercial kitchen. Being a good leader to me is knowing, understanding and having done what everyone else on the kitchen line has. The dishwasher, hey EVERYONE in my kitchen and restaurant needs to respect him.

What has this got to do with your previous comments?

Any position on the line is hard, demanding work.

Yes?

You peel potatoes untill you can't stand to peel another one, but you keep going and you get to the point where it doesn't matter, you're a monk, you just keep going....

Why?


Edited by FaustianBargain (log)

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and, quite frankly faust, if you read tony bourdain's description of a day in the life of a cook/chef, i think you might (if you were a kitchen person), kind of think of him as a role model, just in being able to describe and remember all the things he did in a day.  despite his wild ass, party down rep, the man was a working kitchen drone for a very long time before he himself became a media darling.

Hi pidge, I have to disagree. What if one havent ever been 'a wild ass' and didnt have a 'party down rep'? What if one is hardworking and sincere? No offence, but not a role model for all.

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In my trade, Carpentry,after you school you enter the University of Hard Knocks where you grow up and become a professional. School only gives a foundation. What you do after that is what makes you. :raz:

I do agree. However, all hard work should be relevant to the craft. Simply abusing one's endurance is not helping the industry become respectable. Fortunately, in the culinary industry, there are good, extremely talented chefs who have broken the chain of abuse.

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OK Kids.

This started off as an intersting thread and, minus the little dustup, it still can be. knock it off with the insults, quit making it all so personal, and get back to the original subject.

I could repost, for the millionth time, the section of the user agreement, but there is no point. You have all seen it plenty of times.

Read, Chew, Discuss, Behave

Thanks for your cooperation,

The Management


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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OK Kids.

This started off as an intersting thread and, minus the little dustup, it still can be. knock it off with the insults, quit making it all so personal, and get back to the original subject.

So, where were we? Oh now I remember:

Question #1:

Do you particularly enjoy a film when it involves cuisine and its aspects/ramifications?

Question #2:

Your favorite food-themed film? :rolleyes: Recent? Past?

Carry on ... enjoying the banter and persiflage ... :wink:


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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#1 Yes.

#2 The Big Night


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I don't recall seeing that many food-related flicks; big night and the cook, the thief etc. are both cool movies, but i've never seen a movie that conveyed what a busy saturday night on the broiler is like. something by michel gondry, or whats-his-name, trainspotting man. I've heard about a movie called god of cookery, by the same guy that did shaolin soccer; apparently it's an inter-kitchen war, with a climactic battle over one restaurant's recipes...that sounds cool :cool: ...either way the answer to question #1 is yes....though not always. i found "tortilla soup" to be a deadly bore.

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1. yes

2. Mostly Martha, but also most food scenes in a film...

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I've heard about a movie called god of cookery, by the same guy that did shaolin soccer;

Great suggestions, guys. I'm trotting over to my Netflix window to rent them.

2: not a 100% food-themed film, but I liked Bella Martha (a.k.a. Mostly Martha, see here) a lot.

"Martina Gedeck stars as Martha, whose obsession with precision gourmet cooking extends to discussing recipes with her bewildered therapist (August Zirner) and verbally attacking anyone at the restaurant who attempts to send her food back. " :laugh::laugh::laugh:


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1. yes

2. the food-related film i saw so far is Chocolat(would that count). A lot of people are saying that babette's feast is a good food-related movie. Has anyone seen that movie?

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