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What shoudln't I miss around Breaux Bridge area?


bakezoid
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Having had NO recomendations for eats in & around New Orleans in December (and I did very well myself, thank you!) I am offering a chance for this board's redemption as a food resource.

Planning 5 days in "Cajun Country" mid-February with eating & drinking a major focus (also music and warm weather). So now's your chance to send me in the right direction. Any price range, high or low, so long as it tastes good; & this is my first time to this part of Louisiana.

Hope you guys come through for me! PLEASE......

Amy

If more of us valued food & cheer & song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. - J.R.R. Tolkien
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Lots of good recommendations in this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=40644

and specializing in gumbo at this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=45484

Scorpio

You'll be surprised to find out that Congress is empowered to forcibly sublet your apartment for the summer.

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Here are a few more threads that will help you out, and I will be putting together a list (for another purpose, but you will certainly benefit) this week of places of interest. I will also reccomend, insist really, that you buy a copy of my friends Macon and Julie's fabulous book, Cajun Country Guide. If it's in there, you can trust the recs. Even if I had not known Macon for twenty years, I would still stand on a stump and scream to the masses about this useful guide to one of the most interesting and beguiling parts of the United States.

Avery island

New Iberia

Cajun Country Thread

Good Gumbo-some of it in Acadiana

Boudin

There are lots more, if you dig around. But this should get your tastebuds going.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Here are a few more threads that will help you out, and I will be putting together a list (for another purpose, but you will certainly benefit) this week of places of interest. I will also reccomend, insist really, that you buy a copy of my friends Macon and Julie's fabulous book, Cajun Country Guide. If it's in there, you can trust the recs. Even if I had not known Macon for twenty years, I would still stand on a stump and scream to the masses about this useful guide to one of the most interesting and beguiling parts of the United States.

Avery island

New Iberia

Cajun Country Thread

Good Gumbo-some of it in Acadiana

Boudin

There are lots more, if you dig around. But this should get your tastebuds going.

If more of us valued food & cheer & song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. - J.R.R. Tolkien
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Hope you enjoy Cajun Country! While I have been away from my hometown of Lafayette for 10+ years now, and I haven't read through the suggested threads, I would throw out Cafe des Amis and Mulate's. My feeling is that Mulate's has gone a little commercial over time, but I have an affinity for it as it was where my parents met some 40 years ago. Pretty good dancing there.

In Lafayette, I like Cafe Vermilionville for a nice dinner or lunch, and Old Tyme Grocery for killer poboys (my faves are fried shrimp, pastrami, and roast beef). Knock this back with a bottle of IBC root beer and a bag of Zapp's potato chips.

There are lots of new restaurants that have crept up in my absence that serve non-Louisiana fare (Thai, Mediterranean, etc.), but the ones I've listed are all places (other than the kitchens of family and friends) I like to visit on my trips home.

Have fun!

Bridget Avila

My Blog

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Thanks to all so far for the advice and the links to threads.

I've been munching on the Cajun Country Guide for several months and the only prpoblem with it is that I won't have enough time to go to everything that sounds good. It is probably the best guide book that I've ever seen for anywhere (and my guidebook collection is starting to gain on my cookbook collection). Would the authors consdier doing any other areas?

I've got about a month until I go which gives me lots of time to keep reading, including Trillin's Tummy Trilogy, and all of the threads and links from you guys. So keep posting. :biggrin:

If more of us valued food & cheer & song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. - J.R.R. Tolkien
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Bavila,

Why would you throw out Des Ami? Bad experience? I've never had one, and I'm kind of wondering.

Excuse me for my unclear message. By "throw out" I meant that I was presenting a suggestion. I DO recommend Cafe des Amis. Sorry!

Bridget Avila

My Blog

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And I really do suggest Abbeville - 20 miles south of Lafayette on US 167. Three world class oyster bars right near the Vermilion River and the big Catholic church. Shucks, Black's, and Dupuy's. Pick one. Can't miss. Dupuy's is the more "local" place.

Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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Must do boiled crawfish this time of year. There are places in Abbeville (I am only familiar with Richard's on South Henry), but others around here can make other recommendations. Gator Cove in Lafayette?

Scorpio

You'll be surprised to find out that Congress is empowered to forcibly sublet your apartment for the summer.

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Having had NO recomendations for eats in & around New Orleans in December (and I did very well myself, thank you!) I am offering a chance for this board's redemption as a food resource.

Amy,

Great question. Sorry about your lack of response, but this board doesn't get a whole lot of of local traffic. There are several other places that are heavily traveled.

That being said, I have an article on my website that I wrote a while back, titled "Where to eat in Lafayette" It should give you some good ideas. I'll chime in later on Abbeville - there are some great oyster places there. For posterity, I'll post the article below.

Kevin

www.nolafoodie.com

Where to eat in Lafayette

I lived in Lafayette for about six years and probably exhausted the supply of good restaurants, hence my return to New Orleans. Lafayette lunch is a lot different than New Orleans. Lafayette is big on the “plate lunch” mentality, which I thoroughly enjoy, and most of the best lunch spots are local. For dinner, there are several nice local restaurants; however, Lafayette has been inundated by chain restaurants. That being said, I ate at Chili’s about once a week when I lived there – it’s just too easy. Here are some GOOD recommendations:

Café Vermillionville is located on Pinhook. Fantastic for lunch or dinner and has a great selection of Creole and Cajun food. It is more of an upscale, “white tablecloth” type of place, but it is worth the money.

Blue Dog Café is average. I find that a lot of the food is heavy and over seasoned for an “attempted” Cajun cuisine. It is also located on Pinhook, almost directly across from Café Vermillionville.

On Ambassador Caffery Parkway, Charley G’s is always a safe bet for an upscale lunch or dinner. The bar is a quiet setting for a cold beer or a Bloody Mary, and the food has always been good. Now that the Metairie location is closed, I have a feeling they are giving all of the attention to the Lafayette location. Hard for me to say though, I haven’t been in a while – but I’ve always had fond memories of the crab cakes and my favorite- the duck and andouille gumbo

If you can make it a few miles north on I-49, I think Prejean’s has some of the best Cajun food in the world. Get a seafood platter and sample it all. It comes fried, but they will be happy to grill it for you. The shrimp dinner is to die for – fried shrimp, grilled shrimp, stuffed shrimp, shrimp gumbo… you know the drill. It’s worth the short 15 minute drive. You’ll likely be taking leftovers with you.

If you want some mediocre San Antonio style Tex-Mex I suggest you visit La Fonda, on Johnston St. The place is an institution and the “place to be” for lunch on Friday afternoons. Locals have been known to start there at lunch and sip on margaritas all the way through happy hour and dinner (yes, I’ve done it many times). Be careful though, the margaritas are small, but the most potent I’ve ever had. It’s still a mystery as to what goes into them. Try the fried rabbit for an appetizer, and the cheese enchiladas and guacamole are some of the best I’ve had. If you are in the mood for a real treat, ask for the “Don Briggs Special.” It isn’t on the menu, so you have to be “in the know.” It is a filet mignon topped with sautéed onions and cheese - I suggest getting the cheese enchilada as your side dish. Wash it down with some margaritas; just make sure you have a place to take a nap afterward.

Almost next door on Johnston Street is Pete’s sports bar – another Lafayette tradition. The hamburgers are fantastic, but no trip to Pete’s is complete without the homemade onion rings and homemade chips (yes, they slice the potatoes and make chips – fresh and hot). The beer is cold and the atmosphere is relaxed, but hey – it’s a sports bar! This is a great place for lunch or casual dinner.

Another Lafayette institution is Judice Inn on Johnston St. Their hamburgers are out of this world and priced just right. You can probably eat two if you have a healthy appetite. Don’t expect French fries though – they’ve never had them and probably never will – have a bag of Zapp’s chips instead.

A great lunch spot on the corner of Pinhook and Kaliste Saloom is Edie's. They are well known for their affordable lunches, fried chicken and best of all - the biscuits. I have to say, they are some of the best I have ever had. For office workers, a typical box of donuts on a Friday morning would be replaced by a box of biscuits from Edie's. Another thing they are well known for is their waitstaff, comprised entirely of good looking sorority girls from UL. An attorney friend of mine likes to call it "The Cajun Hooters," but I'll let you judge for yourself.

Downtown are some great places for lunch. I always suggest T-Coon’s, especially on the days they serve the rabbit. Always a good selection for lunch and the service is usually fantastic. You get your food cafeteria style, so you get to pick from the selections of the day. To boot, the service is always smiling and perky (and attractive).

Last but not least is Dwyer’s Cafe on Jefferson Street downtown. They have the most unbelievable plate lunches and a fantastic breakfast. I don’t even need to make a recommendation, just eat whatever they are serving; it will be good and hearty.

Hope this helps,

Kevin

Edited by UptownKevin (log)
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Take a look at Mary Tutweiler's article, Boudin and Beyond, published in the Times-Picayune sometime ago, luckily it was recognized by the Associated Food Journalists Association and is available on their website at http://www.afjonline.com/a4f1m.pdf Also, www.boudinlink.com, Dr. C's and Coach T's website chronicling their adventures with rice and pork in South Louisiana is a great source of info for good boudin. I especially like it as they have photos of every local which helps alot to find some of these places. Enjoy your trip. ch

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  • 1 month later...

Back from my long weekend in Acadia and want to give my thanks to you eGulleters who helped with my food selection.

And please pass my thanks on to the authors of Cajun Country Guide which became my portable Bible.

Here's how I did:

Friday - lunch at B&C Seafood deli in Vacherie; good seafood gumbo, andouille and duck gumbo and my husband and I shared a platter of assorted fried things including fried boudin balls. Excellent.

Dinner at Paul's Pirougue in Carencro. I ordered crawfish bisque but apparently my western NY accent was not understood ; I ended up with a bowl of crab and corn bisque that was so good that I didn't want to leave.

Saturday : Zydeco breakfast at Cafe des Amis. Food was not memorable (that means I don't remember what I ate :wacko:) , but the music was tons of fun. After a swamp tour we stopped at Bayou Boudin and Cracklin for some cracklins (our first time) to tide us over until we reached Mama's Fried Chicken in Eunice. My husband had some great chicken and I had great crawfish etouffe. And that tided us over until the 900th perfoemance celebration (read free) dinner of jambalaya and white bread and cake at the Liberty Theater. What fun to happen on a party :laugh:

Sunday night's dinner was at Prejeans'; my husband had an eggplant thing with a great sauce so I bought their cookbook. Don't remember what else excpet that it was real good and the Grambling baseball team was eating there and they took in lots more food than we did.

On Monday we headed back to New Orleans for the night and stopped for lunch in Morgan City at Ruby Mae's where I had a phenomenal Oyster Po' Boy and my husband had the best pork chop of his life, smothered and with red beans and rice.

What a great weekend of food and also warmth and sunshone for us Northerners who appreciate such pleasures.

Amy

If more of us valued food & cheer & song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. - J.R.R. Tolkien
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