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Chuck Steaks and Roasts


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I don't buy much meat at Safeway (select grade for more and don't get me started about that rancher's reserve BS). I much prefer Costco, where the meat is choice, the prices are great, and the steaks are thick. The trouble with Costco is they don't sell every cut, and it's not just low service, it's no service.

So I was in Safeway checking out the meat department and a top blade roast caught my eye. Having heard much about this cut for so long (and of course, the flatiron steak made from it) I thought I would give it a try. So I took it home, cut out its dark gristly heart (the line of connective tissue down the center of it) tied it back up, seasoned with garlic salt and pepper, then seared it in a dutch oven for about ten minutes. Then, I stuck a thermometer in it and popped it in a 350 degree oven to finish. It was the bomb . . . . like tenderloin but with flavor. Rich gravy. Just outstanding - for $2.99 a pound. This has led me to wonder if I've been missing out. What other gems lie in the Chuck? Burgers? Sure - I know about them, but what about steaks and roasts? What do you like?

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Great thread idea. I'm very interested in info along these lines as well. I often see some big slab o' beef and I wonder what I could do with it.

peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...

-- A.B.

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I generally use chuck for things like pot roast, beef stew, goulash, carbonnade, chili. I prefer buying a big roast and trimming it myself and cutting it up or running it through the food processor to buying precut stew meat or chili grind. I'd be interested in more details on how you "cut the dark gristly heart" out of the thing. Also, how big was it and what internal temperature did you cook it to.

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I always sear and braise.

Nasty gristle becomes sweet sweet loveliness.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Pot au feu-trim and weight in terrine after cooking. Slice like meatloaf. Clarify broth(consomme).

Great for utilizing various kitchen skills.

hth, danny

That's fun. Ta.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I'd be interested in more details on how you "cut the dark gristly heart" out of the thing.  Also, how big was it and what internal temperature did you cook it to.

mnebergall - I just took a sharp boning knife and ran it against the flat ribbon of gristle in the meat to remove the connective tissue. It wasn't hard at all. Of course, it wasn't perfect, but it didn't need to be since I was tying it back up and roasting it. I'd say it was a 3-4 lb roast, shaped kind of like a flat cylinder. I cooked it medium rare - about 130º.

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I always sear and braise.

Nasty gristle becomes sweet sweet loveliness.

Jinmyo - when I read "Nasty gristle" I immediately thought of all those "Nasty Hobbitses" Gollum was always complaining about . . .

I like to pot roast this cut too. Very nice, my precious . . .

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I think chuck eye steaks are just about the best steak out their -- either grill or sear and bung.

Thanks for the tip snowangel. I'm on the hunt for one of these now. I did a little research and the chuck eye is a continuation of the rib eye muscle (or perhaps the rib eye is a continuation of the chuck eye). The trouble is actually finding a butcher/store who will actually merchandise them. Most of the stores and higher end places around me just don't sell it. I'm not sure if that's because of the trouble they have to go through to bone this cut out of the chuck, or because they don't want to cannibalize sales of their more expensive short loin steaks.

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I think chuck eye steaks are just about the best steak out their -- either grill or sear and bung.

I'm not sure if that's because of the trouble they have to go through to bone this cut out of the chuck, or because they don't want to cannibalize sales of their more expensive short loin steaks.

I think that you are 100% right. I'd hate to try to make a living with a custom shop in 99% of America's communities these days. Few will pay for the Top Blade Steaks, Lamb Chops, Quality Veal, Hanger Steaks, anything truly cooler aged, and I won't go on and on. Yes, in very elite areas, but not Lambertville, MI; Toledo; Findlay, OH, Clover, SC; and etc.

Carpe Carp: Seize that fish!

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I think chuck eye steaks are just about the best steak out their -- either grill or sear and bung.

Thanks for the tip snowangel. I'm on the hunt for one of these now. I did a little research and the chuck eye is a continuation of the rib eye muscle (or perhaps the rib eye is a continuation of the chuck eye). The trouble is actually finding a butcher/store who will actually merchandise them. Most of the stores and higher end places around me just don't sell it. I'm not sure if that's because of the trouble they have to go through to bone this cut out of the chuck, or because they don't want to cannibalize sales of their more expensive short loin steaks.

My butcher says one of the reasons they are rarely available is because there is so little of this on each chuck portion of the beef. Like two or four steaks or something. She also said that since they are a favorite of their's, they often don't make it to the counter :blink: . Further, she said they are far more available when the store has a sale on chuck roasts (they run through more chucks so more steaks available (and they run through more chuck roasts in the winter than summer). When my market has them (I'm friends enough with the butcher that she will call me) I stock up on them and stick them in the freezer. Prefer not to have to freeze them, but also prefer to freeze them when they are $3.58/lb than pay the going rate for ribeyes.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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snowangel,

I'm surprised there are so few chuck eye steaks on the primal. I mean - if you're selling a lot ground beef, wouldn't you be able to make a nice display of chuck eyes? Plus, if like Safeway, you're boning out the flatiron, why not do the same for the chuck eyes? It may be just a marketing decision.

The thing I appreciate with the flatiron is that it's unlikely to become the next skirt steak and rocket up in price (due to its gristly heart).

Anybody out there grilling blade steaks? Is this another piece of chuck suitable for dry heat?

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I bought a chuck blade steak the other day. Not sure what to do with it, so I shoved it in my freezer. Grilling is out - it's freezing out there! Cook's Illustrated suggested it for teriyaki. Slice it thin and stir fry? It's pretty thick, like a roast. I'm assuming it's not something to Crock Pot.

Suggestions, please...

I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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snowangel,

I'm surprised there are so few chuck eye steaks on the primal.  I mean - if you're selling a lot ground beef, wouldn't you be able to make a nice display of chuck eyes?  Plus, if like Safeway, you're boning out the flatiron, why not do the same for the chuck eyes?  It may be just a marketing decision. 

The thing I appreciate with the flatiron is that it's unlikely to become the next skirt steak and rocket up in price (due to its gristly heart).

Anybody out there grilling blade steaks?  Is this another piece of chuck suitable for dry heat?

I do think that most supermarkets that are selling ground beef or chuck are not grinding it themselves; the packaging leads me to believe this, but I could be wrong. I guess I should really look at one of those cow diagrams to figure it out, but my dad (former butcher) did agree there's not much eye in any given cow.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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My favorite is a seven bone chuck roast. I love it. It's so flavorful. I think it seems as if it stays juicier; at least to me. Then I also have a beautiful bone for my 'stockpile'.

And if you read Merle Ellis "Cutting up in the Kitchen" you can really use it. Out of print but can be found :biggrin:

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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A cut that we bring in that I have never seen in the market is a shoulder tender. I had never used the cut in the past so I am not sure exactly what it is....Maybe someone else can comment on that. Anyway, it is about the size of a pork tenderloin and is lean. I trim the silverskin, roast them and use them for little cocktail sandwiches. It is like a poor-mans tenterloin. I would not use them for an upscale entre, but they are very tender roasted mid rare. I make the leftovers into philly cheese steaks for myself...killer good.

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