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Priscilla

Dinner! 2002

1,495 posts in this topic

I find that if you use a Cornish game hen or one of those Perdue pop up timer roasters, it works wonders.

Gotta love modern tech.

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Lai fun (thick rice noodles) in mushroom consommé with sliced hua mushrooms; warm salad of agé (deep-fried) tofu triangles with pickled mango, bamboo shoots, and banana blossoms with togarashi and lime; steamed and sautéed Shanghai bok choy, yau choy, juk gai choy with peanuts and crushed red peppercorns.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Banana blossoms? Tell me more, please.


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Banana flowers. You can find them (sorta) fresh in some Asian, particularly Viet, stores. Or certainly tinned.

They're bananas before they become bananas. Banana fetuses. :wow: So they're kind of fleshy. Very interesting shapes and contours. Quite big too. Much fun to sort through with a knife to make appropriate pieces.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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This is the eGullet thread which makes me hungry!

Last night, took the reserved breast meat from a chicken cooked with many garlic cloves - already well flavored.  Sauteed some thickly sliced portobello mushrooms with chopped shallots.  Added red wine, boiled, and let it simmer until the mushrooms were tender.  Stirred in the chicken meat.  Seasoning, a little rosemary (dry unfortunately).  Resulting ragout consumed with a green salad (some crusty bread or mashed potatoes would have helped mop up the sauce).

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Last night I roasted a chicken, priming the pump with Lurpak butter, a cultured butter from Denmark that is sold at my local Persian market.  Chary about imported butter in general on account of the rancidity thing, but this was fresh and fragrant.  

Also roasted asparagus, beautiful organic asparagus from the guy at the farmer's market, among the best-tasting asparagus ever, we thought.  This seems to be a good year for asparagus.  During basting sessions I also basted the asparagus with the butter and rendering chicken fat.

Sourdough bread and apricot preserves and more of what remained in the chicken roasting pan.  Carved chicken served on a few leaves of lettuce sprinkled with tarragon vinegar.  Plenty of salt and pepper, from beginning to end.

I would dearly love to see this compendium get large and unwieldy!  Gives a person hope, doesn't it, in addition to making a person hungry, imagining all this cooking going on all around the world.  

Priscilla


Priscilla


Writer, cook, & c.


● observing #TacoFriday since 2010 ● preoccupied with road trippin' ● always ISO of the next #truckgram


Twitter Instagram  Orange Coast Magazine

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Saturday night, we ate out at a really good pizza place. We tried the pizza with garlic and cockles, and we shared another one with black olives, red onion and really good anchovies. Very good.

Sunday night I made a late, light dinner for my housemate and I: A wilted baby spinach salad with red onions, currants and balsamic vinaigrette, and some slices of baguette smeared with herbes de provence goat cheese and broiled. For dessert, we each had a shot of limoncello. Perfect.

Last night I ate a couple more of those broiled baguette slices smeared with cheese and a bowl of sugar smacks. It was late and I was tired and it was fast. I also ate a grapefruit.

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hm let's see

Saturday -- lion's head meatballs (for non-Asian foodies, these are GIANT pork meatballs with water chestnuts and ginger, the way my grandma makes them), steamed rice, stir-fried broccoli with garlic and ginger; cabbage with fried onions, shredded coconut, raisins, and green chilies; and steamed tofu topped with warm honey for dessert.

Sunday -- sauerbraten; pickled red cabbage and onions; orzo cooked in chicken stock, and served with melted butter and minced fresh chives; apple strudel.

Last night -- asparagus quiche; green salad with a simple viniagrette; french bread; fruit and cheese.

Dunno about tonight -- I think a trip to Florent is in order...

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Sauerbraten.  Love it.  Did you "pickle" the beef yourself?

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SobaAddict, do you mind sharing the recipe for Lion's Head meatballs?  They sound delish.   :smile:

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Lion's Head Meatballs (serves 4)

Meatball ingredients:

3/4 pound ground pork

1 slice ginger, minced

1/2 c. water chestnuts, minced

2 scallions, cut into thin slices

1 egg, lightly beaten

Pinch of salt (less if desired)

1 teaspoon sugar

1 tablespoon sherry

1 tablespoon light soy sauce (I use mushroom soy)

1/2 tablespoon arrowroot powder (or you can use cornstarch)

Pepper or white pepper to taste (or if you like them spicy, you can use crushed Szechuan peppercorns)

Stock ingredients:

1 cup chicken stock

1 pound bok choy, washed and cut into bite-sized pieces

3 tablespoons peanut oil for cooking

Other seasonings as desired (I use mushroom soy, 1 T. sugar, and some five-spice powder on occasion; star anise is good, if used sparingly)

1.  Place the ground pork in a bowl. Add the meatball ingredients and mix together with your hands, moving in one direction.  When the ingredients are blended, wet your hands slightly and form the pork mixture into 4 large meatballs.

2.  Heat wok and add the oil. Cook the meatballs on medium heat until they are golden brown. Drain the meatballs on paper towels.

3.  Heat the stock separately, adding soy sauce, sugar, or other seasonings if desired.

4.  Arrange the bok choy in a large pot (you could concievably use the same wok if you cleaned the wok beforehand, after cooking the meatballs) and place the meatballs on top.  Add the stock.  Simmer until cooked (1 to 1 1/2 hours).

Serves 4.

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hello all. great post.  

saturday--drinks and hors d'ouerves (spelling!) turned into dinner--hummus, baba, olives, pita bread, champagne. getting drunk.  then broke out the duck pate and mini toasts, which we let the cat help us finish off.  finally, very drunk, went to a local rest and had moules frites, red wine.  

sunday--folks over for dinner--lobster ravioli in squid ink pasta (bought at fratelli bros) and tomato sauce made the old way all day sunday.  spinach/roasted beet salad w/ goat cheese, toasted pecans, and lemon juice/olive oil dressing. foccaccia-type bread from fratelli.  choc covered strawberries.  red wine we got duty free at charles de gaulle, can't recall the name.

monday--out to dinner

today--curried couscous w/ veg & feta

let's hear from the other amateurs!

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Well, okay, I did groceries today so the kitchen is truly well stocked with fresh veggies.

Absolutely no idea what I am going to make for dinner yet but I've got plenty of inspiration

here.

I do want to add a further dimension to the thread - as we discuss the meals we cook,

could we talk about a little about the time it took to cook the food and perhaps a little

bit about our inspiration/constraints - flesh things out, give the images in my

head some dimension

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Smashed red potatoes with whole tiny cremini, spinach, rosemary, lotsa salt and cracked black pepper fried on low heat for hours in extra virgin olive oil until the uneven edges of the potatoes were densly crusty, served with a lash of hollandaise; smashed roasted chicken (served torn from the bones, arranged in a mound) with cumin and lemon; grilled peeled green asparagus, the peels fried crispy in butter as a garnish.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Sunday - roast leg of lamb, English Sunday lunch style, at my parents' house. Drank: two small glasses of some anonymous Aussie shiraz (driving a bit later). Monday - working late so fishcakes (not home-made: o tempora! O mores!), with purple sprouting broccoli from my organic vegetable box. Drank: Evian, then two pints of Dr Hexter's Wedding in the local (four doors down the street). Tuesday - had intended to make calf's liver and onion with a marsala reduction and fondue de poireaux (onions and leeks also from vegetable box) but couldn't face cooking after discovering drains blocked and spending an hour unblocking them, so had lamb jalfrezi, chapati and chana masala from local delivery service. Drank: two bottles of Budweiser Budvar (Czechvar to all you Americans). Tonight.... (drains permitting) the calf's liver and leeks. Will drink... good question. I fancy something really nice... perhaps Chateauneuf-du-Pape Chateau-Fortia '95.

Adam

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My Beloved and her friend cooked yesterday, so I came home assured of a meal of longaniza, rice and beans.  Longaniza (doubtless linguistically related to loukanika and various other sausages) is a long, skinny Dominican sausage made of coarsely ground pork and flavored with cilantro and lots of garlic.  When I came to serve myself, I discovered that other parties had enjoyed the longaniza to such a degree that only three chunks were left, each slightly under an inch long.  Yellow rice and pink beans were still available.  I had my revenge by preparing a nouvelle cuisine presentation:  the largest white plate I could find.  The three tiny pieces of sausage spaced well apart on one side of the plate, a spoonful of rice on the other side, and the bean liquid drizzled (yeah!) artistically around the edge.

Think I made my point.  Had to eat extra cheese to compensate.  At the last minute, realised there was no beer in the house, and couldn't be bothered to open wine. Drank iced whisky and soda.  Oh well...

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Potato gnocchi with a buttered mushroom sauce; cotechino with a tomato sauce; sauteed rapini with caramelized onion.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Smashed red potatoes with whole tiny cremini, spinach, rosemary, lotsa salt and cracked black pepper fried on low heat for hours in extra virgin olive oil until the uneven edges of the potatoes were densly crusty, served with a lash of hollandaise...

Jinmyo,

Can i beg you for more details? Please?

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Cooked, from Richard Olney, braised lamb with unpeeled cloves of garlic.  I added mint and sage I found outside, sauce later forced through a sieve and returned to severely deglazed pan.

He Richard Olney was adamant about not ending up with too much sauce, no more than to coat each piece of lamb, and I followed him all the way there and concluded that he was correct in this.  Simple and good.  Quite homely.  The lamb was shoulder, cut into thick chops by the clueless but pleasant meat guy, good form for the long braise.

Broccoli, cooked (through), at room temp, dressed with olive oil and vinegar and salt and pepper, large croutons with Lurpak butter and cheese melted over.

Priscilla


Priscilla


Writer, cook, & c.


● observing #TacoFriday since 2010 ● preoccupied with road trippin' ● always ISO of the next #truckgram


Twitter Instagram  Orange Coast Magazine

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Jinmyo,

Please, help me to deconstruct your dish:

It sounds so simple, but...

Do you put all the ingredients together from start, although they have different cooking times? I know that mushrooms being cooked for a long at low temperature become truly delicious, but what about spinach? Is it to melt down completely? And potatoes, are they smashed as in mashed, or kind of cracked?

Thanks!

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I have one question for you people:  where do you find the time to prepare these incredible meals?  Or are you such old hands that you just throw them together willy-nilly?

As for me, cooking is a respite from normal daily activity, and part of the contract I've been forced to make with my wardrobe is that I skip supper some nights during the week--BUT I always eat a sensible breakfast and lunch.

Monday I passed on the slop served by the dining hall and had a small salad during an awards banquet at the college--those poor students--no wonder they love fast food.  I came home and ate a Kit Kat Chunky bar and drank a decaf cappucino on my porch as the sun set.

Tuesday I went to bed at 9, no supper.

Tonight I'm making a light supper, couscous salad with some vine-ripened tomatoes and sweet corn brought back by hubbie form Fla., as wel as steamed broccoli and snap peas, spinahc, green bell peppers and red onion--I'll dress the whole thing with extra virgin olive oil and fresh lemon juice.  Stellabouli.  I'm hoping to graze off it the rest of the week.

Tomorrow night my husband wants to cook pasta--he sautees veggies and adds oragnic sauce--he's not a particularly inspired cook, but he taught me how to bake with yeast and can tomatoes, so he has his strengths.

Friday my yoga teacher and I are duplicating the Indian meal we learned in our Indian cooking class Sunday:  pakoras, green chutney, moong dahl and broken wheat kichadi, kadhi, and besan burphi.  Can't wait!

Priscilla, I run my sponges and the sink stopper through the sink at least once a week or whenever I think it needs done.

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Tuesday 16 April

Vegetarian version of pad thai (classic Thai noodle dish), based on the recipe in Terry Durack's fantastic cookbook "Noodle". If you fancy cooking Asian-style noodles at home, this book is a winner. Being a weeknight - we try to keep Monday-to-Friday cooking as healthy as possible - we added lots of extra julienne vegetables to the pad thai.

Wednesday 17 April

The most amazing home-made ravioli, from the freezer. My husband made it the other weekend. Even after cooking, the ravioli dough was bright yellow from the organic free-range eggs he used. (I recall someone in a home-made pasta thread being disturbed by their pasta going grey, post-cooking. Free-range organic eggs will likely rectify that problem.)

Ravioli filling was a pureed mixture of swiss brown mushrooms sauted with shallots and garlic, a few tiny, pitted, oil-preserved olives from a store that imports great Italian products, and some young goats cheese. There may have been something else in there. Parsley, perhaps?

Last night, simmered ravioli was tossed through hot olive oil, in which Grahame had fried anchovies, shallots and garlic. Served with freshly grated Parmesan and chopped parsley. Big salad of red capsicum, cucumber and tomato on the side.

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Helena, I boiled some red potatoes about the size of eggs. Drained them, ran cold water over them. Smashed them up into pieces with the heel of my hand. Got them going in a deep skillet with extra virgin olive oil (Cletos, from the home village of one of my grocers). I seasoned them well with kosher salt and fresh cracked black pepper. I flipped them several times, then turned them down to low for about 45 minutes. I brushed clean the cremini and added them during the last hour. I added some dry rosemary. Tossed everything around, added more oil. When I began deboning the roasted chicken I added baby spinach leaves and some fresh rosemary, toss, toss.

I arranged the potatoes in bowls, with a small ladle rapidly lashed a few ribbons of holandaisse over them.

That's it.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Well, I can only answer for myself, stellabella -- I do a lot of prep ahead of time.  You'd be surprised what a good return investment a mandoline, a crock pot and a stock pot can do for you.  For example, if I know I'm doing a dinner party, up to one week in advance I'll make a whole lot of stock (usually chicken; sometimes vegetable if there's die-hard vegetarians in the mix).  Otherwise I usually have about 1 or 2 quarts of stock in the freezer; everything else can be prepped in short order.

For example, the sauerbraten required marinating four days in advance, so I started that last Thursday.  The steamed tofu with honey (one of the simplest desserts you could possibly have -- its just tofu and honey; perfect for vegetarians who don't eat eggs) took about 15 minutes.  The lion's head meatballs, I made the day before, and just finished cooking them Saturday evening.  Much of what goes on in my kitchen is manageable if you can divide up your time in bite-sized pieces.

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I enjoy this thread because it gives me some 'do-able' ideas!

 This week was roast beef with another night of roast beef open face sandwiches.

  Chicken curry w. condiments and rice........

  This am I dedicated to trying to replicate Paris's [raspberry] macaroons...which we enjoyed w. grilled loin lamb chops,

israeli couscous [a frist try...I made it too soggy] and oven roasted ratatouille. Tomorrow is cold poached salmon w. a watercress mayo sauce.

  We don't do so well w. leftovers around here. I enjoy the fried rice and omelettes.........but not my spouse.  

   I am in the process of marinating some short ribs with the idea of serving them on Sat or Sun.

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