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"Best Of" New Restos in Paris 2004


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I thought it might be fun, in this week of “Best of’s….” to start a discussion of the Best New Restaurants in Paris in 2004. To get the ball rolling, here’s my list (rank-ordered) of places that opened this year:

La Cerisaie

Le Regalade, post-Camdeborde

Temps au Temps

Vieux Chene

Le Petrelle

L’Abadache

L’Ecallier

Fables of Fontaine

Pinxo

Mon Vieil Ami

Les Papilles

La Table de Lauriston

I have not been to the new Hiramatsu, Le Meurice, La Table de Lancaster or Les Ambassadeurs under Piegé, but my best friends here who have, would rate them:

Le Meurice

La Table de Lancaster

I would implore those members reading this who know the scene much better than I to post their “Best Of 2004” lists too - you know who you are, don’t be bashful – Zouave, Felice, raisab, Pierre45, fresh_a, Carlsbad, paga, pim, pan, John Whiting, Bux, Robert Brown, Jonathan Day, Gabrielle Claudine, etc., etc., etc. (Apologies to those I left out – I had one too many calva’s today).

John Talbott

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Good premise John. I tried Le Meurice and even though it is not new this year, Yannick Alleno is, and it was my favorite "new" spot followed by Mon Vieil Ami, Les Ormes(new location),L'Acajou, De La Garde, L'Ourcine, Fables de la Fontaine. After Le Meurice I quibble somewhat with my wife about the pecking order.

Felice, let's hear from you.

Edited by Laidback (log)
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Hi John.

I would go with in this order;

L'Ourcine

La Regalade

La Cerisaie

Temps au Temps

L'Entredgeu

Unfortunately I haven't tried all the new restos yet as I mix up old and new every month. This week I will be trying Mon Vieil Ami (per your suggestion). Le Vieux Chene is on my list for this month as is La Maison du Jardin (not new but new to me). So many restaurants...so little time!

Bonne Annee! :biggrin: Enjoy your Calvas!

Edited by raisab (log)

Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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I thought it might be fun, in this week of “Best of’s….” to start a discussion of the Best New Restaurants in Paris in 2004.  To get the ball rolling, here’s my list (rank-ordered) of places that opened this year:

Unfortunately, my “to-do” list of restaurants is a lot longer than the ones I’ve actually tried as my budget doesn’t allow me to eat out as often as I would like. And like Raisab I have a long list of restaurants that I’d like to try that don’t fall into the “new”category.

Here are the newer restaurants that I have tried this year and liked, but in no particular order really.

Les Papilles (a few times, since it’s close by)

Chiberta

L'Ourcine

Mon Vieil Ami

La Bistro Lauriston

Café Constant

L’Entredgeu

Frugier

And here are a few that I would like to try in the near future (and that I can realistically afford)

La Cerisaie

Le Temps au Temps (I tried to go last week, but they were closed for the holidays)

Le Regalade, (again, since Ive been when Yves Camdeborde has the Chef)

Les Vivres (I think that’s the name anyway)

L’ Ami Marcel

L’Ami Jean

De La Garde

Pinxo

I’m sure there are others

And the not-so-new places I’ve been to this year and enjoyed. Again, this is just off the top of my head and in no sort of order.

L’Astrance

Aux Lyonnaise

La Beurre Noisette

Chez Michel

Le Clos des Gourmets

Les Bouquinistes

Le Troquet

Café des Delice

Le Timbre

La Famille

Numerous Japanese

Le Pre Verre

Le Petit Pointoise

La Cremerie Wine Bar

Azabu

Bistro du Dome

La Villaret

C’Amelot

La Cave L'Os à Moelle

Pasta Linea—a delicious Italien Epicerie in the Marais that has a few tables.

Fish (at least twice a month, if not more, because it’s in my neighborhood)

www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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Unfortunately, my “to-do” list of restaurants is a lot longer than the ones I’ve actually tried as my budget doesn’t allow me to eat out as often as I would like.  And like Raisab I have a long list of restaurants that I’d like to try that don’t fall into the “new”category.

Budget is certain a factor in our case as well, but not nearly so much as the fact that we're luck to spend a week, if that in Paris each year. Between the old places to which we've never been, the ones we've enjoyed and want to experience anew, and the places that have opened since our last visit, lies a sea of frustration. I find it hard enough to compare two dissimilar restaurants let alone pretend to have an opinion of where they belong in the grand scheme of things.

We ate at Pinxo and Chiberta. Both of these were decent enough places and certainly not bad buys by Parisian standards, but both were a bit disappointing in ways I've already mentioned when I came back from Paris. I thought the food at Pinxo lacked a spark. It was what it was and I expected some transformation of the ingredients or some spark that I didn't find. By comparison, a lunch at Aux Lyonnaise was memorable. Aux Lyonnaise wasn't a new restaurant, but it had undergone a change of chefs and was reportedly inferior to what it was last year. This year we were with a group of five and had a better chance to survey the dishes. I had almost the same menu I had the previous year and suffered the only disappointment of the group. The potatoes accompanying my calves liver showed signs of reheating and were definitely inferior to the ones served at our earlier visit. The blood sausage from Iparla in the Pays Basque was vaut le voyage. Largely, this is good old fashioned French food. Overall a notch down from last year, but still an excellent value, and if anything I'd expect improvement. For me, it beats the pants off Benoit at half the price although it aspires to simpler and more rustic food.

The food at Chiberta was excellent and a fair value. Too many tourists in the room took an edge off the meal. I don't think it was as much that they spoke English as it was that they were so unfamiliar with the style of the meal. It's hard to explain and I think it's an early warning reaction to the fear that a restaurant can only be as good as the clientele demands. The real objection perhaps was to what I thought the restaurant wanted to be -- a place to get good food for the modern traveler and Parisian alike who didn't want to spend the entire night dining. We were rushed. The pace was much too fast and tables turned faster than they do in Manhattan. I like to savor my food and spend a few minutes talking to Mrs. B between courses.

The food at l'Astrance was surprisingly sedate and conservative compared to our visit a few year's back. It was hardly old fashioned or traditional though. Prices have risen, though not particularly unexpectedly and it was a genuinely satisfying experience though less creative than we expected. This is not a new restaurant, but it seemed a different one for us.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Thanks for getting the ball rolling John.

Le Meurice is definitely on top of the list for the new-ish top places. Yannick Alléno is doing some fabulous stuff. The last time I had dinner there he made up a menu for us and it sure knocked our socks off (haven't written it up though--will do shortly).

I was less impressed by Les Ambassadeurs but in all fairness I've only been to one lunch. I'll have dinner there soon I hope before I form a stronger opinion. I've also heard good things about Eric Frechon from trusted sources, and will have to give his food a try as well.

For bistros, lots of the places I like are not exactly new this year, except for L'Ourcine. But the new-ish places are:

L'Entredgeu

Mon Vieil Ami

L'Ourcine

Les Fables de la Fontaine

Café Constant

L'Ami Jean has been there a long time but I guess the new chef counts.

I've only had one lunch at La Régalade post Camdeborde and didn't like it much.

Edited by pim (log)

chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

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Margaret Kemp, who writes about food in Karen Fawcett’s Bonjour Paris, (which one must subscribe to), lists her “Best of Buzz 2004” as follows (coordinates given only for the lesser known):

Chiberta

Dans le Noir

Les Fables de la Fontaine

L’Entredgeu

Pasco, 74, bd de la Tour Maubourg in the 7th, Metro Invalides, 01.44.18.33.26, running 15-24€ a la carte, serving Mediterranean food

Le Murano

La Table de Robuchon

Apicius

La Poele d’Or, 37, rue Miromesnil in the 8th, Metro Miromesnil, 01.42.65.78.60, her favorite place, closed weekends

Dominique Bouchet, 11, rue Treilhard in the 8th, 01.45.61.09.46 metro Miromesnil, closed weekends

Les Ormes

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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This is my list of the best 2004 new restaurants in paris

-Le meurice

-Les ormes, in their new location

-L'entredgeu

-L'ourcine

-Au petit marguery under new management

-Pavillon des princes.Gilles epie's new restaurant

-La grande rue.It opened in late 2003

-La chaumiere

-les papilles

-Thierry burlot

-la table du Lauriston

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This is my list of the best 2004 new restaurants in paris

-Le meurice

-Les ormes, in their new location

-L'entredgeu

-L'ourcine

-Au petit marguery under new management

-Pavillon des princes.Gilles epie's new restaurant

-La grande rue.It opened in late 2003

-La chaumiere

-les papilles

-Thierry burlot

-la table du Lauriston

Can you tell me something about Gilles Epié's place? He seemed to arrive and depart from La Petite Cour very quickly and I never heard what had happened nor where he went next. Where is Pavillon des Princes and what's it like?

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Can you tell me something about Gilles Epié's place?  He seemed to arrive and depart from La Petite Cour very quickly and I never heard what had happened nor where he went next.  Where is Pavillon des Princes and what's it like?

He sure did. One day it was announced he was at the Petite Cour the next day he left. I went after he'd left but before it hit the newspapers and was very annoyed. So, I'm curious how the Pavillon des Princes is working out.

It's on the Southern edge of the Bois de Boulogne, 69 avenue de Porte d'Auteuil, metro the same name. It was nice but I don't know if he's changed the decor.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I reviewed le pavillon des princes a few months ago,where i quoted gilles epie's reasons for leaving la petite cour.It was disagreements with his partners.I had a long conversation with him.i think he is trying to regain his 1 star. His menu is similar to la petite cour.

Go and enjoy this restaurant before it gets overun by tourists.

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