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The Soup Topic (2005–2006)


maggiethecat
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I will definitely make this again in the future.  It really shows off the flavor of parsnips, which I think are a much underappreciated vegetable and are one of my favorites.

My favorite parsnip soup is curried parsnip soup. The spicy homemade currypowder really balances the sweet parsnips very well.

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I will definitely make this again in the future.  It really shows off the flavor of parsnips, which I think are a much underappreciated vegetable and are one of my favorites.

My favorite parsnip soup is curried parsnip soup. The spicy homemade currypowder really balances the sweet parsnips very well.

Klary:

Several recipes for Curried Parsnip soup came up when I was looking for inspiration and I was about to make it when I found the Honey-Roasted recipe.

I'll probably try Curried next time. Sounds delicious!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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We haven't had any winter weather to speak of, either. It is now 70 F. The day after New Year's we went fishing in bright sunshine and 75. :blink:

But, I like soup anyway. Yesterday, by way of an experiment, I cooked a half pound of black beans in my La Chamba bean pot. I had sauteed a bit of shallots (I was out of onions and the shallots needed using) with some "pureed" garlic and about an inch of "pureed" ginger root. I don't know why. It needed using too, I guess. Also, I am now in love all over again with my Microplane. You wouldn't believe how well it works on garlic and ginger.

Today, I decided I didn't want to eat beans but I did want to eat bean soup. I checked out RecipeGullet and found =Mark's Black Bean Soup. I tasted the beans and the allspice seemed to fit so I added some. I also liked the idea of the tomato sauce. I heated it all up and whizzed with my Bamix. (I got to play with two of my favorite toys!)

This stuff is really good. It is sort of a Caribbean bean soup.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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we are supposed to get some freezing rain so it was clean out the fridge day and a vegetable soup. froze 1 and 2 cup containers of the turkey stock i made and then used the rest. carrots, carmelized onions, garlic, thyme, a bay leaf, reconstituted mushrooms, wild rice, salt and pepper.....

will have it for dinner(with some to freeze for our lunches and mother-in-law #1) with some cheddar biscuits. and there is a piece of sweet potato pie left.........

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I will definitely make this again in the future.  It really shows off the flavor of parsnips, which I think are a much underappreciated vegetable and are one of my favorites.

My favorite parsnip soup is curried parsnip soup. The spicy homemade currypowder really balances the sweet parsnips very well.

Could not resist making this curried parsnip soup today as I LOVE parsnips. It was delicious. I had all the ingredients even those to make the curry spice. Thanks, Klary.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Last New Year's I ate a prix fixe meal at Ici in NYC. There was a chestnut soup that was yummy and unusual enough that I wrote and asked for the recipe. The chef graciously obliged. I thought I'd share it in this thread. It's labor-intensive enough that you might want to save it for a special occasion. Though if you can find peeled chestnuts, that would make the prep a whole lot easier.

I'm pretty sure I tweaked this recipe a bit here and there, but I can't recall the specifics. In any case, credit should go to Ici's chef, whose name escapes me at the moment.

Chestnut, Apple & Celery Root Soup

1 pound raw chestnuts

half of a large leek, white part only (2½ ounces)

butter

½ pound trimmed celery root

2 large, or 3 small apples

bay leaf

white pepper

salt

ground star anise

1 cup chicken stock

1 cup water

1 cup cream

Soak the chestnuts overnight in water to cover. Drain them and place them in a large pot with plenty of water. Bring to a boil and allow them to simmer vigorously for 1½ hours. When they have boiled, remove a few chestnuts at a time, leaving the rest in the hot water, and peel them of the outer shells and the inner skins. The heat and moisture will make them easier to peel. It becomes harder to peel them as they dry and cool. Discard or trim any spoiled chestnuts. When you have peeled them all and trimmed them, you should have ¾ pound of chestnut meats. Set them aside.

Clean, dry, and finely mince the half leek. In a large pot, sweat the leek in plenty of butter over very low heat for 10 minutes. Do not allow the leek to color. Meanwhile, small dice the celery root. Peel and core the apples and dice them too. Add them both, along with the chestnuts, to the pot with the leeks, adding more butter if necessary. (The ingredients will tend to absorb the butter as they cook.) Add a bay leaf, some white pepper and salt to taste, as well as a very little star anise. Stir the ingredients well and allow them to sweat over medium-low heat for 15-20 minutes. Watch the pot carefully so that the ingredients do not begin to brown.

Add the chicken stock and the water. The liquid should be just enough to barely cover the ingredients. Bring the pot to a strong simmer and reduce to low. Allow the pot to simmer for 20 minutes. Remove the bay leaf, then completely puree the ingredients in batches in a food processor. Return the puree to the pan and add 1 cup of cream, or as much as to your taste. Heat the soup through and sample, adjusting the seasonings to taste.

Notes: Increase the ratio of celery root to chestnuts and apples for a less sweet and carborific meal. Jazz it up by serving with a garnish of roasted chestnuts, celery greens or sautéed apple slices.

Edited by lyagushka (log)
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Yesterday I did a black bean soup in the crock pot - I was testing it for a column, but it turned into dinner. It's really soup weather now and it hit the spot. (black beans, green pepper, jalapeno, celery, carrot, onion, cumin, chili powder, garlic slow cooked and pureed - garnished with heaps of sour cream, cheddar cheese, cilantro and a good squeeze of fresh lime).

Today was my version (kosher) of chicken gumbo. Onion, celery, green pepper, okra, rice, tomato, chicken, jalapeno, rice, chili powder and garlic. Hearty and tasty.

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Today was my version (kosher) of chicken gumbo.  Onion, celery, green pepper, okra, rice, tomato, chicken, jalapeno, rice, chili powder and garlic.  Hearty and tasty.

Are you aware that you can get kosher andouille sausage? (The company is called Neshama, you might have seen them at Kosherfest)

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I'd bought two pounds of parsnips at the Reading Terminal Market earlier this week thinking I'd turn them into a side veggie.  Tonight I got inspired to make soup out of them instead.  I Googled up a recipe for Honey Roasted Parsnip Soup and with some minor variations in ingredients and techniques made a delicious soup for dinner...

This is just a fantastic soup!

I went through my fridge to make room for groceries on shopping day and while I generally throw any tired veggies into a mixed soup such as minestrone, this time I made a variety of single-serving soups: Roasted Parsnip, Sweet Potato and Carrot and finally, Mushroom Soup from Les Halles cookbook. Lunches for me all week. Much more fun than a single mixed veg soup. :smile:

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Are you aware that you can get kosher andouille sausage? (The company is called Neshama, you might have seen them at Kosherfest)

At the moment I can't. The best sausage I can get it more of a cooked hotdog - not bad for a hot dog, not great for a sausage. At least I can't find a source that is shipping or can ship to Canada - but I have an order coming from my meat supplier next week and I asked them to send me some casings - so I'm going to try my hand at making some sausage myself. We'll see how it goes :blink:

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Clam chowder here tonight. I used canned clams (yes, I know, but it is what was available). My kids and husband loved it. Heavy on the clams. I should have diced the potatoes a little smaller, and included more milk. My kids are growing up. They are liking "thin" soups. Peter said "This is yummy. Next time I want more of the thin stuff!"

I'm sure some of you will poo-poo canned clams, but with those, this is one of those soups that can be on the table in under half and hour, and it is one that the kids can be really involved in. Those dicing the potatoes, draining the clams, softening the onions, etc. moments. Learning. Learning how to cook, how to measure, learning about fractions and proportions, the contrast in textures.

This meal will stand out as magical in more ways than just the end product.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Katie's post about her parsnip soup inspired me -- so I made my own version. Parsnips, a single carrot, leek, thyme and stock. Pureed it all up. Quite tasty.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Clam chowder here tonight...I'm sure some of you will poo-poo canned clams, but with those, this is one of those soups that can be on the table in under half and hour....

I most certainly would not sniff at canned clams. I use them too to make canned (and crammed) chowder and you are right, it gets a filling meal on the table in record time. In fact, now that you mention it, I think it will be on my menu this coming week.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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As you guys have probably noticed, we are having an eG spotlight Conversation with Sara Moulton this week. A couple of weeks ago, we finally got a bit of cool weather and I tried this recipe for Oven Baked Chowder from her new book, Sara's Secrets for Weeknight Meals. (This is one of the recipes that Sara so graciously allowed us to put into RecipeGullet.)

Most of you know me as an inattentive sort and, because of that, I gravitate to recipes that I can put in the oven and pretty much ignore. (I don't do much grilling.) I simmer all kinds of things in the oven. I have been doing stock that way for years. Same with chili. And I am in love with all kinds of braises. This recipe really intrigued me. For one thing, I would have never thought of using this technique on a chowder. I can see its versatility for all sorts of things. But . . . being true to the original cook, I did it by the book this first time around.

I was a bit suspicious of the relatively high temperature (375 degrees F) as I do braises at 250 or less, but I forged ahead. I did use my thin slice disc in my food processor for the potatoes, celery and onions. The slices aren't as pretty as they would be with knife work but I wanted to see how well it would do and I was keeping track of the prep time as stated in the book -- 15 minutes. Thirty minutes in, the veggies were just right. I laid the fish filets on top (grouper was my best choice at the market) and another thirty minutes brought them to perfection.

Final verdict . . . This is delicious! I will definitely do this again. I will also think of ways to adapt the technique to other ideas. Let's eat.

gallery_7796_409_8970.jpg

Ok . . . I got a bit carried away with the paprika but I am a paprika freak. And I do have to confess that I actually didn't do the recipe by the book. About half way through that bowl of chowder, I realized that I had completely forgotten the thyme. I added some when I reheated for my next serving and all was right with the world. The only thing I might do differently next time is use heavy cream 'cause I ain't scared of no butter fat and my cholesterol is just fine, thank you.

I was able to do the prep in 15 minutes but I had to hurry myself and stay focused. I am sure that someone more accomplished than I am would have no trouble. And there is that thing about liking to piddle and getting distracted.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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tuesday night was a winter squash soup - onion, garlic, carrot, bay leaf, butternut squash, oven roasted cherry tomatoes and stock and- the last 5 minutes - baby spinach then served with a splash of sherry vinegar.

foccacia on the side - john said this one was a keeper

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi All,

I am still rather new to EGullet, but when I found this forum, I knew I had found another home. I love to make soups from scratch!!! :wub: I have been on a bone-broth kick this year, since I have a great resource for grass-fed meats.

Yesterday I made a rich meat stock, preparing for a ox-tail soup, and a rich lamb stock. Both of these stocks simmered for 24 hours. The lamb broth went into a Lentil, Lamb and Rosemary soup that we enjoyed for lunch today, with toasted homemade whole-wheat sourdough bread:

gallery_40263_2501_241650.jpg

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Hi Lynnette! Welcome to eGullet. There's lots of kindred spirits here, whether you're into homemade soup, baking, wine, cocktails, or whatever. It's a fine bunch of obsessives that hang around here so you should be able to learn a lot.

Tell me about your bone broth...What method do you use to prepare it? Sounds like a very flavorful and delicious start to any soup.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Tell me about your bone broth...What method do you use to prepare it?  Sounds like a very flavorful and delicious start to any soup.

Bone Broths are easy. First, you need several pounds of boney cuts. Knucklebones, soup bones, neck bones, ox-tails - all have enough cartilage to release gelatin to the stock. IF you can get it, a hoof, cut into pieces, adds a lot, I'm told.

For chicken, older stewing hens make the best stock, and with these, use the necks, and chicken feet if you can get them.

I roast the meat and bones until well browned, and then put them in a large stockpot. This step is optional, but it gives better color and flavor to the stock, IMO. Cover with water, and add 1/4-cup vinegar to the meat stock and 2 T vinegar to the poultry (I use a wine vinegar). The acidic bath helps release the gelatin. Let this sit 1 hour and them move the stockpot to the stove and bring to a gentle simmer. Do not boil!

I let the stock simmer until it finishes foaming, lifting the scum as it forms. When it clears, I add the vegetables and aromatics (onion, stuck with three cloves, a bulb of garlic, 2 carrots, 1 stalk celery and about 9 peppercorns). I add bay to the meat, and leeks if I have them, to either. Herbs are added when I make soup.

Chicken stock simmers for a total of 8 hours and meat stocks, 24. When done, I strain and refrigerate the broth. The next day, I lift the fat and either make soup, or reduce and freeze in cubes. Stock made this way has a lot of body and is almost silky on the tongue. See the WAPF link too:

http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/broth.html

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I'm still on a parsnip kick. This weekend it was a parsnip/corriander/apple soup. Perfect for the cold weather.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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lynnette - love your stocks!! can i come and play? unfortuntly johnnybird can't stand the smell of lamb so i have to wait till he is away for me to play with it. wish i had some of that soup - it looks wonderful. since i still have leftover soup none of that today but a soupy braise of pork, chicken sausages and meatballs over ziti....

love this thread.....

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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lynnette - love your stocks!!  can i come and play?  unfortuntly johnnybird can't stand the smell of lamb so i have to wait till he is away for me to play with it. wish i had some of that soup - it looks wonderful.  since i still have leftover soup none of that today but a soupy braise of pork, chicken sausages and meatballs over ziti....

love this thread.....

Hi Suzi...

Where do you live? I am in southern MN, and if you are close, sure, come and play in the kitchen with me!

Lynnette

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I finally finished the ox-tail soup this weekend :biggrin: !! I started by making a 24-hour beef broth from meaty bones and ox-tails and the requisite vegetables, and after chilling and de-fatting that, simmered more ox-tails in the broth for another 8 hours. This was again chilled, with the meat picked from the ox-tails and later defatted. The final broth was made into the Epicurious recipe for OXTAIL SOUP WITH RED WINE AND ROOT VEGETABLES http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/102123 (NO canned soup!!! I added a half of a rutabaga and some reconstituted porcini mushrooms and their liquid.) The broth was a rich mahogany color with lots of flavor! YUM!

gallery_40263_2501_473344.jpg

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I love lentil soups. They're so hearty and filling. So, when I found a recipe for Curried Lentil soup with tomatoes and spinach, I knew I had to make it. It was a perfect soup for a cold night.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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