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Panettone


jackal10
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molds can be purchased at sur la table or you might try your local artisan bakery.

panettone without the fruit: you might need to make the dough a little dryer since the fruit contribute a lot of body. another product might be more suitable like la mouna.

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as we are starting germany´s first cupcake bakery we were also looking for those panettone liners. you can buy them at this austrian company, the cool thing is that they heve em in all sizes, from mini up to big... be sure to use a traditional recipe though, and substitute 10% starch to make the crumb more delicate. if you want to go traditional use a sourdough. after baking you need to hang the panettones upsidedown for min. 3 to 5 hours...

http://www.ried-foodpack.at/produkte_fur/b...itor/index.html

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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I've decided that it's time to get back into to bread making after a 5 year hiatus and I'm going to start with a Panettone. Does anyone have a really good recipe and some really good advice? I know that it's a long process, but are there any other factors involved in making this.

I figure this will be a good workout for my Kitchenaid. :raz:

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  • 11 months later...

This is my Year of the Panettone, in which I plan to finally perfect making it. Commercial versions have "that flavor" that I haven't been able to reproduce. Is it really fior di sicilia, or is KAF just trying to make a buck? Is it rum? (Not sure). Is it honey? (Don't think so). Is it grated lemon rind (That's probably part of it). Orange oil? (Maybe). Orange flower water? (If so, not much of it).

Help! Does anyone have thoughts on this?

-Mary

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If you perfect it, merrybaker, I hope you'll be so kind as to come share some tips with me. I love pannettone, and I've made a few that were pretty, but none of it was as good as the ones Ive bought at the store.

I'm not familiar with fior di sicilia -- whats in it? To me, pannettone tastes like amaretto and citrus.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I love fiori di Sicilia, although not everyone here agrees. Every person who's eaten something I baked with it has asked some variation of "what is that flavor?" Get some. It's mysteriously good, and you only need a tiny bit. I think I'm on my third bottle after using it for about 6-7 years.

There's a long thread on pannetone here somewhere, by the way, from which I took away, basically, "don't bother, you can never make it as good as the boxed Italian stuff."

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I used to make a really good panettone that combined two recipes I copied from the book store. :wink: My recipe used grappa (or was it brandy) to soak the raisins and lemon zest. Lately I have been unhappy with what I have found in the store. I don't know if I still have my old recipe.

Robin

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Mary,

The flavor that I think you are describing is merely the melding of the aforementioned flavors: vanilla, citrus, honey, orange flower water.

Given the right ratio you should obtain a satisfactory result: a compelling aroma that is quintessential panettone.

Happy baking,

Rob

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Well, I broke down and ordered the Fiori di Sicilia from KAF. I guess that's the only way I'll know for sure.

Meanwhile, I made this panettone that was adapted from Nick Malgieri:

http://www.annamariavolpi.com/glazed_panettone.html

I used a touch more salt and baked it in a taller-and-thinner pan, but otherwise followed the recipe exactly. Used KAF-AP flour. Unfortunately I baked it a little too long, but I warm it in the MW, and you'd never know.:wink:

No, it doesn't have "the taste," but the taste it does have is very nice and buttery, and it has that nice panettone shred. And I gotta tell ya, the topping is fantastic! It's a thin, crisp layer like an almond-macaroon, and with sliced almonds and powd. sugar on top of that. Oh my, I think I'll have another piece right now...

-Mary

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I have to say that I dont have in any recipe for Panettone , the use of fiori di sicilia.

The use of pasta acida ( sour dough or mother dough ) is essential for the real panettone and the process is very very long.The aroma used in it are usally candied orange, candied cedro ( wich is a typical citrus , kinda like a big lemon but isnt a lemon )vanilla , they also use a panettone flavor wich has a great buttery flavor and all the rest.And cocoa butter is an essetnial ingredient as well , in the preparation of panettone e pandoro.

The starter is quite different form the one we use here for sour dough bread , its more complicated to keep and mantain , because it requires an everyday care.

Vanessa

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I have to say that I dont have in any recipe for Panettone , the use of fiori di sicilia.

The use of pasta acida ( sour dough or mother dough ) is essential for the real panettone and the process is very very long.The aroma used in it are usally candied orange, candied cedro ( wich is a typical citrus , kinda like a big lemon but isnt a lemon )vanilla , they also use a panettone flavor wich has a great buttery flavor and all the rest.And cocoa butter is an essetnial ingredient as well , in the preparation of panettone e pandoro.

The starter is quite different form the one we use here for sour dough bread , its more complicated to keep and mantain , because it requires an everyday care.

Cedro is Citron.

I also don't have any recipes that call for fiori di sicilia. I have made homemade panetonne and although it was very good, it is not the same as the ones I bought in the pastry shoppe in Milano.

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And cocoa butter is an essetnial ingredient as well

Cocoa butter is an intriguing idea. I've used it in candy making, but never as a separate ingredient in baking. I'm thinking it could add flavor to many non-chocolate desserts. Thanks for the idea.

This task is beginning to look even more impossible/complicated than I had thought.:sad:

-Mary

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I made the pannetone that merrybaker references above, once last night, and again today. Last night I followed the directions for the amount of dried fruit and today I added more, and also some cocoa nibs. Delicious. Definitely going into my notebook. I took a picture of last night's, but I can't upload it to aol because it won't run on my computer right now. I used grated fresh orange and tangerine rind, soft dried pineapple and dried cranberries. It somehow has that pannetone flavor.

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Cocoa butter is an intriguing idea. I've used it in candy making, but never as a separate ingredient in baking. I'm thinking it could add flavor to many non-chocolate desserts. Thanks for the idea.

I think the cocoa butter is for texture or as a preservative, not for flavor. For anyone interested in the use of cocoa butter and sourdough in these types of breads, there is a very complete recipe for a Pandoro in Artisan Baking Across America that uses both. I've tried it twice with pretty decent results, but I have been unable to get the proper "shred" texture to the bread shown in the book.

Edited by rickster (log)
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And here's advice for those wondering what to do with leftover panettone.

That was so much fun! Time magazine knew what it was doing.
I took a picture of last night's, but I can't upload it

I hope we get to see it. The topping makes it look extra special.
We also have another panetonne thread that might help.

Panetonne

Thanks, I've made notes for future experiments.
there is a very complete recipe for a Pandoro in Artisan Baking Across America

I didn't think to look in her book. Good idea!

So I got my F di S from KAF and made the recipe exactly the same as the first time, but with F di S. (I overbaked the second one, also, although that hadn't been my plan!) I calculated the amount of F di S based on a KAF recipe. It worked out to 3/4 tsp., which is probably a little high. The raw dough didn't smell strongly of it, but it did taste strongly of it. After baking, the taste is less and is mellowing every day.

Is it "the flavor"? It certainly tastes like a lot of (cheap) panettones that I've had. It tastes like vanilla mixed with very bitter orange rind. I candy my own orange rind for these things, and the F di S reminds me of the flavor of the rind before all the bitterness has been boiled out. KAF says a substitute for 1/2 teaspoon is 1 teaspoon vanilla + 1/8 tsp. orange oil. I might prefer that -- could use top-quality vanilla plus Boyajian orange oil, which has a pretty good flavor. Grated zest sounds good, too, although I haven't seen that as an ingredient on any labels.

Part of the problem is that my taste is changing. I'm not sure I want that "all taste alike" panettone flavor any more. The flavor of butter and real fruit is more appealing at this point. Where I once looked at my husband in stark terror when he suggested adding chocolate chips, I'm now actually considering it.

I still plan to try recipes from Sunset, Artisan Baking, Gale Gand, Italian Cooking magazine, and a few others. They range from simple one-day recipes to 9-yolk, several-day affairs. By that time we'll be really, really sick of panettone, and I can turn to something else!

-Mary

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I forgot to mention that the F di S does have a very perfumey taste/scent which permeates the bread. It reminds me of orange flower water, which I'm not fond of. That's why I think vanilla + zest/oil would be a good alternative.

That's all for now... unless I think of something else I forgot. :smile:

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I was schlepping through the pastry shops and bakeries on Hanover St. in Boston's North End last week, reading labels on all the panettone. Margarine..mono and di glycerides, artificial flavors. We get one at the earthy crunchy groceria that will still be soft and edible till late March. I got a bunch of paper baking pans to make some more petite ones, hopefully tomorrow afternoon. If I get home early enough, I'm making some more stollen also. I use the recipe in Artisan Baking. Good stuff.

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Whether fiori di Sicilia does or does not belong in panettone, 3/4 tsp is really a lot! I can't imagine using more than 1/4 tsp in anything, and mostly I only use a couple of drops. Otherwise it will definitely be bitter.

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