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jackal10

Panettone

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I am getting ready to make the Cranberry Pistachio Panettone.

It is my first time and I don't have a coffee can or a Panettone paper form to bake it in. I am going to try an experiment rigging a pan with baking paper and see what happens.

Wish me luck.

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Good luck! Let us know how it turns out.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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So far, so good.....

My makeshift Panettone Mold

gallery_8006_298_1105726778.jpg

And the dough before baking

gallery_8006_298_1105726849.jpg

The Panetonne are in the oven. I made the second one in a tube pan.

I wish we had smellavision......

gallery_8006_298_1105728278.jpg

This Panettone smells wonderful, the proof will be in the tasting after dinner. I will post my results.


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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I have more panettone than I know what to do with too. Last night I went to the store I bought my first panettone at, a Meijer's store in Louisville. In december, they had the 2.2lb Maina Gran Panettone for $6. I checked back just to see if they were on sale, and they were - 50% off. But here's the thing - I go to the check-out and scan it, and its not $3, its $1.50! This is the very same panettone that Amazon 'gourmet' sells for $15! The box has an expiration date sometine in June, so I bought 4 of them. Of course I will give some away as gifts. Maybe. 

Looks like my new year's diet might have to wait!

Try making bread pudding with the panettone. It is wonderful.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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The cranberry and pistachio panettone is delicious. It gives off such a lovely aroma.

It was easy to make and has a very nice moist crumb. The only thing I would change is that I will add more lemon zest and orange zest or I will try it with the optional candied orange and lemon peel.

I think that the texture is much better than the panettone I used to buy in Milano.

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Thanks for the pictures and report Michelle. It looks wonderful.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I have more panettone than I know what to do with too. Last night I went to the store I bought my first panettone at, a Meijer's store in Louisville. In december, they had the 2.2lb Maina Gran Panettone for $6. I checked back just to see if they were on sale, and they were - 50% off. But here's the thing - I go to the check-out and scan it, and its not $3, its $1.50! This is the very same panettone that Amazon 'gourmet' sells for $15! The box has an expiration date sometine in June, so I bought 4 of them. Of course I will give some away as gifts. Maybe. 

Looks like my new year's diet might have to wait!

Try making bread pudding with the panettone. It is wonderful.

I bought six panettonne at CookWorks in Dallas -- on sale, too. I'm making bread pudding with a rum sauce tonight for about a dozen people tomorrow. I tried a sample of this panettone made into bread pudding in the store over the holidays and it made a seriously good dessert.

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Seems odd that noone noticed this. Real quality panettone in italy is made with sourdough, which is the only way to get that special flavor, and the reason it last for WEEKS in a plastic bag. In fact, in italy the bakers tell people not to eat them for about 10 days after they are baked, this allows the flavor to develop, and the panettone remains moist.

I see in BBA Reinhardt uses both a sourdough starter and and normal yeast. I havn't tried his recipe, but the trials i've done i also have been unable to achieve the fluffy soft wide open texture that you get from purchased ones.

Oh, another KEY fact is that the panettone MUST be dried upside down. When you take it out of hte oven, you're supposed to skewer the paper molds with 2 long needles and hang it upside down. I thikn this helps with the texture.

jason

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Seems odd that noone noticed this. Real quality panettone in italy is made with sourdough, which is the only way to get that special flavor, and the reason it last for WEEKS in a plastic bag. In fact, in italy the bakers tell people not to eat them for about 10 days after they are baked, this allows the flavor to develop, and the panettone remains moist.

I see in BBA Reinhardt uses both a sourdough starter and and normal yeast. I havn't tried his recipe, but the trials i've done i also have been unable to achieve the fluffy soft wide open texture that you get from purchased ones.

Oh, another KEY fact is that the panettone MUST be dried upside down. When you take it out of hte oven, you're supposed to skewer the paper molds with 2 long needles and hang it upside down. I thikn this helps with the texture.

jason

See also the panettone in Carol Field's "The Italian Baker". It is a very good recipe. Woods

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When you take it out of the oven, you're supposed to skewer the paper molds with 2 long needles and hang it upside down.

Knitting needles... or what kind? That sounds so interesting. I've really enjoyed reading this thread. I'm going to start now and make panettone every month, and maybe by next Christmas I'll have it perfected! :biggrin:

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I made the Malglieri recipe the other day, and it is pretty tasty. I used whiskey-soaked raisins and dried cranberries, and orange zest instead of lemon. The aroma of the fruit, zest, and vanilla is rather lovely. Without a proper pan, I resorted to using a large Ketchup can lined with parchment (was a bit wary that the red and white painted surface was going to give off toxic fumes while in the oven!). :shock:

gallery_8338_183_167768.jpg

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Lannie it looks beautiful. I love the aroma that fills the house when I make panettone.

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Nigel Slater's toasted chocolate panettone sandwich is one of my favorite uses for pannetone. It's basically a grilled sandwich of thinly sliced, toasted panettone and melted dark chocolate. I spread lots of cultured sweet butter on the panettone after toasting and before grilling, and I sprinkle sea salt on the chocolate before sandwiching it all together. My best friend goes one step further and drapes slices of Emmental over the chocolate before pressing the sandwich back together and grilling it.


Edited by Verjuice (log)

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I used panettone last weekend to make bread pudding, as someone suggested earlier. It was a huge success and I loved it. I would love to hear other uses. I'm excited to try the toasted chocolate sandwich.

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Swisskaese - Thanks for the kind words! It was your and Patrick S' photos and tips that made me want to attempt to make a panettone.

Verjuice - I made the toasted sandwich with the melted chocolate and sprinkle of sea salt, and YUM! :biggrin:

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Lannie, if you come up with any interesting variations or ideas on the toasted sandwich, do let me know. I am forever experimenting with various additions, but I have yet to find one that compares to the original. I use Valrhona chocolate, usually between 50 and 60%, slice it thin, sandwich it between the toasted, buttered panettone, and grill. The last time I made it I added the merest smear of dulce de leche to the toast before adding the chocolate and it was very good. A tiny amount of bitter orange marmalade might be an interesting addition to the chocolate. Or perhaps stem ginger in syrup. Or a grilled Nutella panettone sandwich, if you go for that sort of thing (I have my moments). One of these days I'm going to grill one with just sweet melting cheese, like the kind used in Middle Eastern desserts like kunafa. I'm really looking forward to that.

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I slice it crosswise into rounds, about 3/4 inch thick, toast lightly in the oven, brush with butter then spread with lemon curd, add a layer, spread with more lemon curd, finish with the top round au naturale - then drizzle with a lemon syrup glaze, sometimes mixing lemon and ginger syrup together to make the glaze.

I stick long thin bamboo skewers from top to bottom about 1 1/2 to 2 inches in from the outside, in the center of which will be a wedge slice, then chill.

I cut the cake with the skewers in place, arrange the slices on plates then carefully remove the skewers. This keeps the layers in place while moving it.

I then very lightly dust with XXX sugar. Looks very pretty and tastes wonderful.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I had made a multilayer cake for a party I was working for one of my clients when I was a personal chef.

While removing it from the fridge, one of my helpers bumped the fridge door and the cake was upended onto my shoes.

I had nothing to back it up, but fortunately the job wasn't too far from home (I still lived down in the Valley then, so I nipped off to my house, found a panettone in the pantry and I always have a few quarts of my homemade lemon curd on hand, as well as various syrups from candying ginger and citrus peel, etc.

I simply hauled it back to the job, put it together and stuck it in the freezer to "set" for about 30 - 40 minutes, nailed it with the skewers and cut it crosswise then crosswise again and split each quarter so it ended up in 8 wedges, (my client had 6 guests) and it worked so well and got such raves that I kept it in my repetoir. As far as I know, no one else has ever done it and I am posting it here for the first time.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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That's an inspiring story. Thanks for sharing. The recipe looked to me like it had an interesting history, and it's true. Now I know what I'm making for my sister's birthday on Thursday! Great.


Edited by Verjuice (log)

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Congrats, lannie. Your panettone looks good.

The other day we opened a box of Maina panettone weve hand since december. It still tastes almost as fresh as it did in december. How is that possible? How can a bread still taste so fresh months after it was made?


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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This is a call to all experienced bakers....HELP!

I just aquired a family recipe that was written by my great-grandmother. I'm not an experienced baker so I was hoping someone could expand this for me to have it make sense:

1 qt scalded milk- cooled

3 packs yeast

2 c sugar

1/2 c melted butter

2 beaten eggs

3 t salt

1 1/2 t cardamom

5 lbs flour

2 c candied fruit, raisins, nuts, dates

Work like bread. 375 reduce to 325 bake 40 minutes. Add furit after dough rises once. Makes 5 loaves.

Questions:

What is the order of processes here? Do I do the first grouping of ingredients together first, then the second grouping (through flour) and then mix those two groups together to form the bread dough? I assume the oven temp change is to assure a hot start, why would this be? Also, no mention of proofing. My guess is that the cold proofing that is mentioned earlier in this string would be something to try. Also, it looks like there are supposed to be 2 proofing on this, once without the fruit and once with. How long would the first proof be? Is this usually to double the dough?

Any help at all on this would be greatly appreciated. I remember my father loved his grandmother's pannetone and I would love to test the recipe some this year to surprise him with it by Christmas.

Thanks everyone!

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Hi All,

I want to make a few for the Holidays but I can't seem to find the molds. Also anyone have a good recipe for plain Panettone? My wife doesn't like the fruit. I'll assume I can use any recipe and omit the fruit?

Thanks,

Joe

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Hi All,

I want to make a few for the Holidays but I can't seem to find the molds. Also anyone have a good recipe for plain Panettone? My wife doesn't like the fruit. I'll assume I can use any recipe and omit the fruit?

Thanks,

Joe

Panettone without fruit? :unsure:

I love panettone. I tried last year to make it at home. It was all good, but none of the recipes I tried were as good as the ones I buy at the store. You can read about some of our experiences here. Good luck and let us know how yours comes out!


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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