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jackal10

Panettone

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Not sure if this is the right place for this thread...

I've just received a copy of Edda Servi Machlin's "Classic Dolci of the Italian Jews", (ISBN 1-878857-12-6) and I'm blown away. Its the third volume of her "Classic Cuisine of the Italian Jews".

click for pix

Lots of recipes new to me, in the Italian biscuit tradition, with chestnuts, almonds and often flavoured with anise.

Its where my Pannetone recipe will come from this year. I usually use Cresci, but this seems a simpler and more direct recipe.


Edited by jackal10 (log)

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Can you talk about how it's different? I usually use Nick Malgieri's recipe. I'm excited about this year's because I candied a bunch of bergamot peel in addition to the orange and lemon. I've been hoarding them all year (in the fridge).

regards,

trillium

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Can you talk about how it's different?  I usually use Nick Malgieri's recipe.  I'm excited about this year's because I candied a bunch of bergamot peel in addition to the orange and lemon.  I've been hoarding them all year (in the fridge).

regards,

trillium

I always use Carol Field's recipe but am open minded. How does it differ? I candied a bunch of fruit too and am thinking its about time for pannetone.

Woods

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I always think of pannetone as a Christmas dessert. How does it fit in to the Jewish culinary experience?


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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This is the cuisine of Italian Jews. There is nothing inherent in a Pannetoine recipe or tradition that makes it not kosher; much, if not all "jewish" food is an adaptation or direct import from the host community. For example I have always thought of Gefillte Fish as a version of quenelle de brochet.

My summaries of the recipes:



"Modern" Pannetone    
Adapted from "Cresci" The Art of Leavened Dough    
Iginio Massari  and Avhille Zoia    
 Original   Bakers % 10% oz
First Dough  grams  grams
Starter or Sponge  1000 18.18% 100 3.5
Flour  4000 72.73% 400 14.1
Sugar  1250 22.73% 125 4.4
Butter  1450 26.36% 145 5.1
Water  1300 23.64% 130 4.6
Egg Yolk  1400 25.45% 140 4.9
Mix until smooth: proove until tripled (10-12 hours)    
   
Second Dough: all the first dough plus    
Flour  1000 18.18% 100 3.5
Egg Yolk  1300 23.64% 130 4.6
Sugar  1000 18.18% 100 3.5
Honey  250 4.55% 25 0.9
Butter  1550 28.18% 155 5.5
Salt  80 1.45% 8 0.3
Water  700 12.73% 70 2.5
Sultanas  2000 36.36% 200 7.0
Canidied peel  2300 41.82% 230 8.1
  0.00% 0 0.0
Total  20580 374.18% 2058 72.5
Flour weight  5500 100.00% 550 19.4
Hydration                                  2000 36.36%


Machlin

Flour  562.5 100.00%
Water  177.75 31.60%
Sugar  150 26.67%
Salt  6 1.07%
Butter  250 44.44%
Eggs 5 300 53.33%
Raisins  200 35.56%
Peel  100 17.78%
Vanilla  10 1.78%
Yeast                        10


Cresci is essentially a 3-stage dough; Machlin 2 stage, but then puts the dough in a cold oven.

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I bet you'll get a nice buttery sweet dough from the Machlin recipe but not the potential for a lighter more airy crumb which comes from building your Panettone in stages as with Cresci.

What's with the cold oven??? How does that work?

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This recipe does sound like it would work quite well. I also am intrigued by the cookbook and the other recipes you mention.

I bake quite a lot of pannetone because my friends love it not only on its own but also as the base in an exquisite (and very rich) bread pudding I make for Christmas Eve.

I too have used Nick Malgiere's recipe for the past few years for some of my loaves. I alternate with a recipe given me by my boss's mother (Italian, of course) which is very, very rich and has a very long list of ingredients and is also the kind that starts with a sponge and has additions added to the sponge over a period of two days.

I have never put this recipe into the computer, it is still on the yellow 5 x 7 file card Carmella wrote it on back in the mid 70s.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Jackal, The book sounds/looks great. Are the recipes in the weight/percentage format such as Cresci or are they volumetric. Is there any cultural, historical, annecdotal perspective?

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The book is not a professional book, so the orginal recipe is in volumetric (US) measurements. I did the conversion,

Cresci is in grams for professional size batches - 20Kg dough weight. Again, I di the conversion for the above tables, and usually make 2 x 1Kg loaves for my own consumption.

There is very little anecdote in this book just the occasional comment.- most of the andecdote in in Classic Cuisine Volume 1,

I've never seen the technique of putting the dough in a cold oven before and then rasiing it to 400F. I guess its a sort of longer, warm proof.

Andiesenji: I'd love to see your recipe...

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And Andie, I'd love to have the Christmas Eve bread pudding.

And may I add, I think you're just amazing!


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Extra Rich Bread Pudding for Christmas Eve

8 extra large eggs

4 extra large egg yolks

3 cups milk

1 cup heavy cream

2/3 cup sugar (or use all or part Splenda to cut sugar, it works just fine)

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract.

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon, freshly ground

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg, freshly ground

6 cups pannetone cut into 2 - inch cubes or torn roughly into the same size.

spread on sheet pan and allow to dry slightly for about 3 hours.

Spray a large 10 - 12 cup Bundt pan with oil, dust lightly with flour or use the new "Baker's" oil spray that contains flour.

Combine eggs, egg yolks, milk and cream, sugar or Splenda, vanilla, salt and spices in a large bowl.

Beat until eggs are completely blended and the mixture is slightly frothy.

Add the pannetone cubes and press down into the egg mixture with a spatula. Cover and set aside for about 20 to 30 minutes until the bread has soaked up most of the egg mixture.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Pour the mixture into the pan to within 1/2 inch of the top.

Set the pan into another baking pan and place in the oven.

Pour boiling water into the outer pan till it is within an inch of the top of the Bundt pan.

Bake for 75 minutes. However start testing, as below, at one hour. Your oven may bake more rapidly.

Test by inserting a thin knife blade into the pudding near the center.

If it comes out wet continue baking for an additional 10 minutes. Test again until knife blade comes out clean.

(It will take longer to bake in humid weather.)

Remove from oven and immediately brush top with melted butter.

Serve with warmed sweetened cream in which you have infused a cinnamon stick and stirred in some brandy or a sweet cream sherry, such as Savory & James.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Sorry to be a little thick-headed but what does this mean:

Flour 4000 72.73% 400 14.1

Is this it?

4000grs is by weight

72.73% is baker's percentage (i though flour is always 100%)

400 is ????

14.1oz is by weight (ounces)

Elie


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Sorry to be a little thick-headed but what does this mean:

Flour  4000 72.73% 400 14.1

Is this it?

4000grs is by weight

72.73% is baker's percentage (i though flour is always 100%)

400 is  ????

14.1oz is  by weight (ounces)

Elie

Yes. exactly, copied form my spreadsheet. The tabulation gets a little mixed up.I can email you the original if you need.

The first column is the origianl recipe.

The second bakers percentage,

The third column is 10% of the first, which is what I use at home.

The fourth column is that in imperial measure (oz)

The total flour is 100%, about 72% in the first dough, about 10% in the sponge and 18% added in the second stage

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i am making this for the chicago market. ask for it at your local trader joe's.

100% sourdough (72 hour process)

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the extra rich christmas bread pudding just got added to my christmas day menu.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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This year, one of the markets I shop at had rows and rows of mass-produced panettone. I had never tried this before, but I picked one up anyway. Well, it turned out to be just awesome: soft, moist, and extremely flavorful. I had visions of panettone french toast, panettone pudding, etc., but the bread didn't last long enough for any of that. My wife and I scarfed it down in two days.

So, now I want to make panettone at home. I have a recipe from Sherry Yard's The Art of Baking that looks good. I'm a neophyte when it comes to bread, but the recipe looks pretty do-able.

Does anyone have any general advice for the budding panettone baker? I'm interested in, for instance, what is the best way to prepare the fruit? Soak in rum? Rum plus white wine? Cognac? Do you need a paper mold to get a cupola-shaped panettone? And of course, does anyone have a recipe that they think is the best?

Thanks so much,

Patrick


Edited by Patrick S (log)

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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My wife is the Panatone maker in the family, but I can add a little. This year she used the paper molds, and will never go back to the metal molds. She soaks her fruit in Grappa.

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Hello!

I haven't made Panettone yet myself (soon!), but there's a nice looking recipe in Martha Stewart's Christmas cookbook. Her recipes generally seem to be good ones.

Also, you mentioned panetone french toast. Well, I was a panetone neophyte like you before this holiday season, but as I was planning my many menus for Christmas eve, Christmas day, etc., I decided to buy one of those darn packages of panetone and try my hand at some french toast using it. Let me just say that it was FABULOUS! I used the recipe from Everyday Italian on FoodTV, but really, you just need the usual egg-milk-sugar base and a yummy syrup (I made some with brown sugar, water and heavy cream - oh, and cinnamon).

Anyway, this will be our Christmas morning breakfast from now on :)

Let us know how your Panetone baking experiments go. I'm eager to see if it's do-able for a fairly new bread baker, or something that should be left to the pros.

:)


Bryan Ochalla, a.k.a. "Techno Foodie"

http://technofoodie.blogspot.com/

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people."

Orson Welles (1915 - 1985)

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Well, I've made my first panettone. I used Yard's recipe, which includes candied orange peel and golden raisins (plus 1/4C lemon zest mixed into the dough). Yard says to soak the fruit for 24hrs in either white wine+rum, or cognac, plus a vanilla bean. I used cognac with a little amaretto, and a tablespoon of vanilla paste. There is an additional 1/4C amaretto in the dough.

Yard gives a simple suggestion for a panettone mold: a parchment-lined coffee can. I didn't have one handy, so I used a 10" springform.

The smell of the panettone while cooking was awesome: bread and citrus and amaretto.

I tried one small slice last night as it was cooling, and it was very good. A little denser and not quite as sweet as the one I bought, but just as delicious overall. I look forward to working with this recipe more, tweaking it, and improving its appearance.

gallery_23736_355_1104328867.jpg

gallery_23736_355_1104328893.jpg

gallery_23736_355_1104328932.jpg

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"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Well, I've made my first panettone. I used Yard's recipe, which includes candied orange peel and golden raisins (plus 1/4C lemon zest mixed into the dough). Yard says to soak the fruit for 24hrs in either white wine+rum, or cognac, plus a vanilla bean. I used cognac with a little amaretto, and a tablespoon of vanilla paste. There is an additional 1/4C amaretto in the dough.

Yard gives a simple suggestion for a panettone mold: a parchment-lined coffee can. I didn't have one handy, so I used a 10" springform. 

The smell of the panettone while cooking was awesome: bread and citrus and amaretto.

I tried one small slice last night as it was cooling, and it was very good. A little denser and not quite as sweet as the one I bought, but just as delicious overall.  I look forward to working with this recipe more, tweaking it, and improving its appearance.

Man, talk about two people getting two totally different results from the same recipe. Patrick, yours' is gorgeous!

I used Sherry's recipe too yesterday and also used a 10" springform. My finished panettone, however, does not look anything like yours. :sad: Although what I ended up with is a good looking loaf of bread, it definitely has six distinctive sections. Did you not form the dough into six individual balls as she instructs? Then again, maybe I formed mine just a little tooooooo tightly.

This also is my first taste experience with panettone. Other than the drunken raisins, this is pretty taste-less stuff... certainly not enough flavor to encourage me to make it again.

Overall, this was a fun learning experience as I'd never before made a yeast bread outside of Mr. Bread Machine.

Di

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Although what I ended up with is a good looking loaf of bread, it definitely has six distinctive sections.  Did you not form the dough into six individual balls as she instructs?  Then again, maybe I formed mine just a little tooooooo tightly.

No, I didn't break the dough into 6 balls before I put it in the pan. I just couldn't see the rationale, so this was one of those times when I crossed my fingers, deviated from the recipe, and hoped for the best. Given your experience, it doesn't seem to have done any harm.

Maybe we have different tastes, but the one I made isnt tasteless at all. Next time I will use a bit more sugar, more fruit, and more zest, but I like where I'm starting from.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Another thing, and I don't know how or if it matters much, is that I left my dough quite sticky before I baked it. Beyond the first 3.5 cups, I used maybe another 1/4cup of flour.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Hello!

I haven't made Panettone yet myself (soon!), but there's a nice looking recipe in Martha Stewart's Christmas cookbook.  Her recipes generally seem to be good ones.

Also, you mentioned panetone french toast.  Well, I was a panetone neophyte like you before this holiday season, but as I was planning my many menus for Christmas eve, Christmas day, etc., I decided to buy one of those darn packages of panetone and try my hand at some french toast using it.  Let me just say that it was FABULOUS!  I used the recipe from Everyday Italian on FoodTV, but really, you just need the usual egg-milk-sugar base and a yummy syrup (I made some with brown sugar, water and heavy cream - oh, and cinnamon).

Anyway, this will be our Christmas morning breakfast from now on :)

Now I'm practically drooling! I'll let you know how my french toast works out.


Edited by Patrick S (log)

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I actually just soak my raisins in hot water.


"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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