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Japanese Kitchen Gadgets & Equipment


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Wow! the ones on that second page are really expensive, even for Japan!

I have an all metal sausage maker/grinder that I am pretty sure I saw for about 4000 yen somewhere in Japan (after I paid $40 and lugged it back from the US).

Does it have to be a meat grinder? Is this something that could be done in a blender of food processor? Both of which are more expensive of course, but can also be used for many other applications.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Wow! the ones on that second page are really expensive, even for Japan!

I have an all metal sausage maker/grinder that I am pretty sure I saw for about 4000 yen somewhere in Japan (after I paid $40 and lugged it back from the US).

Does it have to be a meat grinder? Is this something that could be done in a blender of food processor? Both of which are more expensive of course, but can also be used for many other applications.

This is the cheapest one I found. It looks like it's kind of light-weight, though (is it possible that it's aluminum or some other light-weight metal rather than cast iron?). I might try it, anyway. I just hate buying things like that on the internet, because I really want to fiddle with it before buying.

It could probably be done in a food processor, but I think with a food processor the texture will be quite different. The dried fruits will get too sticky, and the nuts won't get chopped evenly, so the final product will be more pasty than I want. I actually have a food processor (a Cuisinart which I sent from the US--one of the most useful but also heaviest items I have brought to Japan), so it won't be a hardship to try using it, but andiesenji uses a meat grinder, and I want my fruit and nut balls to be like hers! They're perfect! :wub:

Andiesenji's fruit and balls

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材質:本体・ローラー・キャップ:鋳鉄(錫めっき)、ハンドル:鋳鉄(錫めっき)

It says it is tin plated cast iron (the main body, roller, cap and handle)

Mine is a different brand but looks almost exactly the same and it also tin plated cast iron.

I can vouch for Captain Stag products as well, we have a lot of them. :biggrin: They are a wonderful (and cheap) brand for camping/outdoor products. We have their dutch oven and it cost a 1/3 to a 1/4 of what other brands do and is great quality, we use it every time we go camping and often for BBQ's in our backyard.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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材質:本体・ローラー・キャップ:鋳鉄(錫めっき)、ハンドル:鋳鉄(錫めっき)

It says it is tin plated cast iron (the main body, roller, cap and handle)

Mine is a different brand but looks almost exactly the same and it also tin plated cast iron.

I can vouch for Captain Stag products as well, we have a lot of them.  :biggrin: They are a wonderful (and cheap) brand for camping/outdoor products. We have their dutch oven and it cost a 1/3 to a 1/4 of what other brands do and is great quality, we use it every time we go camping and often for BBQ's in our backyard.

OK, you've talked me into it. I just finished ordering it, and expect delivery in two weeks! I hope andiesenji does a photo tutorial before then (hint hint, if you're reading).

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In this video for a fire extinguisher, we see a very nice compact 2-burner gas stove with steel back-splash/flame guard + wall vent

http://smt.blogs.com/mari_diary/2008/08/funny-items-on.html

Who are the best stove-makers in Japan and what might be the cost of such a unit?

Most "apartment sized" US units are small with 4-burner construction whose dimensions and conception are non-functional for my needs. I wonder if such smaller size Japanese stoves are available in the USA? The one i saw seemed to have one strong-burning wok ring and one other burner, ideal for my purposes.

TIA.

gautam

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H-san,

Thanks for your amazing forbearance, ksanti, in the face of zany queries! May I ask if the price you suggested include the steel backsplash/flameguard +airvent or does it include only the cooktop?

If it is not too personal a question, since you had your house built to your specifications, what style/type of cooktop did you prefer? I am actually very interested in the steel flame guard and vent, as much as the cook top. I remember seeing your fish grill when you showed us your kitchen. That or an oven is not so much of a priority but would be quite nice.

The safety feature of the steel fireguard impressed me very much as it is a feature not available for ordinary domestic cooktops in the USA, certainly not for the small-sized ones. I am interested in Structural Insulated Panel [sIPS] residential construction. These have a flammable threshold of 165 Celsius, their only weak point amidst many virtues. You can see why I might be drawn to the Japanese models. Amazing stuff. US$600-800 approximately, for the best quality, you say. How much more for the steel guard and vent?

Thank you very much.

gautam

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  • 1 month later...

Before I go out and purchase one, how do you use a tsukemonoki? Do you press down on the vegetables, and then drain the water out as it's released from the vegetables? How do you drain the water out?

I'm thinking of getting one not for tsukemono, but for draining paneer. Think it will work?

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I use mine to drain tofu before I fry it. I'm not sure how it's supposed to work exactly, but I just tip the water out the top as I go. I usually put whatever I want in when I first go into the kitchen, and then as I work on other projects, I just tip the water out. If the pressure's strong enough, there shouldn't be much danger of it leaking back in. I've left stuff in for several hours without any problems.

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I use mine to drain tofu before I fry it. I'm not sure how it's supposed to work exactly, but I just tip the water out the top as I go. I usually put whatever I want in when I first go into the kitchen, and then as I work on other projects, I just tip the water out. If the pressure's strong enough, there shouldn't be much danger of it leaking back in. I've left stuff in for several hours without any problems.

Does the tofu keep stable when you tip out the water? I'm worried about breakage. Paneer, like tofu, can be very delicate.

I'm looking at getting this one. It's cheap! But 3L might be a bit too big for what I need...

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I usually use momen tofu when I'm frying, and the weight of the panel keeps everything in place. But I got my tsukemono ki at the 100 yen shop! It's quite small, maybe 500 ml - it holds one block of tofu nicely, as it's rectangular.

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I have one (ahem, or two) of those.

The screw down type may be hard to find, but it's more adjustable. The springloaded type (which is usually ALSO adjustable with a screw) can be a bit strong for things like yogurt cheese or tofu, unless you treat it kindly.

Yogurt cheese: I wrap this in gauze, allow it to drain naturally for a while, and only press it in a pickle-maker if I want it really firm.

Tofu: for some dishes, it doesn't really matter if it breaks up. Otherwise, you just have to use a strip of gauze or something to prevent the tofu from sticking to the "presser" under pressure.

To drain: very low tech, just uncliip and hold over the sink, artfully holding the presser in place as the liquid drains off.

The small rectangular cheapo ones are my favorite. The blogger in the link apparently bought one for 315 yen at Daiso (supposed to be a 100 yen shop).

You may have to cut a block of tofu in half and put the pieces beside each other to fit them in, but this type of pickle-maker is so simple in construction (not adjustable) that it's very easy to wash.

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Dear Prasantrin,

Sorry to chip in a bit offtopic, but like different types of tofu, the hardness and indeed, rubberiness [and therefore yuckiness of the cooked dish of paneer] will have a lot to do with how you press it, but also what milk you use, what acid and what temperature [similar parameters apply to tofu as well.

The best paneer for COOKING, that will accept moderate compression and still retain tenderness should have high milkfat, 7-10% and high solids-not-fat 13%. That is why, good cooking paneer is made with buffalo milk, and this is compressed to a fair degree.

However, chhana, or jol chhana, made with cow milk with butterfat 5-6% and SNF 11%, curdled with soured whey or buttermilk, at 80-90C, will yield a different product. This too can be compressed, but not hard compression, and exceptional cubes are made from these, as in savory dishes. Many iconic sweets of Bengal are made from the warm loose stage of this chhana, never from the higher fat buffalo milk.

When curdled with stronger acid like citric acid or lemon juice, plus higher temperatures like a simmer or boil, care must be taken with the compression and the fat content, otherwise you will end up with a disagreeable, chewy, squeaky, dry product when finally cooked in gravy.

A very, very little compression, both a regards time and pressure, goes a long way with both paneer and chhana.

How to increase fat and SNF? Add half & half, if available in Japan. Non-homogenized milk, the freshest you can get, will give you the best texture and flavor. Don't discard the whey. Either use it for the savory dish you might be cooking, save a portion and sour it [carefully] for the next batch of curdling and use the rest to bake bread, cornbread or Southern style beaten biscuits, even Irish soda bread.

Happy cooking.

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  • 2 weeks later...

i just saw iron chef Sakai tear a carrot to one long beautiful uniformly thick shred using a strange kitchen contraption i haven't seen before. it was equipped with a lever and that's all i saw. help? amazon linky linky?

thanks in advance

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It's not a mandolin, I think, but something like this thing. Awfully expensive, but would be fun to use.

The Japanese Benriner website shows the one at Ming's Pantry, and another type called Cook Help. There are pictures of both types in use, and they seem to be identical in the final product.

Edited by prasantrin (log)
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I think that you mean this vegetable turner shredder, actually. Made by Benriner but not a "Benriner" -- aka a Japanese mandoline. Michel Richard uses them a lot in Happy in the Kitchen.

And the inevitable Chinese knock-off, at 1/2 the price...

http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/21056179...ING_SLICER.html

It's actually not a bad unit; cheap enough that I'm tempted to get one...

Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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Hi,

I need some advice and ideas on how to use a Japanese gadet(use for making sushi) to prepare a , "Mille- Feuille of vegetable here is the link:http://www.floconsdesel.com/galeriefds01plat01.htm.

The gadget that I am talking about(picture is attached. Hope I am successful in uploading the picture) Hope you tell me the name of this gadget.

C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\NEMO\Desktop\IMG_3034.jpg

主泡一杯邀西方. 馥郁幽香而湧.三焦回转沁心房

"Inhale the aroma before tasting and drinking, savour the goodness from the heart "

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