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WOW-2002 Peter Lehmann Shiraz Barossa


geo t.
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Carolyn Tillie tagged me Cupbearer, so I guess I'm it. Took me a while to come up with something; I looked at some French wine alternatives, then thought it might me fun to taste this, based on a recent positive experience of the '01 model and the fact that it's probably fairly widely available. (This selection's appearance on the latest Wine Spectator Top 100 list had nothing to do with my choice, since I don't necessarily believe that "distinction" should be held against any wine; innocent until proven guilty, sez I!) We don't do a lot of Shiraz at our house, so we'll see what happens. We'll probably pair it with some kind of lamb dish, maybe even lamb burgers, since we love to grill out in the dead of winter. :blink:

Cheers from chilly Day-twah,

geo

George Heritier aka geo t.

The Gang of Pour

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This invite was an excuse to pair wine up with our Xmas Eve dinner - Roti Duck l'orange, gratin dauphinois & haricot verts. Tho' I am a newbie to describing a wine (certainly not drinking them), I read WOW notes and hope to contribute.

I was struck by how well balanced this wine nosed and drank. Not overly fruity or tannic, the libation was a perfect compliment to the duck and stood up well to cheese course that followed. We undoubtedly buy again but also believe this would benefit from cellering.

Great presentation, as well; luv the foil design - thanks for the suggestion!

~waves

"When you look at the face of the bear, you see the monumental indifference of nature. . . . You see a half-disguised interest in just one thing: food."

Werner Herzog; NPR interview about his documentary "Grizzly Man"...

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I was struck by how well balanced this wine nosed...

What an unusual figure of speech! I kind of like it as it eliminates the more negative connotations of "smelled." I'd never heard it before but it makes so much sense.

Just curious whether this anthimeria (I had to do a little research to find out the term for the substitution of one part of speech for another) is commonplace or should all credit be given to waves2ya?

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2002 Peter Lehmann Shiraz Barossa, $19.99 US, 14% alc.: Deep dark garnet in color, with a tight nose of blackberry, black cherry and dark plum that echoes and expands on the palate with added hints of tar and chocolate. This is no over-oaked, Aussie ooze monster; the deep dark fruit only hints at a candied, overripe character, and the tannins really need at least a few years to tone down for optimum drinking. Still, it’s a decent match for a pan seared pork steak and scalloped spuds, and good drinking by its lonesome too. Kim really likes this, which explains why there was less than half the bottle left for me to try when I got home tonight! Solid stuff, this.

Reporting from Day-twah,

geo t.

George Heritier aka geo t.

The Gang of Pour

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2002 Peter Lehmann Shiraz Barossa, $16.99 AUS, 14% alc

Similar tasting note to geo. From an excellent year down here Peter Lehmann has produced a beautifully balanced red that is just so drinkable. Lots of xmas pudding, spicy blackberry notes and thankfully the american oak is kept in check and actually complements and provides some structure to the wine. Nice acid and quite a long finish - not the greatest complexity, but heh it's hardly that expensive.

Cheers

Paul

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I was finally able to locate a bottle over the weekend and tried it with grilled lamb chops last night.

It had a great concentrated fruit smell but I also got a hint of something fresh like rosemary. On its own, I thought it had a bright fruit taste with a hot almost chemical finish (alcohol?). Once we got dinner on the table and I was able to try it with food, it tasted much earthier much more like black cherry.

I have another bottle and am looking forward to trying it again.

Practice Random Acts of Toasting

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Cool. An Aussie wine second up. I haven't touched a Lehman wine in ages. Will pop out to the local bottle shop for one tomorrow and will report in earnest.

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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Okay so I broke my streak of pureness tonight and tried this wine. Since Christmas day it's been the gym, the driving range and nothing but healthy fare and no booze, except for a beer at a Japanese place on Boxing Day (the day after Christmas).

Deep purple, with a red edge, Coffee, Peppper, Cedar, very silky. Nice acidity in the mouth. Longish finish. Very nice. If I was an expert on Aussie wine or a poseur, I would say very Barossa. I would certainly try this wine again to see if it's actually this good or if it's because of my temperance that clouded my judgement.

Bonus note, Santa Julia Tardio 2003, light gold, intense apple and pear with honey on the nose, sweet but acidic in the mouth. This is delicious. Like a still Moscato.

Strange bottle! Good wine (the shiraz).

Edited by Coop (log)

David Cooper

"I'm no friggin genius". Rob Dibble

http://www.starlinebyirion.com/

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This is what I wished I had said:

"This is all-Barossa and a fine example of what the South Australian valley means to shiraz. The nose is super ripe and awash in plummy blackcurrant fruit. You taste the vanilla/oak, and just a hint of mocha together with plenty of spicy, briary fruity undertones. The finish is typical Oz with that shot of acidity to keep it lively in the back of the throat. You can drink or hold this one over the next three to five years."

But I didn't! Thank You AG.

David Cooper

"I'm no friggin genius". Rob Dibble

http://www.starlinebyirion.com/

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Finally got round to picking up a bottle. AUD$16.99.

Did what I consider to be several tastings, nothing fancy, but I tend to pour a wine as soon as I open it, just to check for, ahem... musty grandma's socks. Then I'd rest it for a while before plunging in with great gusto....<hic>

Nose #1: Bright currants, ripe but still edgy. No hint of the expected hit of petroleum, typical of B I G Aussie reds, but still on the large side.

Palate #1: A good Aussie table wine, soft at first then stringy tannins kick in, leading into succulent spice, cinnamon, warming and balanced with acid at the end.

THen food, which tonight was Penne Aglia Oglio, Italian canned tuna with a rocket/red onion/mesclun balsamic dressed salad, and baked balsamic garlic free-range organic no fuck-a-around chicken drumsticks.

Smoothed out the lil'bastard to make it completely quaffable. Got one here as I type. The finish is more prominent after food, the ground pepper really showing off with some wood.

Nice and fun. Versatile I'd imagine, but still, for an Aussie palate, it's the equivalent of a good table wine, wouldn't drink it solo myself, but would happily bosh it with mates over a good food session. Will get more.

Hope your second bottle arrives, oh, Dear Rose!

Edited by PCL (log)

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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2002 Peter Lehmann Barossa Shiraz, 14% alc.

Finally, after all sorts of misadventures (the first bottle broke in shipping), my Wine of the Week has arrived!

My first impression is oak. Following aromas remind me of a pork tenderloin on the rotisserie with some herbs and a light brush of balsamic vinegar.

Sweet** cherry and plum flavors, and a definite sweetness** from oak that comes through in the flavor. Faint notes of licorice, but none of the bacon, roast beef, and clove flavors that I expect from a syrah. On the other hand, I'm writing up three wines tonight and so far this bottle has the lowest level (hic).

** I don't mean sweet in terms of sugar, but that kind of elusive sweetness that one gets from brandy or well prepared seafood. Our more experienced tasters will recognize this sensation, but for our newer members, I'd just like to share that some sensations of sweetness are not about sugar—they are more about a richness, or an elusive memory.

Lots of acid compared to the current fashion in California syrahs, which would bode well for longevity if the wine had more complexity, but the back label suggests 4 to 5 years, which I feel is about right.

After being open for an hour, the deeper shiraz flavors are starting to come through.

And the bottle level is getting lower.

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Mary Baker

Solid Communications

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Mary, can you please elaborate on the pork on the nose?

In my post I mentioned petroleum on the nose, but upon reflection, it could also be classified as licorice on the palate.

Did you have any food with it?

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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I love my significanto's pork on the rotisserie. The aroma in this wine is that sweet promise of juicy, pink, pork tenderloin. Some wines, particularly syrah/shiraz have a tease of 'roast beef' in the aroma--that elusive char/blood aroma. This wine's aroma is a little gentler, I think.

Ironically, I have just poured myself the last of the bottle, enjoying a quiet glass of red and some online time at 10 pm. It hasn't changed much at all since I first opened it.

Edited to add: I did not have the wine with food either time. The first time I tasted it before dinner, and this time I'm drinking it well after an evening of food and wine.

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Mary Baker

Solid Communications

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Mary, can you please elaborate on the pork on the nose?

In my post I mentioned petroleum on the nose, but upon reflection, it could also be classified as licorice on the palate.

Did you have any food with it?

PCL

I agree with your licorice descriptor. I often find it in Barossa shiraz but interesting never in McLaren Vale or Margaret River/Mt Barker. In a blind tasting of oz shiraz, the smell of licorice and my guess at Barossa, often than not makes me look a hero and super wine geek :biggrin:

Cheers

paul

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Funny that, because I'm almost always nearly blind AND in need of a feed after a tasting.

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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