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One more time on Kitchenaid mixers


polack
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Gosh, that looks really good and professional from what I can tell. I want to know more too!

A good cook is like a sorceress who dispenses happiness. – Elsa Schiaparelli, 1890-1973, Italian Designer

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Thanks for the positive comments! Here's what I did to paint the mixer. First, I removed the top black covers that hide the attachment ports. Then I carefully masked the rest of the parts that I did not want to paint. I used a red Scotch Brite pad (approximately 600 grit) to scuff up the factory finish. I wiped it off really good after scuffing with a damp no lint cloth (tack cloth) and let it dry thoroughly. I used spray paint (I think it was Rustoleum but it could have been just Lowe's store brand) and put on two thin coats. Then I used some spray polyurethane (satin finish) so the paint would stand up to my use and abuse. I actually sprayed the polyurethane a little dry, but it ended up looking like a commercial finish so I left it.

The hardest part to mask was the hole where the cord goes into the body. There is a little overspray there but I doubt anyone will notice. I did disassemble the scale to paint it. It was a freebie and quite rusty.

The finish is holding up very well on both pieces, and I did not use any poly on the scale. I did the painting about six months ago, so if it was going to flake off I believe it would have done so by now. I believe the key to any paint finish is surface prep. You want to make sure the surface isn't shiny and that there isn't any grease or dirt on it, but you don't want to have any deep scratches. I used a Scotch brite pad with a light hand, but you could use very fine sandpaper (I would say 1000 grit) instead. Scuff it in one direction (back and forth) as opposed to in circles, which will create visible swirl marks in the paint. (The same goes for waxing your car.)

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Here is a tip for painting appliances, given me by my appliance guy who is a wizard.

To keep overspray from affecting rubber gaskets, cords, etc., brush them with vaseline, using a flat, artist brush.

After the paint dries, wipe the vaseline off with a piece of gauze.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Here is a tip for painting appliances, given me by my appliance guy who is a wizard.

To keep overspray from affecting rubber gaskets, cords, etc., brush them with vaseline, using a flat, artist brush. 

After the paint dries, wipe the vaseline off with a piece of gauze.

Excellent tip. You can also use a Q-tip to remove the vaseline if the area is indented.

I didn't do that because I didn't have any vaseline in the house...plus I'm pretty clumsy and usually end up getting the vaseline somewhere it shouldn't be, and then the paint won't stick.

I bet you could also use shortening instead of vaseline.

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One more plug for the DeLonghi (Kenwood). Another feature that I feel is better than KA is that the speed control is infinite. I have trouble when I use my friend's KA because even the slowest speed is too fast for some applications, and there are times I would like a speed in between 2 and 3. With the DeLonghi you can achieve the precise speed you want (there is a minimum setting so you don't burn out the motor, but it is very slow).

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  • 1 month later...

Any opinions on a (Sears) Kenmore stand mixer? My mom is looking to buy her first stand mixer, and saw a KA advertised on sale at Sears. I think the KA motor is approx 325 w. Next to it was a Kenmore model, cheaper price, with approx 600 w motor. She came away empty handed but full of questions. I'd love to pass on any eGullet advice to her.

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I paid more for mine going on 15 years ago. If I remember right it was around $269.

Polack

Consider that when Hobart first instroduced the KA mixer back in 1915 or thereabouts, the original price was $189, more than a month's wage for many workers. Comparitively, today's machines are incredibly cheap.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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I have an ultra power that I got about 12yrs ago. I have no idea what the wattage is, but it has held up very well for me. I made some foccacia dough tonight and it had to knead for 10 min. I did have to hold onto it because it was jumpy, but it didnt get that hot.

When I shipped it here to Canada from California, it did break, but I took it to a certified KA repair place and it cost 25$ to fix it.

I too was thinking of getting a bigger model, but now Im not so sure.

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Any opinions on a (Sears) Kenmore stand mixer?  My mom is looking to buy her first stand mixer, and saw a KA advertised on sale at Sears.  I think the KA motor is approx 325 w.  Next to it was a Kenmore model, cheaper price, with approx 600 w motor.  She came away empty handed but full of questions.  I'd love to pass on any eGullet advice to her.

From what I understand is that kitchenaid was bought out by Sears. I don't know what the mixer looks like but if it's true she'll still have the same company. To add to the conversation, I was at a house sale a couple of weeks ago and the person running it showed me an N50 kithenaid made by Hobart, now that's a machine.

Polack

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Any opinions on a (Sears) Kenmore stand mixer?  My mom is looking to buy her first stand mixer, and saw a KA advertised on sale at Sears.  I think the KA motor is approx 325 w.  Next to it was a Kenmore model, cheaper price, with approx 600 w motor.  She came away empty handed but full of questions.  I'd love to pass on any eGullet advice to her.

From what I understand is that kitchenaid was bought out by Sears. I don't know what the mixer looks like but if it's true she'll still have the same company. To add to the conversation, I was at a house sale a couple of weeks ago and the person running it showed me an N50 kithenaid made by Hobart, now that's a machine.

Polack

I forgot to mention that he paid $50. for it. So there are deals to be had if you look long enough.

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  • 10 months later...

I'm pulling up an old thread, but I was wondering if anyone else has had any experience with the Kitchenaid Pro 6 mixer. I'm trying to decide on a standmixer right now, something that will definitely last a lifetime. I like the look of the Kitchenaid mixers the best, but I'm also considering the Delongi one. I'd like to pay no more than $600 Cdn, if possible. Thanks!

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i have the older 5qt model which i don't see around as much anymore. this is the one i've used in every restaurant that i've worked in. i love that one. i was home in the summer (i mailed it to my mom when i moved) and used it for about 5 batches of italian meringue buttercream back to back and it was fine after having been unused for about four years!

then, i bought a five-plus which is their 5qt with a wider bowl. i don't like it as much as my older regular 5qt. there's no way to adjust the height of the attachments, so the bottom and sides of the bowl never get any action. also, it is making strange sounds (after several batches of neil's marshmallows)...ticking in the motor kind of thing. it just doesn't seem as solidly built as my other mixer.

i haven't heard much about the 6qt model. seems big in my opinion...unless you always make double and triple batches of cake or cookie dough.

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I used to own the 4 1/2 quart and then got the 6 qt as a gift. Honestly, I preferred the smaller model with the narrower bowl, which I thought did a better job mixing the quantities I normally made. The only times I ran into trouble with the small one was in mixing some bread dough recipes where there was just too much dough for the mixer to handle. I would think carefully about what you intend to use it for and think about saving some money and going with a 5 qt.

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My 29 year old K45 is a 250 watt model. It has worked all these years and keeps right on going. It survived a four year detour to Mexico where it did double duty in a restaurant that I managed and survived the work and current fluctuations. I replaced the bowl base, the rubber feet and the beater. Wore the plastic coat right off. Its not the perfect machine - but I doubt that I will work for another 29 years.

So, buy what you like and hope you get lucky.

The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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The newest 6 qt model, the Pro 600, was in a Cook"s Illustrated Equipment test a month or two ago and was rated first, with the similarly priced 5 qt DeLonghi and the very expensive 5 qt Hobart second and third. Against a great number of other mixers. I do recall that they said that the Pro 600 handled small quantities as well as large. It's worth reading through that article, even though some of their conclusions would find disagreement here.

I think you can get the Pro 600 for about $370 - 400 US. Here's a Williams-Sonoma link for a look, although I realize you are in Canada.

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^Thanks for all the advice! I remember reading the article, and that's why I was interested in the Pro 6 and the Delongi mixer. I should note that I'm just a home baker, but I do bake quite often. I don't think I'll ever be in the restaurant industry, so I don't need huge batches of anything done. I would like to start making my own brioche this year, so that's one of the main reasons why I need a standmixer. I just figured that I would get the best that's out there right now, so there's very little chance of me ever becoming dissatisfied with the machine, or feeling that I've outgrown it. (I have another 50 years or more of baking to do, at least!! :wink: )

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...but I do bake quite often.

Now, that is an understatement! :laugh:

I crave a KA, as well, but in Japan the cheapest I've found is about Y82,000 (C$820-ish, US$700-ish) for the 225W, 4.3L model, and Y132000 (C$1320, US$1100) for a 250W, 4.8L one. A bit pricey for my pocketbook, and pleas to my employers to buy me one have fallen upon deaf ears (for some reason, they always think I'm joking...).

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I crave a KA, as well, but in Japan the cheapest I've found is about Y82,000 (C$820-ish, US$700-ish) for the 225W, 4.3L model, and Y132000 (C$1320, US$1100) for a 250W, 4.8L one.  A bit pricey for my pocketbook, and pleas to my employers to buy me one have fallen upon deaf ears (for some reason, they always think I'm joking...).

That doesn't surprise me, but couldn't you pick up one in Canada for ~CA$270+ taxes and run it off a voltage converter? A 300W step up converter is only US$30 or so and I'm sure you could purchase a similar model to the one below in Japan. Of course, this is assuming that you can bring it to Japan yourself.

http://www.international-electrical-suppli...panvoltage.html

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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A friend of mine lived in Nagoya for two years while studying with an artist. She was able to order some small appliances from Hong Kong for much less than the cost in Japan even with the import fees. I don't recall if a KA mixer was one of the items but I know she did get a heavy duty juicer that wasn't available anywhere in Japan.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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^Thanks for all the advice! I remember reading the article, and that's why I was interested in the Pro 6 and the Delongi mixer. I should note that I'm just a home baker, but I do bake quite often. I don't think I'll ever be in the restaurant industry, so I don't need huge batches of anything done. I would like to start making my own brioche this year, so that's one of the main reasons why I need a standmixer. I just figured that I would get the best that's out there right now, so there's very little chance of me ever becoming dissatisfied with the machine, or feeling that I've outgrown it. (I have another 50 years or more of baking to do, at least!!  :wink: )

Ling,

I'd like to add a few thoughts on KA vs. Delonghi. In my experience, KA provides excellent customer service, not that I've needed to use it much. My old K5A from the 1970s is a workhorse (the old units were manufactured by Hobart). When I needed to order a replacement paddle a few years ago (the enamel paint chipped off the old one after 20 years), I ordered it from the KA website and it arrived within a week. It's reassuring to know that parts are available for older models, repairs can be made, and customer service is responsive.

When KA introduced newer models a few years ago, there were complaints of poor workmanship and motors burning out. I believe they corrected the problem in recent models and the Pro 6 looks like a terrific machine.

The DeLonghi mixer also looks nice, but I've had "issues" with four DeLonghi appliances that I've purchased over the past two years (convection oven/rotisserie, toaster, coffee brewer and space heater). DeLonghi's customer service is not great. Their web is hard to navigate. They do not have many authorized service centers.

If you want your mixer to "last a lifetime" you need to consider the servicing aspect over the long term. In ten years, you don't want to be told that the model is "obsolete" and no longer "supported."

Good luck with whatever you decide to purchase, because we egulleters look forward to your daily posts and delectable desserts. :wub:

Ilene

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