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Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Seasons 1-5


Louisa Chu
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I don't know if this has been reported elsewhere on eGullet, but he's been nominated for an Emmy- the Beirut episode:

Bourdain nominated for Emmy

He deserves it. It was wonderful.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Can anyone identify the music from the Vietnam : Island of Mr. Sang episode, which comes on at the beginning?

You can see a clip with the music in the background here:

http://travel.discovery.com/beyond/player....tleId=155450380

It is strangely enchanting. I'd like to know where the music comes from and if i can get it.

thanks

Edited by jmolinari (log)
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I don't know if this has been reported elsewhere on eGullet, but he's been nominated for an Emmy- the Beirut episode:

Bourdain nominated for Emmy

He deserves it. It was wonderful.

100% agreed. I still think about that episode and what they experienced and witnessed others experiencing.

JMolinari, the link didn't work for me-- sorry!

Edited by LoriZig (log)

You say I am mysterious. Let me explain myself. In a land of oranges, I am faithful to apples. ~ Elsa Gidlow

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I am dying of curiosity about the Tibetan family with the yaks - is that really a fully-functional, Just Your Average Yakherder family? The house was spectacularly beautiful, and everyone was dressed really elaborately. This is probably more my general lack of familiarity with the culture, but it all seemed a little Come See Authentic Tibetan Life, Replete With Traditional Native Costumes, Only $40 A Pop to me, and I was hoping I was wrong.

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I say this every time a new season starts, but it seems like with each iteration the show becomes more and more food-centered, which I always enjoy.

Yes. I waited for months for a repeat of the TexMex show and was extremely disappointed. It was more like a poor man's Easy Rider - lots of shots of Tony either out walking along some road, or biking a deserted stretch of highway.

I was hoping to see him sample the Wild Horse Desert's famous cabrito, or maybe some bbq'd cow's head tacos.

Perhaps next time.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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  • 3 weeks later...
I am dying of curiosity about the Tibetan family with the yaks - is that really a fully-functional, Just Your Average Yakherder family?  The house was spectacularly beautiful, and everyone was dressed really elaborately.  This is probably more my general lack of familiarity with the culture, but it all seemed a little Come See Authentic Tibetan Life, Replete With Traditional Native Costumes, Only $40 A Pop to me, and I was hoping I was wrong.

Yes, Tibetans do traditionally dress like that - like a lot of other cultures, they were their entire material wealth on their clothing. But keep in mind that a lot of that elaborate jewelry is composed of turquoise, amber and some silver - they are not wearing 24K and diamonds. (I own a few Himalyan "earth and sky" muti-strand necklaces myself.) Their clothing, too, is primarily cotton and wool, and is what was known down South a few generations ago as "homespun." Again, we are not talking luxury fabrics here.

The homes, while possessing elaborately carved posts, lintels, etc. and beautiful murals, are basically mud and hard-packed earth floors. The art is basically Tibetan religious art, and is highly ingrained in the culture - I saw numerous murals on even abandoned dwellings througout Nepal (up to the Tibetan border) - it's not like they call in high-end interior decorators and painters. You will notice there was little (if any) furniture and no other decoration.

So, no need to fear - this wasn't a Potemkin Village/Lhasa Disney situation. But while the Tibetans' traditional clothing and homes look exotic and opulent, bear in mind they are a very, very poor country (and people, regardless of where else they might live), and the materials used are not expensive, high-end goods.

The ethnic minorities in China, too, as Tony correctled pointed out, still keep, mainly, to their traditional clothing, food, etc.

Claudia

Raised in Asia, Trekked through Nepal, Loves Central Asian Culture

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I think this is the best thread to post this...

I´m here in Bogota Colombia visiting my sister and, to my amazement, saw a poster that Tony is giving a talk at one of the colleges here. Tonight. I´m going, of course!!! The topics will be elements in common of great cuisines, from street food in Mexico to Michelin-starred restaurants. I think there is also a Q & A. I can´t believe I have to the southern hemisphere to see him, but I can´t wait.

Edited to say...near the southern hemisphere

Edited by achevres (log)
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I say this every time a new season starts, but it seems like with each iteration the show becomes more and more food-centered, which I always enjoy.

I agree, this is a good thing. When it veers too far away from the food, as I felt it did during the Russia episode, things get pretty boring fast (it's the only episode of his during which I've ever fallen asleep).

This season is off to a good start, though I could have done without Zimmern in the first ep. I can't stand that guy for some reason.

TB's French Polynesian show was just too cool.

Cheers! :cool:

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I say this every time a new season starts, but it seems like with each iteration the show becomes more and more food-centered, which I always enjoy.

I agree, this is a good thing. When it veers too far away from the food, as I felt it did during the Russia episode, things get pretty boring fast (it's the only episode of his during which I've ever fallen asleep).

This season is off to a good start, though I could have done without Zimmern in the first ep. I can't stand that guy for some reason.

TB's French Polynesian show was just too cool.

Cheers! :cool:

I thought the LA episode was too far off the food mark, too - Tony basically got to suit up with the LA SWAT team for a little cool testosterone-y fun. Loved the Tahiti episode - felt the new York one, being a New orker, was a little weak. But next week - the Cleveland Smackdown with Ruhlman!!!

PS: Very cool that Tony is giving a talk in Bogota - no doubt, he's filming an episode there, too, since his trips are almost always multi-purpose (i.e., for NR, maybe an article, too, or a seminar/talk/book tour. Tahiti, I believe, was both an NR episode with a little vacation thrown in, as I believe Ottavia went with him. Good plan.)

Tahiti was a beautiful episode. Havi ng just come ack from Hawai'i myself (on my own version of "NR"), I really enjoyed it, since the original Hawai'ians migrated from the Marquesas, followed later by the the Tahitians.

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The episodes where Tony is "in his element" seem to work best.

A beach has always been one of his favorite "elements", (in both real and fictional guise), and what is Tahiti other than the ultimate beach?

SB (can only dream ..... :cool: )

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Ottavia, dear, you and the baby must be making Tony very happy.  He's a much kindler, gentler guy in this season's shows.  Anyone else notice this?

Who's Ottavia and what baby?

Oops...nevermind...found the info by scrolling back a bit.

Edited by prasantrin (log)
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i just caught the last few minutes of the Cleveland episode. and i wanted so bad to see it all! (waiting on a re-run, already!)

ruhlmans 'House' looks just like he described it in the book. (if you haven't read his book 'House'...get it! he is a wonderful writer. he gets into some historical elements that are quite surprizing. very good read!)

and to see michael and tony sitting on that porch in the ending segment had to be a true toast to Cleveland.

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It really was a great episode--true Bourdain; in the kitchen with loads of pork products, eating local foods (and probably drinking a lot, too) and hanging out with strange and interesting people. Oh, and the bookstore made me want to visit Cleveland, something I've never thought about before.

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