Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Korean noodle dishes


Recommended Posts

Sam Yang Hot

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made chapchae last night :biggrin:

Kris: What are the ingredients you used to make this dish?

I see some bean sprouts, sesame, cellophane noodles(?), carrots, not sure which green vegetable it was, and what other ingredients there were.

The picture looks pretty good!

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made chapchae last night :biggrin:

Kris: What are the ingredients you used to make this dish?

I see some bean sprouts, sesame, cellophane noodles(?), carrots, not sure which green vegetable it was, and what other ingredients there were.

The picture looks pretty good!

the noodles were the ones made from sweet potatoes as discussed in this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...st=0&p=741752

the green vegetable is called seri in Japanese, I think it is minari in Korean and something like mugwort in English.

There was also pork, I prefer beef but didn't have any in the house.

The other ingredients were soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil and garlic, this time I had a lot more sesame seeds than normal because I had 3 kids helping me in the kitchen... :hmmm:

The really wonderful thing about this dish is that is can be made with almost anything and still taste good! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Naeng myeon, cold noodle soup.  An amazing summer dish.

A recipe here: http://fooddownunder.com/cgi-bin/recipe.cgi?r=71684

This is probably my absolute favorite Korean noodle dish, but one that is just too time consuming to make at home....

In the summer I make a trip at least once a month to my favorite Korean restaurant to eat this for lunch and eat some type of refrigerated version once a week.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Kristin,

Great picture. You've made me hungry for Korean noodles. My Korean grandmother used to make magnificent pots of chapchae, and of course in summer I love naengmyon (who doesn't?!).

But what I love best of all is a big bowl of kuksu which in our house we simply called 'Korean spaghetti': son myon (or Japanese somen) noodles (a sort of wheat vermicelli), swimming in a homemade meat broth and garnished with strips of bulgogi, lots of sharp, vinegary cucumbers, soy-dressed spinach or watercress namul, perhaps some kosari dried fiddlehead namul if available, and garnished with thin strips of fried egg, lots of toasted sesame seed and a pile of spring onions shredded on the diagonal.

Come to think of it, it's one of my all time favourite foods on earth. Thanks for reminding me to make some this weekend.

Marc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love: Naengmyon..yummy..Japchae...yummy..

But how about.. dak kalguksoo (korean version of chicken noodle soup) its heavenly in winter! And if u like spicy food, why not try nakjee bokum (dont know the english spelling).. Its a dish with octopus, spicy sauce, vegetables and really delicious slippery noodles...yummy... :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love: Naengmyon..yummy..Japchae...yummy..

But how about.. dak kalguksoo (korean version of chicken noodle soup) its heavenly in winter! And if u like spicy food, why not try nakjee bokum (dont know the english spelling).. Its a dish with octopus, spicy sauce, vegetables and really delicious slippery noodles...yummy... :laugh:

what kind of noodles are used in the nakjee bokum? that sounds like something I would love..

and welcome to egullet! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, sliced rice cakes are used in Chinese cuisine, particularly in Shanghainese regional dishes, just like rice noodles. Tteok I have seen in Mandoo Guk and Tteokbokki, so I am not sure if they are used in other ways.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kristin, your chap chae looks great! I like your ratio of noodles to other ingredients.

On a hot day, mool naengmyon totally hits the spot! I also like bibim naengmyon as well.

I also like champong...although I think it's technically Chinese (like Jajangmyon) but I can only find it in Chinese places that cater to Koreans.

Edited by viaChgo (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kristin, your chap chae looks great! I like your ratio of noodles to other ingredients.

On a hot day, mool naengmyon totally hits the spot! I also like bibim naengmyon as well.

I also like champong...although I think it's technically Chinese (like Jajangmyon) but I can only find it in Chinese places that cater to Koreans.

thanks :biggrin:

champong?

There is a dish of Chinese origin here in Japan pronounced champon, I wonder if it is the same?

It can look something like this:

http://www.machidabisoh.com/pekin/pekin%89...%9C/champon.jpg

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it is a seafood dish, but unlike the photo of champon, the korean chinese jjambbong (짬뽕) is usually deep red from the chile powder and is quite spicy.

it is one of those dishes that you find in the shandong style places that feature hand pulled noodles. ideally you would eat jjambbong with suta guksu (handpulled noodles), just like with jjajangmyeon, another korean chinese favourite.

i saw on television last night that 700,000 bowls of jjajangmyeon are served EACH DAY in korea. i figure most of them cannot be handpulled... that is an incredible number.

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

<a href="http://www.foodtv.co.kr/images/foodclass/namool/recipe/031016_04.jpg">here is a link to a photo of a typical bowl of jjambbong</a>

That seems pretty different from the Japanese version, though they are both seafood and noodle soup like dishes....

The Japanese one is not spicy at all, I think I would prefer the Korean one. :biggrin:

Is the original Chinese one spicy??

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I just brought some black bean paste and made up the dish as I was cooking. I added grounded pork, carrot, onion, shallots, and green pepper in the sauce, which I know might not be very traditional. The paste tasted too salty and thick so I added some brown sugar and water to thin it out. It turned out okay, but not the taste that I was looking for. Next time I will find a recipe and cook from it.

gallery_18176_530_1104892462.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

My wife makes chachang myun sauce with onions, squash and carrots. Sometimes she adds ground beef or some seafood. Sautee the veggies first, add the protein, add the sauce. Okay the trick to getting to taste like restaurant versions is alot of sugar and oil. You can also get some pretty good fresh noodles at the Korean market.

In answer to the question about favorite Korean noodle dish. Mine is makguksu (somen) in anchovy and dashima broth. The kids love it and I do too. Top it with julienned egg omelet, julienned gim and some chopped scallions.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone have a recipe for hand-cut noodles with clams? I had it in Seoul last year and really fell in love with it. Since I am in the midwest its hard to get clams so none of the local Korean places have a version I would dare to try. But bi bim naeng myun is widely available, and also a big favorite, as is chap jae.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone have a recipe for hand-cut noodles with clams? I had it in Seoul last year and really fell in love with it. Since I am in the midwest its hard to get clams so none of the local Korean places have a version I would dare to try. But bi bim naeng myun is widely available, and also a big favorite, as is chap jae.

Are you talking about kalguksu? Were the noodles thick and slighty chewy?

Do you need a recipe for the noodles as well?

The noodles are made from wheat flour (you can use AP), water and salt. Knead untill smooth as if you were making Italian pasta. Let rest, roll out and cut like paparadelle.

The broth was probably a mild anchovy and dashima broth. Water, Korean dried anchovy (the bigs ones), dashima is Korean for Kombu.

If there is a Korean market in your area Pulmuone makes really good fresh Korean noodles. You can also buy a powdered base for the broth. There are online Asian markets as well.

Add garnishes of your choice, such as scallions.

Sorry about the allover the place recipe. .. but I'm in the middle of working on a writing project....

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone have a recipe for hand-cut noodles with clams? I had it in Seoul last year and really fell in love with it. Since I am in the midwest its hard to get clams so none of the local Korean places have a version I would dare to try. But bi bim naeng myun is widely available, and also a big favorite, as is chap jae.

Are you talking about kalguksu? Were the noodles thick and slighty chewy?

Do you need a recipe for the noodles as well?

The noodles are made from wheat flour (you can use AP), water and salt. Knead untill smooth as if you were making Italian pasta. Let rest, roll out and cut like paparadelle.

The broth was probably a mild anchovy and dashima broth. Water, Korean dried anchovy (the bigs ones), dashima is Korean for Kombu.

If there is a Korean market in your area Pulmuone makes really good fresh Korean noodles. You can also buy a powdered base for the broth. There are online Asian markets as well.

Add garnishes of your choice, such as scallions.

Sorry about the allover the place recipe. .. but I'm in the middle of working on a writing project....

Thanks! This is enough direction I think. I don't remember the korean name of the dish, but what you describe sounds about right, though the noodles were more of a fettucine width. I will have to give it a shot next time I see some decent clams on sale.

So let me get this straight, you are french algerian living in the US and married to a Korean woman? And here I thought I was weird :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...