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winesonoma

Best Homemade Macaroni and Cheese

213 posts in this topic

I'm going to make one of my favorite Mac and Cheese recipes tonight, Greek Pastitio or Pastitsio and was wondering what other's favorite recipes were?

Edit: unsure on spelling


Edited by winesonoma (log)

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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I use the recipe on Saveur's site. But I use a combo of cheddar, gruyere and parmesan.

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I used the one from the William Sonoma "American" book last week. Even my husband liked it and he hates mac and cheese. :smile:


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I use extra-sharp cheddar in mine, swirled into a bechamel sauce, and baked extra-long to get a golden crust on top. (I'll have no truck with breadcrumb or crushed-potato chip toppings!)


I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

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There was a previous topic on this subject in which I confessed my use of rather mundale ingredients.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I make something like Alton Brown's recipe but the day after, I love his For Whom the Cheese Melts .. with panko crumbs and all crunchy ... :biggrin:


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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There was a previous topic on this subject in which I confessed my use of rather mundale ingredients.

Yep mine is also similar with a few variations. I used Cabot 50% and use smoked paprika.


Never trust a skinny chef

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Mascarpone, Gouda and Monterey Jack, 2 lbs. cheese to 1 lb. macaroni. Very short cook time as so rich it separates easily.


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Previous discussions:

"Cheese and Macaroni, Homemade, gourmet, or Kraft's?"

"Macaroni and cheese, Continued, recipes"

That being said, my niece likes Patti Labelle's "Over the Rainbow Macaroni & Cheese" which is a heart attack waiting to happen that includes 4 kinds of cheese (5, if you count Velveeta :blink: ).


“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

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There was a previous topic on this subject in which I confessed my use of rather mundale ingredients.

Yes! And I made it. And it was fantastic! Now I have lost it. :sad:


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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This is the original post:

I agree with you 100% There are some "convenience" foods that are worth using because they enable you to do other things with more flair.

I often have people ask me for my recipe for Mac 'n Cheese. I unabashadly tell them my "secret".

First I cook the Creamettes brand elbow macaroni, if that is not available then it is Barilla.

It is then cooked aldente, then drained, tossed back in the pot with butter and a can (or two, depending on the amount of macaroni) of Campbell's Condensed Cheddar Cheese Soup, undiluted.

Stir, pour in a casserole, sprinkle the top with parmesan or asiago, freshly grated and run under the broiler for a couple of minutes.

It is alway creamy, never gets gummy or hard and tastes good.

If we want spicy it is the Nacho Soup I use.

In the meantime, I have baked bread from scratch, cooked fresh mushrooms, onions, tomato and squash, grilled chops or steaks and prepared a killer dessert.

The mac and cheese takes 15 minutes, tops.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I have a friend who makes mac and cheese using the pasta from Easy Mac. But instead of the powdered packet he uses goat cheese and white truffle oil :wacko:


True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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Isn't it easier to just buy pasta in its own box?? Especially given the other ingredients being used which are so delicate ... and expensive .. just a thought ...


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Isn't it easier to just buy pasta in its own box?? Especially given the other ingredients being used which are so delicate ... and expensive .. just a thought ...

Absolutely. That's why the easy mac part is so absurd. I make fun of him for this on a regular basis :biggrin:


True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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There was a previous topic on this subject in which I confessed my use of rather mundale ingredients.

I am the King of eGullet Searches! :laugh:

andiesenji's recipe for mac & cheese (it should take you to the exact post)


“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

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family recipe for baked mac and cheese

1lb box elbow mac,cooked al dente

11/2 cups milk

1 package philly cream cheese

3/4 lb. pack of extra sharp white cheddar

direction--simmer milk and cream cheese till melted pour in buttered 9x9 bakind dish,top entirely with sliced cheddar bake at 350 for 45 mins till cheese is brown on edges**note-great with baked ham :wub:

Enjoy!! Dave s


"Food is our common ground,a universal experience"

James Beard

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SAGE!

Gruyere, garlic, and SAGE!

I like the breadcrumbed, finished-in-the-oven sort.

with SAGE!

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I make the John Thorne inspired, Cooks Illustrated stovetop version, except that I use Monterey Jack for its melting qualities and aged Gouda for flavor. If I don't have aged Gouda, I use really really sharp cheddar.

If you don't know this version, it calls for evaporated milk. My best ever incarnation of the dish occurred when I used leftover evaporated milk that I'd stored in a jar that previously contained smoked mustard. The milk took on this ethereal subtle smoky flavor from the jar that imbued the whole dish. (I just found some more of the mustard, so I plan to save the jar and try to recreate it.)

Although I have to say that the cut up, rolled in panko, deep fried leftovers that Alton Brown made on his show have me re-thinking the bechamel/custard baked-in-the-oven style, just so I could do that with the leftovers.


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
eG Ethics signatory
Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

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Well it was a big hit. By the way Pastitsio has a layer of cinnamon flavored meat in the middle.


Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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I'm going to make one of my favorite Mac and Cheese recipes tonight, Greek Pastitio or Pastitsio and was wondering what other's favorite recipes were?

Edit: unsure on spelling

I just made some four cheese pasta this past week.

Fontina, Gorganzola, Pecorino Romano and Parmesan-Reggiano in decending quantity.

Baked for about 15 minutes in the oven to toast the bread crumb topping. YUM!!! :biggrin:

David

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I use a three cheese combination: a bit of 3 year Shelbourne Farms unpasteurized white cheddar, a milder canadian cheddar, and some parm regg. The Shelbourne Farms give the cheese an extra depth of flavor that's really fantastic. I also tend to use rigatoni instead of elbow macaroni, because I think it holds the sauce and cheese better.

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Well so far everyone who's had mine says it's awesome. But it's not mine, it's Martha's! Sharp white cheddar and gruyere, noodles, creamy bechemel sauce. YUM!

Martha's is the best... :wub::wub: ...the ultimate in comfort food. I bake it in a large shallow baking dish & double the breadcrumb topping, so there's plenty of crunch!

Second best is my grandmother's with Velveeta. Served with fried catfish.

I also like the cavatappi noodles instead of elbow... they hold more cheese sauce.


Edited by viva (log)

...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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I've tried a lot of recipes for mac and cheese trying to find one that's delicious but not ordinary....I think Martha's is excellent! But my very very favorite is one called Macaroni and Cheese with Prosciutto and Taleggio that was in Bon Appetit's How America Eats issue in March of 2002....I'd be happy to send the recipe to anyone who can't find the magazine, since I looked for it over at epicurious and it's not there, unfortunately. I only use half the amount of prosciutto and the cheese, but it's by far the best mac and cheese I"ve ever tasted.

Edited to add: it also used optional truffles and white truffle oil....oh man, I think I'm gonna have to make some this weekend :rolleyes:


Edited by NVNVGirl (log)

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