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Chris Amirault

Drinks! (2011–2012)

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Tonight was the...

Poison Dart

2 oz Bulleit bourbon

1/2 oz orgeat

1/2 oz lemon juice

1/4 oz cinnamon syrup

1/4 oz Cynar

dash pimento dram

dash orange bitters

stir with ice, strain into cocktail glass, orange twist.

I'm still trying to decide if I was ok with it as is or if I wanted more citrus but I liked it in general.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I mixed a Perfect Negroni last night based on EvergreenDan's recommendation. To be honest, I didn't think I'd be able to tell much difference with only a half-ounce change in the overall drink, but I was really surprised. Sure, the drink is still sweet up front, but definitely less syrupy. Not as heavy, if that makes sense. Anyway, thanks for the tip! I'm going to try some of the other variations KD1191 mentioned, but for now the "perfect" version is my preference.

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My incessant pestering has paid off, and the local grog shop is now stocking Batavia Arak! Fresh bottle in hand, I know I can make up a batch of Swedish Punsch, and I know I will now be able to take a stab at some of those great looking Dave Wondrich Punch recipes that I have been dying to try. There is also an interesting CocktailDB recipe for Arrack Cooler with Arak, PR rum, sugar, lemon juice and soda or champagne.

So. . . Any other must-try favorite Arrack recipes I need to know about?

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Tri -- Tried the Poison Dart. Nice. I increased the lemon to 3/4 oz, sub'd Becherovka for Cinnamon Syrup, and use half rye and half bourbon since I didn't have Bulleit bourbon on hand. A very enjoyable drink. Next time I might try all rye and maybe more Cynar. Thanks for posting it.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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I'm going to give those tweaks a try tonight (well, I'll still be using my toasted cinnamon syrup because that's what I have). I was already leaning towards wanting more lemon in it so that sounds good to me.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Slummin' it bigtime today on this lazy Saturday. No rain still in central TX but at least it got overcast today and the resulting 98F seemed downright festive. As a result I turned to the blender and made strawberry "Daiquiris" with Wray & Nephew Overproof, and Pina Coladas with Brugal Anejo and Batavia Arrack Floats. Shame me if you must, but don't judge til you've been in my shoes. We've owned this house now for nearly 14 months and have had only 3 days of measurable rainfall. I had to celebrate even a simple overcast somehow.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I grabbed a recipe for a drink but apparently I didn't get the name when I copied it into my "drinks to try" file (one of these days I need to organize my drink recipes better, the two files I have them in are growing much faster than I'm trying them and it's getting difficult to find things when I want to). Anybody recognize it and know what it's called?

1 1/2 oz bourbon

1/4 oz Green Chartreuse

1/4 oz absinthe

3/4 oz spiced honey syrup

1/2 oz lemon juice

2 dashes Angostura bitter


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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It's the "Death and Company" from the Nov/Dec 2009 issue of Imbibe Magazine.

...I officially need to get out more. (Or less. Not sure which.)


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Tri2Cook,

If you're having trouble organizing and categorizing cocktails, might I suggest EvergreenDan's signature line?

Thanks,

Zachary

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Thanks Matt! I knew I could count on this crowd.

Zachary: I've been to that site numerous times but I guess I'm not too observant. I didn't realize there were tools for organizing available. I'll check it out. Thanks!


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I probably hadn't squeezed any citrus for drinks at home in 6 months, and we're pretty much a bitter, brown and stirred household normally, but we've been on a lime kick lately.

Nothing particularly avant garde, but we're really enjoying the heck out of margaritas with Boston Bittahs.

1.5 oz Milagro Repo / 1 oz Grand Gala / .5 Lime / dash Boston Bittahs (I'm guessing one full squeeze of the eyedropper is ~1 dash)

We've also been making a lot of Daiquiris lately as well - havana club 7 and a couple hemingway daiquiris with the new Bacardi 1909 Ron Superior.

Who knew Bacardi could make a product worthwhile?

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Exhausted and feeling lazy tonight, but definitely in need of some mild sedation. Snifter, one big ice cube, Milagro Select Barrel Reserve Anejo tequila. Done.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Definitely, I'll give that a shot tonight. Any preferred gin for a Negroni? I have Tanqueray, Bombay Sapphire, and Hendrick's at home (not to say I wouldn't run out in search of something new). I've only used the Tanqueray so far - I thought the Hendrick's might be too subtle with the vermouth and Campari.

My preferred Negroni to make that seems to get the most compliments from my guests is closer to KD1191's formula. Plymouth based, slightly gin-heavy, uses the Carpano Antica for the sweet vermouth and a slightly lighter hand with the Campari. Flamed orange peel for garnish adds the flourish both visually as well as taste-wise.

My Best Negroni

1.5 oz. Plymouth

1 oz. Carpano Antica

.75 oz. Campari

Stir and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a big fat flamed orange peel dropped into the drink after flaming. It's also nice on the rocks. Just strain over some fresh ice and flame the orange and drop into the drink.


Edited by KatieLoeb (log)

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Made some Bacon bloody marys last night. Bacon infused Stoli, V8, celery salt, worcestershire, tabasco and pickled green bean. Very savory, very good.

6083967436_59b9ee30bc_z.jpg


Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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2 oz. marmite aromatized rye whiskey (100g marmite per 750ml rye)

half bar spoon of non aromatic white sugar

4 dashes peychaud's bitters

horrific looking yellowed herbsaint rinse

scant lemon twist (so as not to overshadow too much)

very satisfying.

i wanted to re-abstract something already highly abstracted and Marmite seemed like just the thing. Marmite wears quite the cloak of saltiness which is a giant sensory distraction from perceiving her gorgeous aromas. if we could remove the cloak, we could see if lady Marmite looked good naked. i was worried though that like the balsamic fiasco, much of the aroma wouldn't be volatile and the result would be weird (under her many garments, balsamic smells like a lobster). the aroma of yeast turn out to be quite volatile. they are also really important to defining many of the spirits we consume. in many spirits, the yeast is carefully racked off the beer so as not to contribute aroma (fruit eau de vie's; some whiskey's?) while in others they let it go full autolytic (explode and infuse) (jamaican rum; cognanc to a degree; armagnac; the rare yeast eau-de-vie's of france; who knows what else..)

a Marmite aromatized gin might make a lovely french 75.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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So what process did you use to aromatize the rye? Just put them in the same sealed container, but not touching? I assume if you mixed them, you'd end up with some very salty rye...


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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So what process did you use to aromatize the rye? Just put them in the same sealed container, but not touching? I assume if you mixed them, you'd end up with some very salty rye...

i redistilled the two while at my weekend home in new zealand.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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So what process did you use to aromatize the rye? Just put them in the same sealed container, but not touching? I assume if you mixed them, you'd end up with some very salty rye...

i redistilled the two while at my weekend home in new zealand.

Oh. Well, yes, that works too.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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So what process did you use to aromatize the rye? Just put them in the same sealed container, but not touching? I assume if you mixed them, you'd end up with some very salty rye...

i redistilled the two while at my weekend home in new zealand.

Oh. Well, yes, that works too.

i have just heard from multiple people that they put nutritional yeast and olive oil on popcorn. is that for the aroma? what else do people do with yeast?


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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i wanted to re-abstract something already highly abstracted and Marmite seemed like just the thing. Marmite wears quite the cloak of saltiness which is a giant sensory distraction from perceiving her gorgeous aromas. if we could remove the cloak, we could see if lady Marmite looked good naked.

In Australia they have introduced "My First Vegemite" as a gateway drug for kiddies. It's a much less salty version and you can really taste the maltiness. I use it for sauces. Perhaps it would work for infusing but there's no way I'm going to risk my precious bottle of Rittenhouse.

How about Marmite tequila or mezcal?

Yeast and olive oil popcorn is good but I haven't had it in a long time. You can also make a yeast and miso gravy for tofu open face sandwiches.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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For lack of a better name

Meat & Veg

1.5 oz Beefeater gin

0.5 oz Cynar

a small wedge of lemon squeezed over and dropped in.

I build over ice but you could probably stir and strain

Simple but effective. This one has gone into my regular rotation.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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johnnybird took me out for my birthday dinner on tuesday. about the only edible(drinkable?) thing was the elderflower cocktail

2 parts sparkling wine

2 parts sparkling water

1.5 parts st. germaine

pour over ice and serve


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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2 oz. marmite aromatized rye

1 oz. sour orange juice

barspoon of non aromatic white sugar

2 dashes peychaud's bitters

sour orange twist

the bitters help create a drastic divergence of color and aroma. just like blue curacoa but with more positive symbolism. the autolytic aroma is exception in this tart context.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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