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Chris Amirault

Drinks! (2011–2012)

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A friend of mine is currently experimenting with making orgeat using different types of nuts. He gave me a sample of some roasted pistachio orgeat and thus gave this a try:

1.5 Bacardi 8

.75 Cynar

.5 grapefruit juice

.5 roasted pistachio orgeat

.25 lime juice

dash of Bittermens tiki bitters

Shake, strain over ice cubes in a rocks glass. Swizzled crushed ice might be a better approach.

The roasted pistachio plays nicely off the subtle bitterness of the grapefruit and Cynar, and the Bacardi 8 provides just enough weight and lushness without wondering into syrup-y territory. Most of my experiments range from "ehh" to "hide the women and children", but I was pretty happy with this one.

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My collection as it stands:

* A dark rum (Mt. Gay)

* A single malt (Talisker)

* Canadian Club

* Gin (Tanq.)

* Ang. bitters

* Campari

* Vermouth -- dry white and sweet red

* Tonic water and soda water

* Amaretto

* Pernod

Now that I've added the rum and Pernod, what can I do?


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Flipping through DeGroff led me to the London Iced Tea. On a hot, sticky evening, this works rather well.

So, a new question--what should my shopping list look like as a cocktail novice? I have to replace the gin soon but what should I be looking at? At the moment I'm figuring on a white rum (recommendations for decent 'entry-level' ones, please), a cognac (or at least a decent brandy) and a bourbon. I don't really like overly sweet things (including and maybe especially drinks) but I wouldn't mind checking out some of the orange-flavoured things in the book, either.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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So, a new question--what should my shopping list look like as a cocktail novice? I have to replace the gin soon but what should I be looking at? At the moment I'm figuring on a white rum (recommendations for decent 'entry-level' ones, please), a cognac (or at least a decent brandy) and a bourbon. I don't really like overly sweet things (including and maybe especially drinks) but I wouldn't mind checking out some of the orange-flavoured things in the book, either.

Recent topic started here that might help with your question although it is mostly about what liqueurs to add to a basic bar. Probably a relevant topic in here somewhere about basic bar components as well.

Each base spirits tends to have a good discussion as well. The rum thread has some suggestions on white rums for example


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Chris - Follow your taste. I think your gin choice (Tanqueray) is fine. Adding a white rum, a bourbon, and definitely an orange liqueur (Cointreau would be a great choice) are all advised.

Assuming you bought the Campari because you like it, make a Negroni. If you like that, make a Boulevardier(after you buy that bourbon). After you buy the orange liqueur, sub Amaretto for Orgeat and make:

Bitter Mai Tai

by Jeremy Oertel, Brooklyn's Dram, NY

1 1/2 oz Campari

3/4 oz Jamaican rum, Smith & Cross

1 oz Lime juice

3/4 oz Orgeat

1/2 oz Curaçao

Shake and strain into an Old Fashioned glass over crushed ice, garnish with a mint sprig.

You can also make Martinis, Manhattans (both Canadian club and, better yet, bourbon (or later, my fav American rye)), an Old Pal, Gin- or Rum-and-Tonics, Old Fashioned, Tom Collins, Mojitos (best with your new white rum, although tasty with dark rum too), Daiquiris, Whiskey Sours, Sazerac (buy Peychaud's bitters and sub Pernod for Absinthe) and many more.

I'm sure if you narrow your question a bit, you'll get lots more recommendations and suggestions. You can make a ton of cocktails with that collection. I don't think you'll find the Amaretto very useful and I probably would replace the Canadian Club with an American Rye when you finish the bottle. Keep at least the dry vermouth in the refrigerator with a Vac-u-vin (sold at any good liquor store). I'd put the sweet in there too.

Some brand recommendations, collected from eGullet, Chowhound, and elsewhere.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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The vermouths and gin are sitting on the fridge. I like Tanq.--I'm not replacing it because it's shit, but because it's damn near run out. And yeah, the plan was to track down a reasonably priced, proper rye when the Canadian Club is done. As much as I know--and knew, even when I bought it--that it wasn't ideal, I figured and still think it's fine for those first tentative steps.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Last night, after getting glass stuck in the same foot whose ankle I sprained 24 hours earlier, I needed a strong-ass drink. A Pusser's old fashioned, as it turned out. A splash of 1:1 turbinado syrup, 3 dashes angostura, ice, and an unmeasured pour of Pusser's blue label. Excellent drink, followed when finished by a smaller splash of Smith & Cross on the remaining rocks (blasphemy, I know).

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Last night was the Rum Dinner at Pura Vida in Atlanta hosted by Ed Hamilton featuring rum drinks from head mixologist Paul Calvert and food from head chef Hector Santiago.

The evening started with a variety of "pupus" (deviled eggs with bacalao, buñuelos do caritas, malanga chips with avocado aji and of course chicharrones) and a welcome cocktail called Noble Rot created by Paul for the evening featuring Smith & Cross rum, Cocchi Americano, grapfruit juice, angostura bitters and a splash of Cava in a flute. Light and tasty even with the use of the S&C. Never had it before but it has typically been described as having a wee bit of "funk". But it seemed to work well.

Next up was Tuna Poke with all manner of flavors on top to include pickled ginger and garlic, sour orange caviar and tapioca flakes. The featured drink was a simple but delicious Daiquiri #1 using Neisson rhum agricole blanc, lime and petite canne syrup garnished with a lime wheel in a coupe.

The main course was a delicious slow roasted pork (is anything better than rum and pig? I think not!) and various sides (pigeon pea salad with green banana escabeche, arroz con tocino, etc). Accompanying the main course was an Old Strangler, again presumably created by Paul for the evening. It had The Scarlet Ibis rum, watermelon syrup, cynar, lime and angostura bitters over ice in a Collins glass with a cinnamon stick as garnish. This gave the drink the strong aroma of cinnamon as you drank it and added a very nice touch.

Desert followed with coconut cake tres leches style with a very intense passion fruit ice cream on the side. I liked the ice cream but some found it too strong. This was paired with a Rum Old Fashioned using Ron Zacapa 23 with a bit of petite canne syrup, angostura bitters and Regans orange bitters stirred over ice and served in an old fashioned glass over a large cube of ice. Very nice indeed!

The evening concluded with rum tastings and conversation with Ed. Featured rums included the Ron Zacapa 23, Neisson Réserve Spéciale, El Dorado 12yo, Cruzan Aged, Flor de Cana 7 (I think) and a bottle of both the new and old Lemonhart 151.

A delightful evening was had by all! Well at least I did.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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My mission today is to make another batch of celery syrup and to create a tomato syrup and come up with a few new cocktails for each. Anybody have any great suggestions? I'm all ears. So far I've made a Jalisco Cel-Ray with reposado tequila, celery syrup, club soda and a splash each of fresh lime juice and ginger ale. Simple but delicious and effective.

The tomato syrup will be made by simmering grape tomatoes in a little white wine until soft, running them through a food mill and then slightly reducing and making a 1:1 simple syrup with the reduced tomato essence. I think I might add just a splash of white balsamic for some acidity if deemed needed once cooled. I'm thinking bourbon or gin. Vodka is too obvious. Other thoughts?


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Maybe Aquavit and lemon with that tomato syrup? Actually, that sounds good with the celery too. Also, gin, celery, and maybe Pimm's or Cynar?

I'm not a huge lover of floral flavors, but I wonder if Creme de Violette or Lavender bitters would work well with the celery syrup? Maybe something inspired by an Aviation?

Let us know what you come up with!


Edited by EvergreenDan (log)

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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All good thoughts. Thanks Dan! Will report back with any wild successes...


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Yajna - I'd be curious to know the recipe for the Washington Flip. It sounds like a nice autumn cocktail.

Re anise: it should present but not dominant, I think. There isn't good consensus about what a "dash" is of something that doesn't usually come in a dasher bottle. Maybe the Green Street was a little too heavy-handed?

Cocktail à  la Louisiane

by Restaurant de la Louisiane, New Orleans, LA

3/4 oz Rye

3/4 oz Sweet vermouth

3/4 oz Bénédictine

3 ds Absinthe

3 ds Peychaud's Bitters

1 Maraschino cherry (as garnish)

Stir, strain, straight up, cocktail glass, garnish

As for myself, I made the Trinidad Sour again. Really a nice drink, if a bit in-your-face. I think I should have bought the big bottle of Angostura when I replenished last time.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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I think you are right about the anise evergreendan, the amount may have been just right for many people, but i am kind of sensitive to anise flavours, and like them well in the background.

The Washington flip was a perfect fall cocktail. I am going to work on getting a bottle of benedictine so I can make it at home.

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Anyone happen to know the measures for the Violet Hour's Holy Mole (Herradura Reposado, Dolin Sweet Vermouth, Averna, Chocolate Bitters)? Being in Canada, I can't really pop by the bar but it sounds tasty. I'd like to check out The Pusher Man (Lunazul Blanco, Pineapple, Egg White, Green Chartreuse) too but I don't want to be too greedy with requests. :biggrin:


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Anyone happen to know the measures for the Violet Hour's Holy Mole (Herradura Reposado, Dolin Sweet Vermouth, Averna, Chocolate Bitters)? Being in Canada, I can't really pop by the bar but it sounds tasty. I'd like to check out The Pusher Man (Lunazul Blanco, Pineapple, Egg White, Green Chartreuse) too but I don't want to be too greedy with requests. :biggrin:

Here is one guess.

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Monkey Gland. I used the amount of Grenadine DeGroff suggested (i.e. a couple of drips) and ended up with an ugly-coloured cocktail--not the glorious orange thin in the photo. This shit is worse than saffron powder and tandoori colouring.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Anyone happen to know the measures for the Violet Hour's Holy Mole (Herradura Reposado, Dolin Sweet Vermouth, Averna, Chocolate Bitters)? Being in Canada, I can't really pop by the bar but it sounds tasty. I'd like to check out The Pusher Man (Lunazul Blanco, Pineapple, Egg White, Green Chartreuse) too but I don't want to be too greedy with requests. :biggrin:

Here is one guess.

Thanks Kerry. Something to start with anyway.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Anyone happen to know the measures for the Violet Hour's Holy Mole (Herradura Reposado, Dolin Sweet Vermouth, Averna, Chocolate Bitters)? Being in Canada, I can't really pop by the bar but it sounds tasty. I'd like to check out The Pusher Man (Lunazul Blanco, Pineapple, Egg White, Green Chartreuse) too but I don't want to be too greedy with requests. :biggrin:

Here is one guess.

Thanks Kerry. Something to start with anyway.

I've confirmed the measures on the Holy Mole after further "research"...

2 oz Herradura Reposado

1 oz Dolin Sweet Vermouth

1/2 oz Averna

2 Dashes Housemade Chocolate Bitters

Stirred & strained into a rocks glass over large ice, garnished with a grapefruit peel.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Just to clarify, when we say "Dolin Sweet Vermouth," are we talking about sweet red vermouth?

Yes


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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