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Drinks! (2011–2012)


Chris Amirault
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**the special absinthe is turkish raki "aromatized" with sloe berry eau-de-vie to boost the alcohol and add aroma plus yerba mate instead of wormwood for its darker aromas.

in drinking the remainder of the rinse i was really impressed with how the sloeberry complemented the anise. the aromas was really stretched out. yerba mate pulls on those aromas in the same was as wormwood, but darker.

Yerba mate? As in what seemingly everybody in Montevideo drinks 24/7? Didn't even know it was readily available in the US.

What was the Turkish raki that you used? I acquired a bottle of Yeni raki on a whim a few months ago after a trip to the Middle East. Was looking for Lebanese arak (I have since seen some at drinkupny) but this was the closest I could find at the time. Haven't really figured out what to do with it other than mixing with water and sipping as is more or less done in the Middle East.

there are some excellent tea shops in my area. yerba mate is fairly common around here. you can even get it smoked.

i can't remember what raki i used. i bought it miss priced at $11.00 for a 750ml. my theory in selecting raki's is that if you buy that oldest most dated looking label that doesn't say raisin, you're more likely to get a rougher more fun sort of spirit base. some of the varietals they use, i'm pretty sure, are cousins of moscat, and therefore produce aromas similar to a pisco.

the strange blend of exoticisms reminds me of gene wolfe's "book of the new sun".

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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Tonight was a Corpse Reviver #2 (my first drink with my newly aquired absinthe...a part of me is SCREAMING that I should've made a Sazerac first...but Corpse Reviver won given that I still need to buy a bar spoon -- I've been using regular spoons, but wanted to treat my first Sazerac right :P )

Got the recipe from KC, was an interesting drink. I wasn't sure what I thought of it at first, but it kept inviting me back for another sip, then another, then another. And while I don't think I'd have another at the moment, it was intriguing enough that I will want to drink one again...im still not sure if I loved it (it lacked a certain amount of depth), however it was more than drinkable and further experimentation will be required.

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Corpse Reviver #2 ... im still not sure if I loved it (it lacked a certain amount of depth), however it was more than drinkable and further experimentation will be required.

If you happen to have Clement Creole Shrubb, sub it for the triple sec, or add a dash or two of Angostura Orange bitters. If you happen to have Cocchi Americano or even Bonal Gentiane Quina, sub that for Lillet. That should give you some depth. I've tried the CCS + BGQ combo and loved it.

Also a stand-up juniper-forward gin would help.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Thanks for the tips, I used Tanqueray, so not the most forward gin, ill use my Hendricks next time and see how that plays.

I don't believe we have much in the way of any of the other ingredients in British Columbia, but the Creole Shrub is on my list of things to get. I don't have the Angostura brand orange bitters yet, just Fee Brother's, thought seriously about adding them, but decided against it b/c i didn't think they'd fit quite right.

Today's drink is Old Fashioneds as it's Turkey Day up here in Canada, so even though I'm American if I must participate in local customs I guess I will. Going to make a Lairds 100% Apple Brandy Old Fashioned and a Maker's Mark one (w/ a bit of orange peel muddled in, sugar, bitters, nothing else)

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Thanks for the tips, I used Tanqueray, so not the most forward gin, ill use my Hendricks next time and see how that plays.

Do try the Hendricks, but Tanqueray and Beefeater are two of the most juniper-forward gins (what Dan was suggesting) in wide distribution. Me, I lean toward Beefeater for Corpse Revivers, although all taste is personal.

 

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Corpse Reviver #2 ... im still not sure if I loved it (it lacked a certain amount of depth), however it was more than drinkable and further experimentation will be required.

If you happen to have Clement Creole Shrubb, sub it for the triple sec, or add a dash or two of Angostura Orange bitters. If you happen to have Cocchi Americano or even Bonal Gentiane Quina, sub that for Lillet. That should give you some depth. I've tried the CCS + BGQ combo and loved it.

Also a stand-up juniper-forward gin would help.

Interesting suggestions. Just got some Creole Shrub and have a bottle of Cocchi on order that hopefully will arrive this week at some point, primarily because of its advertised properties of being more like the original Lillet. But would not have thought of using the Shrubb here. Will have to give it a try.

Thanks for the tips, I used Tanqueray, so not the most forward gin, ill use my Hendricks next time and see how that plays.

I would think that the original Tanq would be pretty much near the top of juniper forward gins. The Hendricks might tend to get lost a bit in this drink. But always worth a try to see what you like!

Last night I found it wasn't all that long a way to Tipperary after all. A nice drink but may have to try it again to see if it is one I want to have on a regular basis.

I was searching around on the KC website looking for ideas for using the Clement Creole Shrubb and came upon the Margara.

1 1⁄2 oz Añejo tequila

3⁄4 oz Clément Créole Shrubb

3⁄4 oz Lime juice

1⁄2 oz Cynar

2 "dashes" Angostura Orange Bitters

Shake, strain, straight up, cocktail glass half-rimmed with salt.

I probably will skip the salt altogether. Very odd but interesting sounding drink.

Since I have just recently also acquired Cynar it seemed like a great opportunity to try out both with one of my añejo tequilas. Might leave the 100 proof Dulce Vida on the shelf this time and go with something a little lighter though!

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Maybe I'm just used to Tanqueray then (It's my standard mixing gin, I like Hendricks in Gin & Tonics and the like). For me the Corpse Reviver 2 tasted like an OK gin cocktail in a glass with an absinthe rinse, didn't meld too well and wasn't exceptional. I think for sure I need to do some tinkering, and once i get the ingredients im most certainly going to try the above suggestions.

Tonight had a Makers Mark old fashioned, muddled 1 t sugar, orange peel, 2 ds angostura and stirred, made a good old fashioned.

Did the same thing with Knob's Creek Whiskey and it made a very different drink, much woodier and less of a tail to it. I think they were both equally good, just so different (I haven't used my Knob's Creek in a cocktail yet).

Then was Lairds Apple Brandy Old Fashioned, which was the same as above, except using lemon peel instead of orange. This was the highlight of my night as I cook thanksgiving dinner, the citrus elevated the Apple brandy and made an absolutely stunning drink, think this is my new Thanksgiving go to.

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I was searching around on the KC website looking for ideas for using the Clement Creole Shrubb and came upon the Margara.

1 1⁄2 oz Añejo tequila

3⁄4 oz Clément Créole Shrubb

3⁄4 oz Lime juice

1⁄2 oz Cynar

2 "dashes" Angostura Orange Bitters

Shake, strain, straight up, cocktail glass half-rimmed with salt.

I probably will skip the salt altogether. Very odd but interesting sounding drink.

Since I have just recently also acquired Cynar it seemed like a great opportunity to try out both with one of my añejo tequilas. Might leave the 100 proof Dulce Vida on the shelf this time and go with something a little lighter though!

Ended up giving this task to the Corzo añejo since I like the Casa Noble and El Mayor añejo too well as a sipper. But the Corzo is about gone so I may have to crack open the bottle of Don Sergio añejo a friend gave me to try.

But mainly I think I still have a way to go to develop a full appreciation for the stronger bitter tasting liqueurs. This one was OK but was not like the Eva Peron that has made Fernet Branca work for me. Needs just a little more sweetness to help balance out the drink like perhaps a 1/2 oz of simple.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Hosted a dinner party last night... made some Guanabana Margaritas for the ladies (guys had flights of Cucapa microbrews from Tijuana)... the Margs turned out quite well.

14 oz package of Goya brand frozen Guanabana pulp

6 oz reposado Cazadores Tequila (or some other crappy characterless tequila like Patron that isn't worth sipping :laugh: )

3 oz Cointreau

1 Cup Water

6 tablespoons refined sugar (I like the grainy texture in this)

Juice of 1 Lemon plus squeeze of the Lemon oil

1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract (preferably from Veracruz)

Dash of organic ponzu (the kind made with real yuzu)

Blend the frozen pulp with the other ingredients... freeze in a martini pitcher for about 30 minutes before serving.

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.5 oz. kaffir lime juice

4 grams non aromatic white sugar

.25 oz. r. jalinek kosher slivovitz

1.5 oz. vale d'paul unaged cape verdean rum

i found some kaffirs today at formaggio kitchen. i intended to make a simple daiquiri, but upon realizing the juice smelt like pine sol floor cleaner i opted to add some slivovitz for a contrasting aroma in hopes it would break the negative association. i have a feeling it saved the day, but even using cape verdean rum, anyone blind tasting this would think it a gimlet over a daiquiri. i think i like it enough to finish the rest of the kaffirs.

i know people think my drinks are getting boring and predictable, but have no fear, i just found a vast repository of new ingredients.

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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Took another run at the Margara, this time adding a half ounce of 1:1 simple syrup.

I was searching around on the KC website looking for ideas for using the Clement Creole Shrubb and came upon the Margara.

1 1⁄2 oz Añejo tequila

3⁄4 oz Clément Créole Shrubb

3⁄4 oz Lime juice

1⁄2 oz Cynar

2 "dashes" Angostura Orange Bitters

Shake, strain, straight up, cocktail glass half-rimmed with salt.

Improved for me but perhaps too sweet for others. I will have to keep playing with this and other variations on a Margarita to see what I find works best. I confess I do tend to like them a bit on the sweet side anyway (One of my favorites recipes uses Damiana liqueur). Will go back and look at other drinks that call for Cynar and/or the creole shrubb as well.

But started the evening off with a 1.5 oz pour of El Dorado 15yo and the Plantation 20th Anniversary rum to get into my "training" for the upcoming rum dinner in Atlanta next week. First had a bit of each at room temp and then added a 1" block of ice to each. Both were excellent but I if I had to choose a favorite I think it would have to be the ED 15yo which I thought had a bit more "personality". Next I will have to throw the Ron Zacapa 23 into the mix but thought two was plenty for one evening.

Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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2 oz. belgium aromatic malt aromatized white wheat whiskey

1 oz. carpano antica formula

bitter like the best espresso, but it is probably an illusion of aroma. if i used another vermouth i could probably sneak in a spoonful of maraschino.

at first i thought this grain was too brash to use, but then i just went for it. now i'm in love.

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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Follow up... in general the Mexican spirits universe is open for the taking. Ron Cooper is just covering a tiny fraction of what there is to be promoted.

As I see the obsession over classic Cocktails made with Bitters etc., I am thinking there is a huge opportunity to market the strong herbal "unintentional bitters" produced in Veracruz... and similarly the stone fruit producing regions of Veracruz have fantastic fruit liqueurs, while the coastal regions produce stunning Rum etc.,

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Made (and tasted) an Old Fashioned for the first time. Essential Cocktail (DeGroff) hasn't landed yet so after reading the 'who would win in a fight--Batman or Spiderman?'-esque Old Fashioned thread I went out and bought some rye and bitters and gave Wikipedia's recipe a go (sans the cherry). Probably an inferior recipe to what the average eGulleter might use, but hey. I like the drink. I see it maybe even toppling the gin and tonic (the only other cocktail I know how to make) as my go-to summer drink (not that it's summer ... but it never hurts to start early).

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Made (and tasted) an Old Fashioned for the first time. Essential Cocktail (DeGroff) hasn't landed yet so after reading the 'who would win in a fight--Batman or Spiderman?'-esque Old Fashioned thread I went out and bought some rye and bitters and gave Wikipedia's recipe a go (sans the cherry). Probably an inferior recipe to what the average eGulleter might use, but hey. I like the drink. I see it maybe even toppling the gin and tonic (the only other cocktail I know how to make) as my go-to summer drink (not that it's summer ... but it never hurts to start early).

Glad you liked it. Which rye?

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Made (and tasted) an Old Fashioned for the first time. Essential Cocktail (DeGroff) hasn't landed yet so after reading the 'who would win in a fight--Batman or Spiderman?'-esque Old Fashioned thread I went out and bought some rye and bitters and gave Wikipedia's recipe a go (sans the cherry). Probably an inferior recipe to what the average eGulleter might use, but hey. I like the drink. I see it maybe even toppling the gin and tonic (the only other cocktail I know how to make) as my go-to summer drink (not that it's summer ... but it never hurts to start early).

Glad you liked it. Which rye?

Well, partly rye. Canadian Club.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Chris, you might enjoy a Manhattan with that "rye" and bitters. Just buy a bottle of sweet vermouth. Good cherries (such as Luxardo) are with it, if you can find them. Otherwise I'd just skip the cherry.

If you can find American Rye in Australia, it is quite a bit more interesting than Canadian Club. I'm guessing it would be expensive, though.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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this is too easy.

"black dog"

2 oz. belgium aromatic malt aromatized white wheat whiskey

4 g. non aromatic white sugar

4 dashes peychaud's bitters

rinse of raki-prunelle-sauvage-yerba-mate "absinthe"

the 2 grams per ounce method works wonderfully to create "simplified gustation" style aroma driven drinks.

the cohesion here is spectacular. the tonality and gentle contrasts are epic.

Edited by bostonapothecary (log)

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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If you can find American Rye in Australia, it is quite a bit more interesting than Canadian Club. I'm guessing it would be expensive, though.

I'm guessing it would be too. The LCBO brought in a limited stock of Sazerac 6 year, the only American rye to hit the store that I know about, and it went for $45/750ml. Outrageous, scandalous... I grabbed three. :biggrin:

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Chris, you might enjoy a Manhattan with that "rye" and bitters. Just buy a bottle of sweet vermouth. Good cherries (such as Luxardo) are with it, if you can find them. Otherwise I'd just skip the cherry.

If you can find American Rye in Australia, it is quite a bit more interesting than Canadian Club. I'm guessing it would be expensive, though.

Well that's the thing. My tastes in booze are normally 'simple'--good quality beer, nice single malt, nice cognac. I don't tend to mix or order cocktails. As such I wasn't going to go all out and buy an expensive (but obviously superior quality) rye or bourbon, something I normally wouldn't drink, given there was a fair chance I wouldn't have enjoyed the end product.

I'm going to pick up some Campari and sweet red vermouth (I already have some dry vermouth) to expand my options: figuring on sampling Negronis and Manhattans.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Need a call from someone that knows. I've seen 2 versions of the Angel Face online. Both with calvados, gin and apricot but one with lemon and one without. Which is correct?

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Well that's the thing. My tastes in booze are normally 'simple'--good quality beer, nice single malt, nice cognac. I don't tend to mix or order cocktails. As such I wasn't going to go all out and buy an expensive (but obviously superior quality) rye or bourbon, something I normally wouldn't drink, given there was a fair chance I wouldn't have enjoyed the end product.

I'm going to pick up some Campari and sweet red vermouth (I already have some dry vermouth) to expand my options: figuring on sampling Negronis and Manhattans.

My Dan Murphy's now carries Wild Turkey 100 proof rye for the same price as the bourbon. Not that any spirits are cheap in Australia. I think they started to stock it after I asked - before they just had Jim Beam Rye. I've seen obscenely expensive Rittenhouse on the web. But hey, if you drink good whisky and cognac...

I find it interesting that blended Scotch gets more respect than Canadian rye. Aren't they both more or less whiskey cut with neutral spirits? Not that Canadian rye is the same as American 100% rye. I actually like CC, partially because the taste evokes good memories, but I don't drink it very much.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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