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Ed Hamilton

Stroh Rum?

16 posts in this topic

The last time the question of Stroh rum surfaced it was in the topic titled 'Canadian rum line up, a prejudiced view.'

I don't know what they say about Stroh in your country, but it is not Rum.

Stroh Original comes from the Austrian "Sebastiaan Stroh" from Klagenfurt. They are famous for their aroma, that has been kept a secret all there years. They use an unknown basic spirit (but not a Rum) and add a sugarcane spirit and the aroma. Therefor it is not a Rum. In the old days the name Rum was written on it. Now this is forbidden (in Europe).

You may wish to take this up with Stroh

or their holding company Eckes Stock International both of whom clearly identify the brand as Rum.

If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck and sounds like a duck - it's a duck.

According to Stock, the holding company I received the following:

Composition of "Stroh Rum"

The alcoholic basis of Stroh is exclusively genuine rum produced from sugar-cane molasses.

According to an old Austrian tradition and a secret recipe from the house of Stroh, this rum is refined with the finest essences and aromas. This recipe comes from the founder of the Stroh company, Sebastian Stroh, and has been passed down for generations and retained in its original form. This refinement process lends the rum its distinctive aroma which is known throughout the world, and which the connoisseur associates with a bit of Austria.

The legal framework conditions, as contained in Ordinance (EG) No. 1576/89 on the Council and Codex Alimentarius Austriacus, Section B23 on spirits, does not allow us to identify our product as rum, since it is not permitted for rum to undergo this type of refinement and flavouring process.

Stock Austria Gesellschaft mbH

On behalf of

Jutta Pika

Quality Assurance

As to the source of the genuinely rum produced from sugar-cane molasses, I have been led to believe that it somewhere in India, though I've yet to identify the distillery.

So it looks like Stroh may have to do some work on their labeling in the US as well.

The research continues.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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This is interesting. I was under the (obviously mistaken) impression that Stroh was made from Sugar Beets, not sugar cane. I thought that was the distinctive flavor & aroma.

This stuff is mighty potent. Comes in at 80 Proof. Definitely will singe the hairs out of your nose if sniffed at. YIKES! On the other hand, it is the cure for all that ails me when in bed with a serious head cold. A wee dram of this stuff in your Thera-Flu and you'll sleep like a hero, sweat like a beast and wake up completely cured! :biggrin:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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This stuff is mighty potent.  Comes in at 80 Proof.  Definitely will singe the hairs out of your nose if sniffed at. 

Stroh is actually available in a number of different proof levels - here in Canada we get "54" which is definitely not overpowering.


''Wine is a beverage to enjoy with your meal, with good conversation, if it's too expensive all you talk about is the wine.'' Bill Bowers - The Captain's Tavern, Miami

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The last time the question of Stroh rum surfaced it was in the topic titled 'Canadian rum line up, a prejudiced view.'

The alcoholic basis of Stroh is exclusively genuine rum produced from sugar-cane molasses.

So it looks like Stroh may have to do some work on their labeling in the US as well.

The research continues.

What would be the labeling issue in the US if the source is exclusively genuine rum ? Just wondering.


''Wine is a beverage to enjoy with your meal, with good conversation, if it's too expensive all you talk about is the wine.'' Bill Bowers - The Captain's Tavern, Miami

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Ed,

I know they buy a lot of light rum distilled in Italy, I've been told molasses based imported from pakistan. If they distill below 96% .......?? so it can be called rum as the law asks .. who knows?

regads,

Ed

The last time the question of Stroh rum surfaced it was in the topic titled 'Canadian rum line up, a prejudiced view.'
I don't know what they say about Stroh in your country, but it is not Rum.

Stroh Original comes from the Austrian "Sebastiaan Stroh" from Klagenfurt. They are famous for their aroma, that has been kept a secret all there years. They use an unknown basic spirit (but not a Rum) and add a sugarcane spirit and the aroma. Therefor it is not a Rum. In the old days the name Rum was written on it. Now this is forbidden (in Europe).

You may wish to take this up with Stroh

or their holding company Eckes Stock International both of whom clearly identify the brand as Rum.

If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck and sounds like a duck - it's a duck.

According to Stock, the holding company I received the following:

Composition of "Stroh Rum"

The alcoholic basis of Stroh is exclusively genuine rum produced from sugar-cane molasses.

According to an old Austrian tradition and a secret recipe from the house of Stroh, this rum is refined with the finest essences and aromas. This recipe comes from the founder of the Stroh company, Sebastian Stroh, and has been passed down for generations and retained in its original form. This refinement process lends the rum its distinctive aroma which is known throughout the world, and which the connoisseur associates with a bit of Austria.

The legal framework conditions, as contained in Ordinance (EG) No. 1576/89 on the Council and Codex Alimentarius Austriacus, Section B23 on spirits, does not allow us to identify our product as rum, since it is not permitted for rum to undergo this type of refinement and flavouring process.

Stock Austria Gesellschaft mbH

On behalf of

Jutta Pika

Quality Assurance

As to the source of the genuinely rum produced from sugar-cane molasses, I have been led to believe that it somewhere in India, though I've yet to identify the distillery.

So it looks like Stroh may have to do some work on their labeling in the US as well.

The research continues.

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I just saw some Stroh in San Francisco and noticed that as opposed to it being touted as rum, rum is listed as one of the ingredients. Interesting approach.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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Because of the many stories that were heard about Stroh (including by me) I did some extra searching. Here is the story so far as I know it:

The reason why Stroh cant name 'their product "Rum" is a legal reason.

The name "Rum" is protected in many countries (including Europe and USA). In the Decree (EG) No. 1576/89 article 1 (4) a, it is said, that rum is

that spirit which is exclusively made by alcoholic fermentation and

distillation of sugar cane sirup and sugar cane molasses.

Still, the main ingredient of Stroh is Rum. But they also add flavouring agents like vanilla and so on, to it according to an old secret recipy. They can call their product "Spiced Rum" but the name "Spiced Rum" is not a legal definition in Europe. Therefore they call their product "spirit" instead of "Rum", except in Canada. On the labels of Stroh 54 in Canada the product is defined as "Spiced Rum - Rhum Epice" because the legislation allows it.

In the old days they also had the name "Inlanderrum" on it. That's forbidden too now. This product only exists in Austria and it is defined as follows:

Inländerrum is that spirit which is made from sugar cane and sugar

cane molasses distilled and produced in Austria. Therefor Stroh is not an Inländerrum.

As soon as I know more, I will let you all know.


The more information, the better.

Rene van Hoven

www.Rumpages.com

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This stuff is mighty potent.  Comes in at 80 Proof.  Definitely will singe the hairs out of your nose if sniffed at.  YIKES!  On the other hand, it is the cure for all that ails me when in bed with a serious head cold.  A wee dram of this stuff in your Thera-Flu and you'll sleep like a hero, sweat like a beast and wake up completely cured! :biggrin:

80º Proof = 40% Alc/Vol

Stroh 80 is 160º Proof or 80% Alc. Sorry to be such a pedant :unsure:

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FWIW, the 80% Stroh rum is rarely consumed as such. It's mainly used for

1) the notorious Jagatee (hunter's tea, something like grog), the stuff that many skiers in Austria drink before or Après Ski after the last downhill.

2) Rumtopf (rum pot), a large pot you start filling with fruits in early summer (strawberries, raspberries) and then continue with all kind of freshly harvested fruits during the season. You keep the fruits covered and hence preservated with Stroh rum. The high percentage keeps the proof high enough when diluted with the liquidity content of the fruits. Consumed during and after christmas day. Great stuff. Served warm with vanilla ice cream is a real crowd pleaser!


Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler.

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I believe the reason rum is listed as one of ingredients is that rum is just that one of the ingredients, but since it is refined to more than 96% it can't be labeled as rum in many countries. It is being discontinued in many stores in the US.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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I just saw some Stroh in San Francisco and noticed that as opposed to it being touted as rum, rum is listed as one of the ingredients. Interesting approach.

a liquor store?

I'm interested in picking some up; appreciate if you recall the place you saw it.

(Had to catch myself to not call the liquor store a 'package' store; New England (at least CT) habits die hard...)


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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John Walker downtown. It was in the discount close out bin, so you should hurry.

Thanks much.

(Checking out their website, John Walker's looks like a great place to know about too...)

As an aside, in East of Paris, David Bouley's Danube restaurant (Austrian, NYC) cookbook he has this quote on p. 298:

Most Austrian desserts are made with a dark,  highly aromatic rum call Stroh rum.  While it's hard to find here..., it's nearly ubiquitous in Austria, where is has the dubious distinction of being the rum of choice for both pastry cook's baking projects and college-age kids' drinking binges.

Dark rum is quoted as a substitute...


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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This stuff is mighty potent.  Comes in at 80 Proof.  Definitely will singe the hairs out of your nose if sniffed at. 

Stroh is actually available in a number of different proof levels - here in Canada we get "54" which is definitely not overpowering.

Bought it yesterday at LCBO Vintages, where the 93 rating from WS or Wine Tidings was touted.

This stuff is potent, and 54 refers to 54% or 108 proof. Not bad, for $28.

Too bad it smells like cheap perfume. I suppose I' ll get through it somehow, maybe with aspartame based cola. :sad:

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The last time the question of Stroh rum surfaced it was in the topic titled 'Canadian rum line up, a prejudiced view.'
I don't know what they say about Stroh in your country, but it is not Rum.

Stroh Original comes from the Austrian "Sebastiaan Stroh" from Klagenfurt. They are famous for their aroma, that has been kept a secret all there years. They use an unknown basic spirit (but not a Rum) and add a sugarcane spirit and the aroma. Therefor it is not a Rum. In the old days the name Rum was written on it. Now this is forbidden (in Europe).

You may wish to take this up with Stroh

or their holding company Eckes Stock International both of whom clearly identify the brand as Rum.

If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck and sounds like a duck - it's a duck.

According to Stock, the holding company I received the following:

Composition of "Stroh Rum"

The alcoholic basis of Stroh is exclusively genuine rum produced from sugar-cane molasses.

According to an old Austrian tradition and a secret recipe from the house of Stroh, this rum is refined with the finest essences and aromas. This recipe comes from the founder of the Stroh company, Sebastian Stroh, and has been passed down for generations and retained in its original form. This refinement process lends the rum its distinctive aroma which is known throughout the world, and which the connoisseur associates with a bit of Austria.

The legal framework conditions, as contained in Ordinance (EG) No. 1576/89 on the Council and Codex Alimentarius Austriacus, Section B23 on spirits, does not allow us to identify our product as rum, since it is not permitted for rum to undergo this type of refinement and flavouring process.

Stock Austria Gesellschaft mbH

On behalf of

Jutta Pika

Quality Assurance

As to the source of the genuinely rum produced from sugar-cane molasses, I have been led to believe that it somewhere in India, though I've yet to identify the distillery.

So it looks like Stroh may have to do some work on their labeling in the US as well.

The research continues.

Ed,

They do buy genuin rum, light rum as it is, could be from anywhere as long as it can be called rum and it is cheap. I know it came from both Guyana and from Trinidad, but also from Italy.....( just import molasses and your on your way to ( european) rum.

But its all light supplied at 95,5% so clean and very very low in esters, the addition of the flavours will cover up the differences between the light rums.

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In its homeland Austria the Stroh Rum is more generally known as "Inlander Rum". Do a web search and you'll find many providers. The taste is unmistakable if an unusual acquired taste. Echoing the comments of Scheer, the prevalent taste is that of the added aromas/flavorings. What percentage In my opinion and in the opinion of many an Austrian, it has nothing to do with Rum from the Carribbean regions. Most local market sales are for cooking and ski-ihutte hot drinks.

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