Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
trillium

Bergamot oranges are in season

Recommended Posts

Just bumping this to note that Rising C Ranches has their bergamot in season again -- mine came this morning (bright and early), along with a box of rangpur limes.

I'm wondering how bergamot would go with cachaca, specifically the Boca Loca that NH just started carrying and that I fell in love with at first sip -- so some combination is on the docket for this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the timely thread bump. I just read about Seville Orange season the other day, and was planning to look for them at the Hollywood Farmer's Market this Sunday. Not that I need another batch of orange bitters, I think it would be interesting to make a batch entirely from scratch, including the drying of the peel.

But, now I'm more intrigued by finding Bergamots. In addition to trying them fresh, I'd love to make a cordial or, perhaps, Bergamot bitters?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the timely thread bump.  I just read about Seville Orange season the other day, and was planning to look for them at the Hollywood Farmer's Market this Sunday.  Not that I need another batch of orange bitters, I think it would be interesting to make a batch entirely from scratch, including the drying of the peel.

But, now I'm more intrigued by finding Bergamots.  In addition to trying them fresh, I'd love to make a cordial or, perhaps, Bergamot bitters?

i've got my case and half of seville peels steeping... but i did not dry them out. they have a really big moisture content which will dilute your alcohol but i see no advantage to drying them if you were not going to save the peels for later...

i put a sugar content, starting alcohol content dissection of cointreau on my blog if anyone wants to make an orange liqueur. the intensity of the peels is up to you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bitters are on my mind too. On top of that I have a bottle of "whatever I feel like putting in it" citrus liqueur that started with Seville and clementine rind, wound up with some Meyer lemon zest and passion fruit, and that I think I will just continue to put bits and pieces of zest into as each new citrus fruit comes into season. Maybe I'll wind up with the alcoholic version of Five Alive.

It's not bergamot-related and I'm sure I said so in another thread, but I love Seville juice in sours. Bourbon, rye, or good rum, sometimes a little bitters in there too. Even if I didn't make marmalade, I'd pick up Seville oranges just for sours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try the large fruit/vegetable joint in the Chelsea Market--Toby Cecchini and I just scored some there; they call them "sour oranges"--3 for $1.

One thousand blessings be upon you, my friend. Will check soonest.

Were they there? Looking for some myself.

Unfortunately, upon checking it appeared to me that the sour oranges they had there were, indeed, sour oranges. :sad:

Rats! That's where I was going to try. A quick google brings up this place which will ship you a dozen for $30. I have no idea if they are reputable....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure how Sevilles got into the Bergamot thread. The best place to buy either of them in the East Bay is Berkeley Bowl; right now they have plenty of Sevilles but no bergamot. Last year we got Sevilles all January and February there. Last year we added a little bergamot juice to one batch of seville marmalade and that was great.

Bergamot has a very short season--like maybe three weeks here. Usually it is around New Years. In years past on New Year's eve we made Bergamotinis by simply subbing bergamot juice (but a bit less) for lemon juice in a Leap Year cocktail. Very exotic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you in the east bay who are interested, my husband just came back from Berkeley Bowl with a bergamot and a pile of Sevilles. He claims the Sevilles appear to be a fresh crop and better looking than the last two batches we bought. And this is the first time he's seen bergamot there this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those in Los Angeles, I found Bergamots at the Hollywood Farmers Market this morning. The seller is Mud Creek Farms, on the West side of Ivar, about 1/2 block North of Sunset. They're also at the Santa Monica Farmers Market on Wednesdays.

ETA: I just made a Friday After Five from the top of this thread, and it's a fabulous drink. Raising my glass in a toast to its creator.

Alright, one more addition: I used the other half in a Last Word (with a dash of lime juice to round it up to 3/4 oz), and it's a really nice variation. The unique perfume of the bergamot really comes through. Makes me wonder how they'd work in lieu of the lemon juice in a Shanghai Gin, but that's an experiment for another night.


Edited by jmfangio (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone see bergamot in NYC this season? I just had some shaved over a shrimp dish at Corton, but I forgot to ask if they had a local source for it. There is a grower in California that sells them by the 6 lb. box (http://www.ripetoyou.com/index.php?option=com_wrapper&view=wrapper&Itemid=94), expensively shipped to the East Coast, but I don't think I need quite that much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I saw some at Eataly last week. However, i try to block out the citrus there since it is obscenely overpriced. Buddha's Hand (very small) were 9 bucks a pop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the pointer. Now I have a reason to make it over to Eataly finally. If it's really absurd, maybe I'll propose splitting a box with someone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked one up from Eataly yesterday. There was a huge basket. One was just about 2 bucks! :-(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was fortunate enough to pick up a few bergamot from Waitrose at about 15p each, which I've processed into bergamot simple syrup, which tastes amazing and also a batch of bergamocello. 

 

The Bergamocello has been a disaster, I was about to go on holiday and didn't have enough vodka in the house so I used a little gin to make up the liquid, thinking this would add a nice edge to the flavour and I was completely wrong.  I stupidly picked up Hendricks as the gin, as I had an unopened bottle I was gifted ready to replace the bottle on the shelf. It's not a gin I drink regularly and it's added a terribly soapy flavour that has completely ruined the liqueur.. any suggestions on how to rescue this would be welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never made bergamocello, but here are some thoughts based on my other 'cello-making efforts.  You can try any of the flavor options on small samples to see how they work.

  1. You could give it some more time to let the flavors mellow.  I assume you've sweetened it and diluted it to adjust the alcohol level. I find that just sitting for a few weeks has taken the edge off some harsh tasting mixtures.
  2. Make sure you are tasting at serving (freezer) temp.  Maybe the off-flavor you taste will be diminished when it's colder.
  3. Consider adding another botanical.  Fresh rosemary or juniper berries could boost up the gin-type flavors you were going for and balance out the flavor you dislike.  I had good success with a grapefruit-rosemary 'cello.  Just don't over infuse the herbs.  I made a lemon-sage version that's so woody, it's like swallowing a tree trunk.   
  4. Make a tincture of black or oolong tea and blend it with your bergamocello to make an Earl Grey liqueur.  
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×