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Food Related Insults


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someone or something boring can be called vanilla.

small children and loved ones are my little dumplings

when my friend was preganant she was carrying a little peanut

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

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In Japan, 'daikon ashi' (daikon legs). Describing women whose legs are shaped like, well, daikon.

And all too often given maximum and unflattering exposure in a mini-skirt. :wacko::hmmm:

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In Japan, 'daikon ashi' (daikon legs). Describing women whose legs are shaped like, well, daikon.

And all too often given maximum and unflattering exposure in a mini-skirt.  :wacko:  :hmmm:

In Taiwanese my mother calls too-skinny legs "bamboo legs." (Hey, it's food if you're a panda.)

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I seem to be on a daikon roll here (as it were)...

In Japanese again, a daikon actor is a bad actor, i.e. a ham actor in English.

Two food-related insults for the price of one. :rolleyes:

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In Japan, 'daikon ashi' (daikon legs). Describing women whose legs are shaped like, well, daikon.

And all too often given maximum and unflattering exposure in a mini-skirt.  :wacko:  :hmmm:

Same thing in Korean. 'mu dali' daikon legs It's usually in reference to thick calves.

'ojingo dali' octopus legs refers to skinny, gangly legs.

'oli guleum' means duck walk, the opposite of pigeon toes.

These descriptions are usually reserved for women. :hmmm:

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How 'bout red as a beet? Faster than quick-rise bread? Greatest whatever

since sliced bread? Okay, this one stretches it, maybe; hungrier than a coyote on

a five day fast? There's two sides to a pancake? A hot tamale? Grinning

like a possum eating hornets? Tough enough to eat a glass sandwich?

Slower than molasses in January? :rolleyes::biggrin:

Edited by Mabelline (log)
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Chicken in Cantonese = prostitute

I learned it was "ji nu" or, "roadside chicken"!

I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

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what about "mutton dressed as lamb"?

i think its ancient britspeak for an older lady trying

to dress way too young and unsuitable and

unfortunately being very obvious about it...

milagai

In canada they are known as 'cougars' (well, you can't really eat cougars, at least not the real feline ones, though if someomone served one I might try....)

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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  • 8 months later...

As best as I can remember, tonight was the first time in my life when I was insulted by being called a food.

I was telling a local chef (whom I admire) about a dessert I recently made, and my spouse said, "You're such a genoise." At first, I thought he meant that I was a lighty delicate pastry that was a perfect foundation for wonderful things. Then he clarified and said that I was being a sponge, trying to get the chef's praise.

He was right, although I was rightly offended. So, what other food insults are out there...

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As best as I can remember, tonight was the first time in my life when I was insulted by being called a food. 

I was telling a local chef (whom I admire) about a dessert I recently made, and my spouse said, "You're such a genoise."  At first, I thought he meant that I was a lighty delicate pastry that was a perfect foundation for wonderful things.  Then he clarified and said that I was being a sponge, trying to get the chef's praise.

He was right, although I was rightly offended.  So, what other food insults are out there...

I hope you said, "That takes the cake!" :raz:

Deb

Liberty, MO

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