Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
pedro

eG Forums Q&A with Ferran Adria

Recommended Posts

eG Forums Q&A with Ferran Adria, December 15-17, 2004

The Q&A forum officially opens on December 15th, but we will begin accepting questions on Monday, December 13th. Please read this before posting.

gallery_10675_460_1102621301.jpg

Ferran Adria in the El Bulli Kitchen

Photo: Francesc Guillamet ©

Most of the members of the eGullet Society will be familiar with the works of Ferran Adria. Considered by many the most influential chef in the world, the traces of his work at El Bulli can be found in menus and restaurants located thousands of miles away from his restaurant in a Mediterranean cove. His approach to cooking has changed the way we perceive contemporary gastronomy: from the conception of the individual dishes to establishing an independent creativity department; from the creation of sophisticated techniques which result in new and unique textures to the redefinition of what a tasting menu and dining is.

The eG Forums are the leading independent repository of information about Ferran Adria, so we invite those who would like to get a better understanding of his works to take a look at:

The Cabinet of Dr. Adria

Eight at El Bulli

Twenty-seven Small Courses of Ferran Adria

El Bulli, Soler and Adria in Context (excerpt from the book Text and Pretext in Textures)

El Bulli web site

To view some video clips of the upcoming television program "Decoding Ferran Adria", starring eGullet Society member and food television personality Tony Bourdain, please be sure to visit the Zero Point Zero website: Decoding Ferran Adria

gallery_10675_460_1102623023.jpg

El Bulli in Roses on the Mediterranean

Photo: Francesc Guillamet ©

About Ferran Adria and El Bulli

Adria's legendary El Bulli restaurant has been awarded three stars in the Michelin guide for the past nine years. It originally opened in 1967, as a casual eatery for divers, but was transformed into a temple of contemporary gastronomy thanks to Adria's driving force.

In 1998, the great Joel Robuchon said, "There are chefs who characterize their era, but they are few and far between. There was of course Fredy Girardet, Alain Chapel and some others. Today, I have the feeling that Ferran Adria of the restaurant El Bulli at Roses in Spain has the makings of such a kind."

In August 2003, Arthur Lubow wrote in the New York Times, "Ferran Adria's restaurant El Bulli in the Catalan seaside town of Roses, a two-hour drive north of Barcelona, is a gastronome's once-before-you-die mecca. It's not merely the three Michelin stars (although only three other Spanish restaurants boast that distinction) or the top rating in Spain's most influential food guide. The accolades from other cooks are amazing."

gallery_10675_460_1102622369.jpg

Juli Soler and Ferran Adria

Photo: Francesc Guillamet ©

Adria was born in 1962 in Santa Eulalia, a neighborhood in L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, near Barcelona. Twenty years later, he took charge of a kitchen for the first time: while doing his military service, he was part of the kitchen staff of a high-ranking general. In 1983 he staged for one month at El Bulli, where he returned in 1984 as chef de partie. In 1986 he became the chef at El Bulli. He and his partner Juli Soler bought the restaurant in 1990.

Today, El Bulli is probably the most difficult place in the world to get a table. The restaurant is open six months a year, serves only dinner, and has a capacity of sixty seats. The 8,000 seats available for the entire 2005 season are already sold out; half a million requests for reservations will go unfulfilled.

Adria has produced several books, including the three volume series El Bulli 1983-2002, Los secretos de El Bulli, and El Bulli, El Sabor del Mediterraneo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By flippant
      I've had the CSO for a number of years now, but have yet to actually bake bread in it.
       
      Reading through the Modernist Bread thread on this forum I see many of you are using the CSO to great effect, which is heartening.
       
      To that end, I would like to know about your experience baking bread in it – what sort of extra equipment you use (pans, cast iron? etc), what breads work the best, any corrections you find yourself making, or anything you feel might be useful to someone else using the CSO.
       
      Thank you!
       
       
    • By Rho
       
      The space race trickled into kitchens in the 60s and 70s, including one curious tool that's faded away in the years since: the thermal pin, a heat pipe skewer that can halve cooking times for roasts:

       
      Heat pipes are thermal superconductors, transferring heat 500-1000 times more effectively than solid copper (some people in the sous vide thread have discussed copper pins). They're hollow tubes with the air evacuated and a small amount of working fluid, often water. The usable temperature range is limited by the triple point and the critical point, with additional constraints near the edges. Water is effective from 20C-280C /70F-530F, which comfortably spans most cooking temperatures.
       
      Modernist Bread has an excellent section on how bread bakes, including a diagram of the internal heat pipes that develop, summarized here. (click for a good photo!)
       
      Sous-vide solves the overcooking side of the gradient problem, but it's still limited by total heat diffusion time-- doubling the size of a cut quadruples the time needed for the center to reach temperature. Heat pipe pins should make larger cuts practical, or normal cuts cook faster. Here's a graph from "The heat pipe and its potential for enhancing the cooking and cooling of meat joints", showing average temperatures over time for 1kg joints of meat convection baked at 190C/375F for 110 minutes (foil removed for the last 30 minutes):

       
      Thermal pins were sold commercially from 1956 to about 1990. They're listed occasionally for about $20 on ebay. They even made potato baking racks with heat pipes-- though now you can easily par-cook a potato in the microwave and finish it in the oven.
       
      I don't know why production of thermal pins stopped, or what fundamental problems limited their usage. It seems like pans and commercial griddles would be improved by adding heat pipes to spread heat throughout and avoid hot or cold spots. Perhaps roasts fell out of favor as the culture of entertaining shifted away from monolithic centerpieces to smaller, more precisely cooked portions.
    • By philie
      Hey there, i hope to find some help in the wise hands of yours. after some research i am still having some problems concerning glazing:
       
      For a party i would like to make some cubes and rounded savoury cakes and foams out of silicone forms that have a ready bottom and a colour glazing. 
      Somehow i just do not manage to find a steady glazing ( one that does not run ) and is for texture reasons preferably hard or crisp that does not include sugar or syrup.
       
      can you help me or lead my way in a certain direction?
       
      thanks very much!
    • By KennethT
      Is there a discussion in the book about the purpose of adding ascorbic acid?  I just saw the contest #2 in which the recipe called for it.  I'm curious because a woman I know on the internet used to work in a bakery in Vietnam, and said that to get similar results to the banh mi there, you need to add ascorbic acid.  Does it act as a gluten relaxer?  Traditional banh mi have a very tender and crisp crust, and a very light and tender, relatively closed crumb.
    • By Tuber magnatum
      Having experienced the "Edible Balloon" dessert at Alinea, I have been on a quest to try this at home.  Only recently was I able to find purportedly a recipe:
      https://www.buzzfeed.com/raypajar1/these-edible-helium-balloons-are-dessert-from-the-future?utm_term=.ut6r3PnMk#.acGNVWmd6 the video of which is found below.
       
      I tried this and probably no surprise, it failed.  The bubble collapsed / popped with only a little distension.   I wasn't sure if the problem was that a "secret" ingredient (e.g. some kind of surfactant to stabilise the bubble or using a different kind of sugar) was missing.  Or maybe I didn't allow the mix to come to correct temperature etc.  Elsewhere I thought I had read that the original recipe was in effect some kind of taffy.  Has anyone else had success, or do any candy makers /modernist chefs, have suggestions they are willing to share?
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×