Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Stollen Recipes


Recommended Posts

Best Stollen, Wisconsin German style (Dresden style)

From Ella Odekirk, farm wife.

12 ozs white bread flour, I use regular all purpose.

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoon yeast, (instant or rapid acting)

1/4 pint milk so this is 5 fluid ozs UK, and 4 fluid ozs U S.

3 ozs softened butter

2 ozs sugar

1 egg

2 ozs currants

2 ozs raisins

4 ozs sultanas (white raisins)

1 oz mixed peel chopped fine

2 ozs cherries, quartered

2 ozs chopped pecans, walnuts or lightly toasted, sliced almonds

6 ozs almond paste

4 ozs icing sugar

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Preheat oven to 375'

Mix salt with flour and place in warm bowl, place in low oven few minutes to completely warm flour mix, add yeast and stir in.

Warm the milk, butter and sugar, stir to dissolve.

Whisk egg into milk mixture and make sure it's not hot only warm, then pour onto flour mix.

Mix well until the mixture leaves the sides of the bowl cleanly, forming a ball.

Add mixed candied fruit and nuts.

Turn the dough out onto floured board and knead until fruit are evenly distributed through dough, 5 minutes.

Return to oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and leave in warm place to double in volume.

Turn out, lightly knead a few times.

Flatten into a square and roll into oblong about 14 inches x 8 inches.

Form almond paste into a log slightly shorter than length of dough, about 13 inches long, lay down middle of dough, then roll dough around it.

Pinch and turn under ends to close.

Place dough on parchment on a baking sheet, cover with damp cloth and place in a warm area to rise.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

When a depression remains after pushing into the dough with a finger, place on center rack in oven and bake 35 minutes.

Slide parchment paper from baking sheet to cooling rack. Cool for at least 30 minutes.

While still warm, mix XXX sugar with enough lemon juice to make a stiff paste.

Spread on warm stollen and add a few extra chopped cherries and pecan or walnut halves to decorate. Cool completely.

P.S.

I usually triple this recipe and make either 4 smaller stollen or 2 large ones from the batch.

Andie

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cresci on Stollen:

Every North European country has its own Stollen

A traditional Christmas cake, it is formed by three layers (nece its long shape) of the same dough, which are then twisted to create a final triangular shape.

They go on to say that the the three layers and the triangualr shape are symbols of the the Trinity; Butter, Rasins and Almonds are also a symbolic trinity, and also symbolise fertility, money and long life..

My adaptation:

Dresdener Stollen

Sponge

Flour 900 47.37%

Milk 350 18.42%

Yogurt 250 13.16%

Starter 60 3.16%

Sugar 30 1.58%

Mix, rise at 26C until tripled

Flour 1000 52.63%

Egg Yolk 100 5.26%

Rum 100 5.26%

Salt 40 2.11%

Vanilla 2 0.11%

Orange peel 20 1.05%

Icing sugar 400 21.05%

Butter 700 36.84%

Sultanas 1200 63.16%

candied peel 400 21.05%

Almonds 350 18.42%

Mix, double, divide, shape, rise at 26C for 3 hours

Marsipan log optional

Total flour 1900 100.00%

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is unusual b/c it is a quick bread version of stollen, but we have had the recipe for ~40 years so it has been reliable. I find it is a bit more moist than the traditional stollen and much easier to make.

2 1/2 cups flour

2 tsp bkg powder

3/4 cup sugar

salt, mace, cardamom

3/4 cup ground blached almonds

1/4 lb cold butter

1 cup cottage cheese, whirled in processor til smooth

1 egg

1/2 tsp each vanilla and almond extract

2 tbl rum

1/2 cup each currants and golden raisins

1/4 cup chopped candied citrus peel

3 tbl melted butter

2 tbl vanilla sugar

Combine flour , baking powder, sugar, salt, mace, cardamom, and almonds. Cut in butter.

Blend cottage cheese, egg, vanilla, almond, rum, currants, raisins, peel. Stir this mixture into the flour mixture. Mold into a ball, knead 6-8 turns until smooth.

Roll dough out to 8x10 inches. Brush dough with melted butter. Crease dough just off center and fold smaller section over larger.

Bake 45 minutes at 350 degrees.

Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with vanilla sugar.

Best after 2-3 days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

What is the shelf life of stollen?

My GM gave me a recipe he would like me to make for 150 of our company's closest friends. I don't like stollen and have only made it at one bakery, nine years ago, so I am basically in the dark. This recipe has no eggs and not much sugar or alcohol, and I am worried about the stollens drying out and getting stale between baking and delivery. Also, we are at 7000 feet, and dry thin air is going to be a factor as well.

So, how long should I hope for stollen to stay fresh? How can I extend the shelf life?

thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is the shelf life of stollen? 

My GM gave me a recipe he would like me to make for 150 of our company's closest friends.  I don't like stollen and have only made it at one bakery, nine years ago, so I am basically in the dark.  This recipe has no eggs and not much sugar or alcohol, and I am worried about the stollens drying out and getting stale between baking and delivery.  Also, we are at 7000 feet, and dry thin air is going to be a factor as well.

So, how long should I hope for stollen to stay fresh?  How can I extend the shelf life?

thanks

stollen does tend to be a bit dry, but traditionally you dip it in melted butter and then dredge it in powdered sugar. you do this twice so that it gets a nice crust. this helps with the shelf life. also, the almond paste in the middle has some moisture which i'm sure gets leached into the pastry itself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used the following recipe for about 20 years; it was from the "Sharing Recipes" column of the late, great Pleasures of Cooking magazine from Cuisinart when the Cuisinart food processor was first introduced in this country. The recipe is an old German family recipe brought to this country by Constantia Just, a woman in her 90s when this was contributed (1980s). Though this doesn't contain marzipan, which does help with keeping qualities, it does have both potato in the dough and a glaze on top, both of which would help preserve moisture.

1 pkg dry yeast

1/3 cup sugar (2 1/2 oz; 70g)

1/4 cup warm water (60ml)

3 1/4 cup a-p flour (16 oz; 450 g)

1 tea ground cardamom

1/4 tea salt

8 oz unsalted butter, cut into 8 T (4 oz; 110 g)

1/4 cup mashed potatoes (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

1/4 cup + 1 T cold milk (75 ml)

1 large egg

1 1/2 T brandy

1 tea fresh lemon juice

1/2 cup mixed candied fruit , lemon, orange, pineapple ( 3 1/2 oz, 100g)

3/4 cup golden raisins (4 1/2 oz; 125 g)

1/4 cup currants (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

1/4 cup blanched, slivered almonds (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

Glaze: 1 cup 10x (4 oz; 110 g); 1 T fresh lemon juice; 1 T water

Dissolve yeast and 1 T of the sugar in the warm water; when bubbly, stir in milk, egg, brandy, and lemon juice. Process remaining sugar, flour, cardamom, salt, and 6 pats butter for 20 sec; add the potato. With motor running, pour in liquids thru feed tube as fast as it can be absorbed. Process til it forms a ball, about 45 sec. It will be smooth and slightly sticky. Remove and divide in half. Put the fruits and nuts into the processor; add the dough and pulse a few times to knead roughly. Remove and knead by hand for a minute or two to distribute evenly. Shape into a ball and put into a floured gal ziplock bag, squeezing out air. Let rise about 2 hrs. Punch down, roll or pat out to a 14x10x5/8" (35x25x2cm) oval. Gently fold the long side over to within 3/4" (2 cm) of the opposite side and press lightly to seal; curve ends to form a crescent. Place on greased sheet and cover with oiled plastic; let rise until double. Melt remaining butter; brush stollen and bake at 375F (175C) for 45 min; cover loosely with foil if gets too brown. Remove to rack; drizzle glaze while still warm.

Happy Holidays!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used the following recipe for about 20 years; it was from the "Sharing Recipes" column of the late, great Pleasures of Cooking magazine from Cuisinart when the Cuisinart food processor was first introduced in this country. The recipe is an old German family recipe brought to this country by Constantia Just, a woman in her 90s when this was contributed (1980s). Though this doesn't contain marzipan, which does help with keeping qualities, it does have both potato in the dough and a glaze on top, both of which would help preserve moisture.

1 pkg dry yeast

1/3 cup sugar (2 1/2 oz; 70g)

1/4 cup warm water (60ml)

3 1/4 cup a-p flour (16 oz; 450 g)

1 tea ground cardamom

1/4 tea salt

8 oz unsalted butter, cut into 8 T (4 oz; 110 g)

1/4 cup mashed potatoes (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

1/4 cup + 1 T cold milk (75 ml)

1 large egg

1 1/2 T brandy

1 tea fresh lemon juice

1/2 cup mixed candied fruit , lemon, orange, pineapple ( 3 1/2 oz, 100g)

3/4 cup golden raisins (4 1/2 oz; 125 g)

1/4 cup currants (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

1/4 cup blanched, slivered almonds (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

Glaze: 1 cup 10x (4 oz; 110 g); 1 T fresh lemon juice; 1 T water

Dissolve yeast and 1 T of the sugar in the warm water; when bubbly, stir in milk, egg, brandy, and lemon juice.  Process remaining sugar, flour, cardamom, salt, and 6 pats butter for 20 sec; add the potato. With motor running, pour in liquids thru feed tube as fast as it can be absorbed. Process til it forms a ball, about 45 sec. It will be smooth and slightly sticky. Remove and divide in half. Put the fruits and nuts into the processor; add the dough and pulse a few times to knead roughly. Remove and knead by hand for a minute or two to distribute evenly. Shape into a ball and put into a floured gal ziplock bag, squeezing out air. Let rise about 2 hrs. Punch down, roll or pat out to a 14x10x5/8" (35x25x2cm) oval. Gently fold the long side over to within 3/4" (2 cm) of the opposite side and press lightly to seal; curve ends to form a crescent. Place on greased sheet and cover with oiled plastic; let rise until double. Melt remaining butter; brush stollen and bake at 375F (175C) for 45 min; cover loosely with foil if gets too brown. Remove to rack; drizzle glaze while still warm.

Happy Holidays!

Thanks for an interesting version with potatoes, I look forward to trying it. A question though: the glaze formula is lacking (probably sugar). Is it crystalized or icing sugar?

I actually have some old copies of Pleasures of Cooking, I'll have to dig them out to see if I have this one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used the following recipe for about 20 years; it was from the "Sharing Recipes" column of the late, great Pleasures of Cooking magazine from Cuisinart when the Cuisinart food processor was first introduced in this country. The recipe is an old German family recipe brought to this country by Constantia Just, a woman in her 90s when this was contributed (1980s). Though this doesn't contain marzipan, which does help with keeping qualities, it does have both potato in the dough and a glaze on top, both of which would help preserve moisture.

1 pkg dry yeast

1/3 cup sugar (2 1/2 oz; 70g)

1/4 cup warm water (60ml)

3 1/4 cup a-p flour (16 oz; 450 g)

1 tea ground cardamom

1/4 tea salt

8 oz unsalted butter, cut into 8 T (4 oz; 110 g)

1/4 cup mashed potatoes (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

1/4 cup + 1 T cold milk (75 ml)

1 large egg

1 1/2 T brandy

1 tea fresh lemon juice

1/2 cup mixed candied fruit , lemon, orange, pineapple ( 3 1/2 oz, 100g)

3/4 cup golden raisins (4 1/2 oz; 125 g)

1/4 cup currants (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

1/4 cup blanched, slivered almonds (1 1/2 oz; 45 g)

Glaze: 1 cup 10x (4 oz; 110 g); 1 T fresh lemon juice; 1 T water

Dissolve yeast and 1 T of the sugar in the warm water; when bubbly, stir in milk, egg, brandy, and lemon juice.  Process remaining sugar, flour, cardamom, salt, and 6 pats butter for 20 sec; add the potato. With motor running, pour in liquids thru feed tube as fast as it can be absorbed. Process til it forms a ball, about 45 sec. It will be smooth and slightly sticky. Remove and divide in half. Put the fruits and nuts into the processor; add the dough and pulse a few times to knead roughly. Remove and knead by hand for a minute or two to distribute evenly. Shape into a ball and put into a floured gal ziplock bag, squeezing out air. Let rise about 2 hrs. Punch down, roll or pat out to a 14x10x5/8" (35x25x2cm) oval. Gently fold the long side over to within 3/4" (2 cm) of the opposite side and press lightly to seal; curve ends to form a crescent. Place on greased sheet and cover with oiled plastic; let rise until double. Melt remaining butter; brush stollen and bake at 375F (175C) for 45 min; cover loosely with foil if gets too brown. Remove to rack; drizzle glaze while still warm.

Happy Holidays!

Thanks for an interesting version with potatoes, I look forward to trying it. A question though: the glaze formula is lacking (probably sugar). Is it crystalized or icing sugar?

I actually have some old copies of Pleasures of Cooking, I'll have to dig them out to see if I have this one.

10x=confectioner's sugar=icing sugar

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd like to know if anyone has tried, rather than using pure almond paste or marzipan down the middle, something like an almond filling, like frangipane in their stollen. My bakery is planning on

doing stollen but the owner wants to stretch out the almond paste since it's so expensive.

Anyone tried it?

Edited by chefpeon (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd like to know if anyone has tried, rather than using pure almond paste or marzipan down the middle, something like an almond filling, like frangipane in their stollen. My bakery is planning on

doing stollen but the owner wants to stretch out the almond paste since it's so expensive.

Anyone tried it?

Haven't tried frangipane but think the resulting cakey texture would be weird. I would chop almond paste and distribute it in the dough if you want to cut back on the amount.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd like to know if anyone has tried, rather than using pure almond paste or marzipan down the middle, something like an almond filling, like frangipane in their stollen. My bakery is planning on

doing stollen but the owner wants to stretch out the almond paste since it's so expensive.

Anyone tried it?

I started a thread not too long ago looking for suggestions for "cutting" the almond paste to give it a better taste and texture (and as a byproduct saving a few bucks). There are some suggestions there.

I just did a stollen trial where I cut the almond paste "eye" in the middle of the stollen with a proportion of 300gr. almond paste to 50ml. of simple syrup and a couple of drops of bitter almond. This gives a nicer texture as well and, although it may not be the large cost saving your boss is looking for, it helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's an almond filling that I use in a Dutch pastry called "Banket" that I might try in the Stollen.

It's not "cakey" at all. I will probably give that a go first and see how it goes. :smile:

What sort of components go into this banket filling?

(how cute, "banket" reminds me of how little kids say "blanket")

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What sort of components go into this banket filling?

# 1 1/2 cups almond paste

# 2 eggs

# 3/4 cup white sugar

# 1/4 teaspoon almond extract

# 1 pinch salt

I might mess with this.....like add just egg yolk, and perhaps cut in a little butter too.

There's no flour in it to risk giving it a cakey feel.

Funny what you said about "banket". At work, we call it "Blanket" or "Blanky" just to amuse ourselves. :raz:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...