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Source for wattleseed around Portland?


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I've bought ground, roasted wattleseed online from Australia, so it's neat to see a US source. I first used it for a wattleseed Pavlova that a client requested, but since then I've also used it to infuse cream for ganache, and in whipped cream, where it's delicious.

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Any chance you could tell us a little bit about what wattleseed is and what you plan to do with it?

Wattleseed comes from a native Australian bush that grows in the outback. They are little seeds that you grind up and use for flavoring, it's kind of like a nutty, chocolatey, coffee-ish taste which is damn good. The guy in Australia who kind of brought it to a lot of peoples attention, can't remember his name but he started what was basically the first 'bush tucker' company, intended to use it as a replacement for coffee in making espresso.

It goes good in both savoury and sweet dishes. I've used it in sauces for game and duck but I think it works better in desserts. Basically you can use it anything you might flavor with coffee. Wattleseed ganache is the best ganache I have ever had. It's also good in anglaise, ice cream, bavarois, brulee etc....

Thanks for the link.

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  • 1 year later...

Just for the record....

Wattleseed is a highly versatile and nutritious flavouring invented by Vic Cherikoff in 1984. The product known commercially as Wattleseed is made by roasting a specific species of Acacia seed and has a flavour profile of coffee, chocolate and hazelnut. The seeds from around 120 species of Australian Acacia were traditionally used as food by Australian Aborigines and they were eaten either green (and cooked) or dried (and milled to a flour).

Hope that helps..

Edited by chefben (log)
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Wow, very interesting. I may have to get some myself to play with. Thanks for posting the topic.

Found a few recipes for those who may be interested:

Pavlova:

http://www.foodiesite.com/recipes/2000-08/wattlepav.jsp

Souffle:

http://thepassionatecook.typepad.com/thepa...eseed_choc.html

Ice cream:

http://www.6pr.com.au/recipes/recipes_wattleseedicecream.pdf

Creme brulee:

http://www.nirmalaskitchen.com/australia_recipe1.php

Another ice cream:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/cda/recipe...LL-PAGE,00.html

Amazingly, Amazon.com actually sells wattleseed: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0001M2DU...lance&n=3370831

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Have you tried the australian store down at saturday market? The one in the permanent building by the fountain that sells the dry as a bone jackets and whatnot? They have some food items, candy bars that are difficult to find, etc. It's a long shot but they might be worth a try. I don't recall the name of the place.

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Called Australian Originals. They don't have it and don't know where to get it in portland.

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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