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Latkes - the Topic!


Fat Guy
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Shaved and white. It's an Italian restaurant remember:wink:. I mean can't you see Italian Jews doing this? Truffles should be kosher, and it's just a local ingredient.

Personally, I don't see what the big deal about latkes is. They make them all year long. Nothing about the Hanukah latkes seem special to me. They are fun to eat as a social occassion but as special food? Why are they more special in December then they are in May?

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Due to 1 ocean parting us and different time zone, I can apologize only now for forgetting there is some "cultural" difference between Europe and the U.S : For us , here in Israel Magimix (for food processor) is what Fridgeder and Coke are for Americans I guess .

Just for general info: the French maker is very trust worthy, and if I'm not totally mistaken, there is an American parallel or partner named culinariart or cuiseinart.

Nina: the Hebrew word for pancakes/Latkes is Levivot. (Anyone asking for Levavot will probably end up with skewer of chicken hearts (-; .

To settle matters I offer hereby the first 3 E-gulleteers who arrive to Israel my own hand made PRIME - LATKES free.( I haven't sorted out the accompanying Israeli wine yet...).

Regretfully I can't promise Truffle shavings' as supplies are low at the moment. (But if guests choose to bring their own we'll gladly incorporate it in the dish).

Happy landings.

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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For us , here in Israel Magimix (for food processor) is what Fridgeder and Coke are for Americans I guess .

As I was saying, are machine grated latkes artisanal?. In fact in our house machine grating is discouraged. it's hand grated or bust.

Where is Israel do we have to go for the latkes and what else are you serving?

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Well, I'll still keep my promise. Moul yam is around, Avazi as well. Roshfeld, much to my regret is closed due to "The way things are going over there". But I guess he is available for private occasions.

Most of us get our Latkes domestically.

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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Thanks, Steve. The best you've ever had. I understand.

About sufganiyot. My late mother-in-law, an expert Israeli sephardic cook, made them by passing the batter through a funnel into the oil, resulting in abstract fried strands, which were then dusted with powdered sugar.

I have a sense that the latke is probably the eastern European version of a rosti. The version that many Jews know has come down from poor families. No doubt the Alsatian Jews - both of them - and other prosperous Jews would have no trouble including things in their potato pancakes, including truffles and bacon. But for the vast majority of us who know them through our immigrant families, and who prepare them traditionally, just for Hannukah, they are special and simple and delicious in their homeliness.

Who said "There are no three star restaurants, only three star meals"?

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I notice in the above recipes that the grated potatoes seemed to be squeezed almost dry after adding all the other ingredients. I've always squeezed them before adding the eggs, flour, etc. Is this wrong? I also add a touch of cream to the mix.

I've always squeezed the grated potatoes dry before adding any other ingredients other than the grated onion. It just seems logical. Why strain out the eggs or salt and pepper?

You know, Stefalah and NSM, I argued about this, but some family dynamic made me follow my sister's directions anyway. I did drain off a lot of liquid after grating. Next time I'm doing it your way.

I left the apple skins on, which turned the applesauce a very pretty shade. And added a bit of cinnamon, so there. :biggrin:

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I left the apple skins on, which turned the applesauce a very pretty shade.  And added a bit of cinnamon, so there. :biggrin:

NO CINNAMON! :angry:

I read that Nina felt the same way... And actually, I think a great apple sauce can be made with just great apples cooked to the perfect consistency. Maybe a hint of sugar. But it needs very little. Cinnamon is great for Pie... :rolleyes: But not to serve alongside such marvelous wonders as Latkes.

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NO CINNAMON! :angry:

I read that Nina felt the same way... And actually, I think a great apple sauce can be made with just great apples cooked to the perfect consistency.  Maybe a hint of sugar.  But it needs very little.  Cinnamon is great for Pie... :rolleyes: But not to serve alongside such marvelous wonders as Latkes.

It was a soupçon of cinnamon...not really detectable as such, just enough to add a hint of warm spiciness. I'd used a mix of heirloom apples which were very flavorful.

My grandmother always put cinnamon in her Chanukah applesauce, so I did too. When you & Nina come over for latkes, Suvir dear, I'll make it without. :laugh:

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My grandmother always put cinnamon in her Chanukah applesauce, so I did too.  When you & Nina come over for latkes, Suvir dear, I'll make it without.  :laugh:

And my grandmother did not know how to make Chanukah applesauce or Latkes for that matter. :shock:

But she did make aloo ke cheele and we ate them with tomato chutney and yogurt.

And thanks for inviting Nina and me over for Latkes. Can you PM us the date and time please. And also thanks for skipping on the cinnamon. But I am sure just a pinch of it can do wonders. Your grandma was a smart cookie. :smile: And I have to agree, a little cinnamon can add warmth if not much flavor. And that warm by itself is a wonderful taste. Nina and I are both referring to that clawing apple pie addition of cinnamon (in copious amounts) I think. Not what Grandma or you did. :smile: I would tend to err with grandmas. They know far more than most other mortals.

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Sufganiot are chanukah doughnuts filled with sweet cheese or preserves and often served along with latke.

Azlee,

I dreamt all night of these. Thanks for opening up my horizons even further in my quest for all things sweet.

I shall now be on a new mission. Finding authentic Sufganiot. But till then, I shall make some donuts at home... or even go to Krispy Kreme if I am too lazy.

But thanks for explaining to me (and certainly other lurkers who like me did not know this) what Sufganiot are. :smile:

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Sufganiot are chanukah doughnuts filled with sweet cheese or preserves and often served along with latke.

Azlee,

I dreamt all night of these. Thanks for opening up my horizons even further in my quest for all things sweet.

I shall now be on a new mission. Finding authentic Sufganiot. But till then, I shall make some donuts at home... or even go to Krispy Kreme if I am too lazy.

But thanks for explaining to me (and certainly other lurkers who like me did not know this) what Sufganiot are. :smile:

Again, in case you missed it, there are variations in sufganiyot that are equally authentic that in no way resemble doughnuts, except that they are cooked in oil.

Sufganiyot are served at the same time of year as latkes, and often at the same meal, because they are both cooked in oil, but they are not served together. One is sweet, the other savory.

Who said "There are no three star restaurants, only three star meals"?

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Sufganiot are chanukah doughnuts filled with sweet cheese or preserves and often served along with latke.

Azlee,

I dreamt all night of these. Thanks for opening up my horizons even further in my quest for all things sweet.

I shall now be on a new mission. Finding authentic Sufganiot. But till then, I shall make some donuts at home... or even go to Krispy Kreme if I am too lazy.

But thanks for explaining to me (and certainly other lurkers who like me did not know this) what Sufganiot are. :smile:

Again, in case you missed it, there are variations in sufganiyot that are equally authentic that in no way resemble doughnuts, except that they are cooked in oil.

Sufganiyot are served at the same time of year as latkes, and often at the same meal, because they are both cooked in oil, but they are not served together. One is sweet, the other savory.

What would I do without (I had said with before I edited) Azlee and you? :shock:

Thanks! You are both very kind. :smile:

I think it was Steve Klc that had recently said that he loved all things deep fried. And I must say, I do too.

So Latkes and Sufganiot will be my new friends.

And what perfect timing.. I can enjoy these new treats when many others will be doing the same.

Edited by Jason Perlow (log)
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Yes Robert, I agree. There are many variations of these 'doughnuts'. They can be served as part of the same meal, but not usually as accompaniments to one other. And like any family favorite, they can be made and served at any time of the year.

Azlee

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In recent years we have, in Israel various "modern" fillings for the Sufganiot, along with the traditional Strawberry jam you can find it also with Dolce-de=latte, chocolate, White chocolate and Vanilla cream

"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

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Last Wednesday's LA Times had a nice article by Claudia Roden on fried Hanukkah treats, touching on, among others, her own Egyptian Jewish tradition. As in her books, I think she always has something interesting to impart. Here it is. (Registration is required, I believe.)

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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In recent years we have, in Israel various "modern" fillings for the Sufganiot, along with the traditional Strawberry jam you can find it also with Dolce-de=latte, chocolate, White chocolate and Vanilla cream

Hnnnngry... These sound great too. I am a sucker for all things sweet. I need to come visit Israel soon. While we talk of Israel, what is the best time of the year for someone to make their first trip there?

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