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Venice Restaurants: Reviews & Recommendations


circeplum
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This post will supplement and update the colloquy on da Fiore between Vigna and Joe H. Their comments on the cost of dining at da Fiore frightened my wife and I off. However, while marching through western San Marco in search of evening chicchetti, in May, 2005, we found ourselves there and took a gander at the menu. It looked to be only somewhat more expensive than Alle Testiere, on which I have reported separately. Then I noticed they have a chicchetti operation of their own, adjoining the restaurant. We had an ample mixed plate of fried schie and fried calamari and two small glasses of pinot grigio. Suffice it to say the calamari made every prior version of that dish seem like it came from Goodyear. Total tab was E8.

We were hooked! Reservations for lunch the next day were made on the spot. We split an order of the cold mixed seafood antipasto, which was more than sufficient for the two of us and were duly impressed. My wife followed with her old reliable, spaghetti vongole, and was highly pleased. I was less impressed with my pasta dish, which closely resembled hers, but substituted tuna for the clams. We shared a bottle of aqua minerale, a bottle of pinot grigio, and a tiramisu. Total tab with service included was E87.

We found our lunch at Alle Testiere more enjoyable than the one at da Fiore, but are mindful that our choices of dishes at the former may have been more inspired than at the latter.

In any event, have a late lunch somewhere and head for da Fiore's chiccheti operation in the evening. It should not be missed. And trust me that the chichetti operation and the restaurant are part of the same operation. I have the register receipts to prove it.

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This sounds like Bar and Trattoria da Fiore. That's where we went, and I've been curious if they are related to Osteria da Fiore. At any rate, there's a sit down-type place, and then a cichetti bar adjoining next door. And they are on a main thoroughfare leading away from San Marco. The only reason I suggest that this might be the case is that I'm unaware that Osteria da Fiore has and adjoining cichetti operation, but I'm not so up on any recent developments on the Venice dining scene.

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This sounds like Bar and Trattoria da Fiore.  That's where we went, and I've been curious if they are related to Osteria da Fiore.  At any rate, there's a sit down-type place, and then a cichetti bar adjoining next door.  And they are on a main thoroughfare leading away from San Marco.  The only reason I suggest that this might be the case is that I'm unaware that Osteria da Fiore has and adjoining cichetti operation, but I'm not so up on any recent developments on the Venice dining scene.

They are not related to da Fiore, and the name of the place in San Marco is just Fiore. And it's not really on a main thoroughfare, but in a calle off Campo San Stefano.

"The" da Fiore DOES have a sort of sister restaurant, the fabulous pizzeria Il Refolo, which is much less expensive than (and totally different than) da Fiore. It is run by the owner's son Damiano Martin and is behind the San Giacomo 'dell Orio in Santa Croce. It is only open in the warm months.

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  • 4 months later...

I’m in Venice for four nights, 12/29-1/2. I want to eat fish (meat will be amptly covered in Marche and ER). I’ve read all the relevant threads in this forum (i.a., Venice Guide, Brown, Cyn).

Despite the cautionary posts by Cyn and Robert Brown (and in the hope that it will not be a bad apple but rather as thoroughly delectable as a Really Wonderful Honey Crisp), I’ve reserved a table for dinner on 12/30 at Trattoria Laguna, and Alvise has kindly offered to pick us up. I’ve asked that the dinner be scheduled to allow, at a minimum, for timely arrival for the last vaporetto.

Here’s where I wanted to go, but they’re closed during our visit:

● Fiore

● Osteria alle Testiere

● Calandre

Also closed:

● Antica Osteria da Cera

● Covo

● Omar

● Mascaron

● Osteria al Portego

● Trattoria alla Madonna

Here’s what we’re definitely doing:

● Osteria Antico Giardinetto (thank you Vedat for a very intriguing write-up on Gastroville)

Bars we plan to visit:

● Cantina do Mori

● Harry’s (open?)

● Centrale

● Bancogiro

Restaurants under consideration (all apparently open):

● Corte Sconta

● Vini da Gigio

● Osteria dalla Marisa

● Osteria di Santa Marina

● Osteria Anice Stellato (was that once [and maybe future?] eGer Joe H posting on Fodor’s?)

Not particularly interested in (mixed reviews, scene, cuisine), but could be swayed, I guess:

● Zucca

● Ai Gondolieri

● Acqua Pazza

● Fiaschetteria Toscana

● pizza (pasta’s gonna be enough of a strain on the South Beach results I’m so proud of)

I would like the New Year’s Eve dinner to be cozy and very romantic. Do any of the above fit the bill? Does anyone have any more recent advice on the above or, alternatively, other suggestions? Thanks.

edited to add Gastroville link

Edited by cinghiale (log)
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Marisa is a no-brainer, of course. Eat there twice, then. Corte Sconto was the hot place 20 years ago, which was when I went there. It's a pleasant place, but I have no idea if the food has held up.

Use the time with Alvise in his car to discuss your meal. It's the kind of place where they speak the offerings and just keep bringing the food out. If I had it to do over, I would go with a bigger appetite and make sure I only had fish from the lagoon (no Norwegian smoked salmon!!!) including a whole fish even if it's from the Adriatic. I don't think they get a real big turnover, which can be the kiss of death in a fish restaurant in terms of freshness. Maybe because of the holiday season, there will good traffic there. Under the right circumstances, you should be able to eat well. It was just very dreary when we were there. But New Year's eve in Venice, why worry?

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I like Vini da Gigio, don;t see one of my small favorites Ai Testieri on your list.

Fiaschetteria Toscana is a Piatto do Buon Ricordo plate restaurant.. and you need to eat Fried Calamari and Shrimp to get it.. sounds tough!

The dish is called Serenissima on the menu.

I will be going to Venice next month and look around for you!

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Meanderer:

Al Fontego sounds pretty intriguing, even in spite of it being across from Vini da Gigio, which I'm strongly considering, particularly with Divina's recommendation. OMH liked it, and there was this from Food & Wine, albeit two years ago:

Chefs to Watch

Bruno Paolato at Al Fontego dei Pescatori Fans of Bruno Paolato (from his 15-year tenure at Venice's acclaimed Ai Mercanti) now head to his rustic new restaurant tucked under a shady portico near Strada Nova. Aromatic wild herbs and vegetables are his specialty: He features them in dishes like bigoli (handmade whole wheat pasta) tangled with tiny cuttlefish and mint; scampi and wild hop risotto; and crêpes with dandelion greens. The canopied garden is a charming place to sip Prosecco in warm weather—request the sought-after old-vines selections from Adami

Strange that there's very little in Italian on this place.

As for Agli Alboretti, I generally avoid restaurants situated in hotels. Dunno why, just a thing, I guess. It's also gotten mixed marks. I'll keep it in mind, though. Thanks for the tips.

Divina:

Thank you, also. VdG is on my short list. And I believe the other restaurant to which you refer is Alle Testiere, which is, as noted, unfortunately closed. It was my first choice. Please post after your trip with any finds. Thanks.

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  • 5 months later...

Secured myself a weekend in Venice in the beginning of June, and am looking for THE culinary gems that can be found in this touristy and partially overpriced city. My first time, and have been searching other posts extensively. Might give Da Fiore a shot for lunch one of the days, but elsewise looking for friendly suggestions from recent visitors.

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Robert Brown had a number of great writeups about his trips there the past couple years:

Here

Here

and

Here

Alle Testiere gets mentioned frequently here for a must try. The common comment (I think you'll even find it on one of the threads) about da Fiore is that its prices are in the stratosphere now, even for lunch.

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Kevin72 - thanks for the info.

I'm actually heading there in a couple of weeks - can anyone comment on the best bacari for cicchetti and tramezzini? Msoon-to-be wife is allergic to shellfish and is thus limited to what she can eat in Venice. Plus we want to do the little neighborhood places and save up for one big blowout (of course, a recommedation for that would be good, too.)

Lastly, we have tickets to La Fenice on a Wednesday - can anyone think of any great places nearby that will be open after the opera?

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Lastly, we have tickets to La Fenice on a Wednesday - can anyone think of any great places nearby that will be open after the opera?

please do post any replies on this to the list rather than PM, I have friends heading over for their honeymoon who just asked me the same question. (actually they'd probably settle for decent as long as they won't look too out of place dressed for the Opera...)

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

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Despite Robert's cautionary post, I had a great meal at Trattoria Laguna on 12/30. Alvise picked us up at the vaporetto stop and chauffered us back afterwards. The restaurant was near empty that night, and we were given a great table at the back. The fish and seafood were singularly fresh. Service was stellar.

We celebrated NYE at Antico Giardinetto, near the Rialto. The owner, Lolo, has a fish stand in the market. Again, the fish was superbly fresh. The ambience was great. Pricey, though -- albeit New Year's Eve. Vedat's write-up on Gastroville is here.

Sorry haven't gotten around to writing it up yet (incl. pix).

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I've eaten a couple of times at Avogoria in the far reaches of Dorsoduro. (The useless address is 1629.) When walking from the Accademia toward Campo Santa Margharita make a left turn just after going under the sottopassagio at the entrance to Campo San Barnaba. Follow that calle until you go over a bridge. Avogoria will be on your left in a couple of hundred feet.

The chef is Pugiese and the menu tilts that way. The interior is incredibly modern and enjoyable. Worth the trip.

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  • 2 months later...

What are people's recommendations for CAN'T MISS restaurants in Venice? The few places that one must go if there are only a few days available. Level doesn't matter so much as special food, experiences, etc. Need a way to narrow down from the Venice restaurants chain, and make some good decisions. Assume that the people involved have adventurous enough tastes that nothing is off limits.

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What are people's recommendations for CAN'T MISS restaurants in Venice?  The few places that one must go if there are only a few days available.  Level doesn't matter so much as special food, experiences, etc.  Need a way to narrow down from the Venice restaurants chain, and make some good decisions.  Assume that the people involved have adventurous enough tastes that nothing is off limits.

when are you going?

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I'll give you one of my favorites that you'll probably not find elsewhere:

Avogoria is at Dorsoduro 1629 (of course, a useless address). When walking from the Accademia toward Campo Santa Margharita, make a left turn after going under the sottopassagetta leading to Campo Barnaba. Follow this calle until you go over a bridge. Avogoria will be a few hundred feet ahead, on the left.

Its an ultramodern interior (don't miss the bathrooms). The chef is from Puglia and the food tilts that way. I've been there twice and have enjoyed the experience both times.

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What are people's recommendations for CAN'T MISS restaurants in Venice?  The few places that one must go if there are only a few days available.  Level doesn't matter so much as special food, experiences, etc.  Need a way to narrow down from the Venice restaurants chain, and make some good decisions.  Assume that the people involved have adventurous enough tastes that nothing is off limits.

when are you going?

I'm leaving Saturday (day after tomorrow), and will be there through the middle of next week.

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