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Boston Restaurant Recommendations


dweller
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Greetings - We have several food opportunities while in Boston in early November and am most curious to know of (1) a place for lunch Sunday (2) 2 ethnic places for Saturday and Sunday evenings where we can either get reservations now (eg two weeks in advance) or walk in and (3) somewhere open Monday lunch.

The East Coast Grill is still around and going strong. It's in Inman Sq., Cambridge and easily accessable via the Red Line. The focus has shifted from grilled meat to grilled seafood, but both are done very well. Since you are not driving, I'll recommend their fine selection of martinis.

Jim

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Greetings - We have several food opportunities while in Boston in early November and am most curious to know of (1) a place for lunch Sunday (2) 2 ethnic places for Saturday and Sunday evenings where we can either get reservations now (eg two weeks in advance) or walk in and (3) somewhere open Monday lunch.

We love food not décor, innovation not classicism and price not pomp.  (I know Boston a bit, having been born, grown up and gone to college there, but the restaurant scene changes so rapidly I love to try new places).  Many thanks.

If you enjoy Thai, 2 of the best are short ride on the Green Line to Coolidge Corner..Dok Bua and Khao Sarn. Both are excellent. KS is a little more "upscale"..full bar. Dok Bua is more of a storefront, BYO, more "rustic"..maybe a 10 min walk..KS is right at the T.

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Here's a link to the last Dok Bua discussion here

Dok Bua

I love this place, it's BYOB....Khao Sarn is also a favorite, with the added attraction of a lovely room, and Yoshi's amazing mango and lichee martinis...

I'm spoiled for any other Thai...

If you want a dive that serves the best cambodian I've ever tasted, go to Floating Rock in revere, Revere beach stop on the Blue line....You should probably plan it for lunch, tho, since they close around 7:30,....Seems to be par for the course for Cambodian restaurants...

I'd also consider Atasca, or Sunset Cafe in Cambridge for Portuguese food...Mind you, they're not as good as O Fado out in Peabody, but they're T-accessible...

My all-time favorite for Hong Kong-style seafood is Peach Farm in Chinatown....You can get great lobsters in ginger and scallion, wonderful eel, fabulous steamed oysters on the half-shell with black bean sauce, as well as the best spicy-salt fried squid in town....

And another vote for the east Coast Grill, tho I wouldn't call it ethnic.... :smile:

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Another shout out for both Dok Bua and Khao Sarn. If I had to pick for a single meal, I'm not sure which one I would choose. I guess Dok Bua because I can be a cheap son-of-a-gun at times.

Can we call Matt Murphy's ethnic? As in representative of the foods eaten by the folks from the exotic emerald isle? If so, it would be worth a stop. If you get the fish and chips (and I recommend that you do) be sure to ask for ketchup with your fries and tartar sauce for you fish, you will be pleasantly surprised. Even if you sat and had a beer while eating their amazing bread slathered with the huge slab of fresh butter they provide it would be worth a stop.

Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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Not too new but try Excelsior, No. 9 Park, and Mantra.

Haven't eaten at Excelsior but it was a Lydia Shire restaurant - now Eric Brennan formerly of Au'jourdhui and Harvest.

No. 9 Park is fantastic but make reservations as it is a small restaurant.

Mantra is good indian/french fusion restaurant with a happening lounge/club scene in the evening. It is downtown crossing.

Paul Goodman

Seattle Eats Out

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Clio and Uni. Clio is french with some fusion thrown in, and Uni is the attached sashimi bar. Both are run by Ken Oringer.

Andrew Baber

True I got more fans than the average man but not enough loot to last me

to the end of the week, I live by the beat like you live check to check

If you don't move yo' feet then I don't eat, so we like neck to neck

A-T-L, Georgia, what we do for ya?

The Gentleman Gourmand

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hope it's OK if I tag along with this thread....

We'll be in Boston for one night (prior to a morning flight) and staying at an airport hotel...no car.

We're also looking for a great restaurant for dinner...are any of those mentioned-above closer than others to the airport? Sorry, I'm not familiar with Boston.

As for restaurants that are great and not necessesarily new what would be a good choice?

We love most all cuisines but east coast seafood would be great!

Thanks so much

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Hope it's OK if I tag along with this thread....

We'll be in Boston for one night (prior to a morning flight) and staying at an airport hotel...no car.

We're also looking for a great restaurant for dinner...are any of those mentioned-above closer than others to the airport?  Sorry, I'm not familiar with Boston.

As for restaurants that are great and not necessesarily new what would be a good choice? 

We love most all cuisines but east coast seafood would be great!

Thanks so much

You'll need to take a taxi, but Logan is practically next to downtown. Try the East Coast Grill or the Blue Room in Cambridge. Also, a unique experience is Kelly's, on Revere Beach. It's a walk-up fast food place that has fabulous roast beef sandwiches and fried stuff.

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Hope it's OK if I tag along with this thread....

We'll be in Boston for one night (prior to a morning flight) and staying at an airport hotel...no car.

We're also looking for a great restaurant for dinner...are any of those mentioned-above closer than others to the airport?  Sorry, I'm not familiar with Boston.

As for restaurants that are great and not necesssarily new what would be a good choice? 

We love most all cuisines but east coast seafood would be great!

Thanks so much

Hate to ask this but what sort of price point are you looking stay within?

To save yourself $20ish in cab fare each way from Logan airport area to the restaurants of Boston of Cambridge I would recommend using the T (Boston Subway). The Blue-Line connects to the other lines at either Downtown Crossing or State and will only cost you $1.25 pp each way. It is safe, easy (and we'll help, I promise), and very well marked.

No 9 Park is an excellent choice. They have a 'restaurant' that takes reservations and is sort of high end in price. They also have a 'cafe' with smaller plates that doesn't take reservations. The food and service quality in both areas is very good.

No 9 Park is very near the Park Street T station that serves both the Red and Green Lines.

Clio is very, very good but it is an expensive restaurant (we ate there last weekend for ~$125 pp with wine). Clio is very near the Hynes Convention Center stop on the Green Line.

Slightly less expensive option is Sage in the North End. The North End is a reasonably intact Italian neighborhood just across the harbor from the airport. One bonus of going to a restaurant in the North End would be the ability to stroll around either before or after your meal. Great window shopping, excellent Italian pastries at the Modern Bakery (skip Mike's which will be more crowded). Sage has excellent food. Their risottos are fantastic and their gnocchi is pillowy and always well matched to the sauce that it is plated with. Good wine list. Make a reservation if you can. The whole North End is serviceable from the Haymarket T station which serves the Orange Line. This would be the closes part of Boston from the airport. (Note: there are other options in the North End if Sage is booked and you are intrigued by the exploring the neighborhood.)

Sel de la Terre is a highly rated restaurant serving French bistrot-influenced fare. We haven't been so we don't have any first-hand knowledge. One bonus of this restaurant is that it is close to the harbor so it is only two stops on the Blue Line from the Airport. Very easy to get to.

East Coast Grill is a good restaurant but is a bit tough to get to via subway. The seafood is fresh and it will be a bit less expensive than Sage. One bonus of a trip to East Coast Grill would be the ability to get an ice cream at Christina's afterward. Just a few doors down the street.

Hope this helps.

Edited to Add:

One cool option if you are interested in the North End neighborhood is to take a boat across the harbor from East Boston where the airport is to the warfs on the edge of the North End. You can take a free bus from the Airport to the Logan Dock and catch a water taxi to Long Warf and it is a short trip the the Sel de la Terre or the other restaurants. Fantastic views of the city for $10 pp one way.

Edited by slbunge (log)

Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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Hate to ask this but what sort of price point are you looking stay within?

***No budget restrictions.....just time restraints as we'll probably arrive in Boston early afternoon after a long day of traveling and then an early morning flight out in the morning.

Yes, we've used the T in Boston once or twice...should be able to figure it out.

We're staying at either the Hyatt or Hilton at Logan.

WOW, you've got me off to a good start !!!

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If you end up deciding on the North End, you're probably best served getting off of the T at Government center, on the Blue Line, 2 minutes more walking, but a lot less changing lines to get to the Green or Orange Line.... :smile:

Also, going in the other direction from the airport, consider Floating Rock, a hole-in-the-wall but wonderful Cambodian restaurant at the Revere Beach stop.

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Dear All; Thanks for your input to my query and others on the Forum. Due to some family, personal and professional obligations we did less ethnic food on the fly than we'd planned. We had our best meal (once again) at #9 Park and a surprising tapas tasting at Tapeo. Great Bay did well with the scallops but poorly with the fish, indeed good old Legal did better. And as for ethnic I loved the eel at Peach Farm but almost nothing at Khao Sarn. "Chacun...." I suppose. But again, many thanks. Next to Paris, Boston rules.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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We had our best meal (once again) at #9 Park and a surprising tapas tasting at Tapeo.

Glad you had a nice time. I just love No. 9 Park, both the restaurant and the cafe.

Interested to hear more about Tapeo. Was that a special event?

Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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We had our best meal (once again) at #9 Park and a surprising tapas tasting at Tapeo.

Glad you had a nice time. I just love No. 9 Park, both the restaurant and the cafe.

Interested to hear more about Tapeo. Was that a special event?

Not really, we had to go to a cocktail party earlier and just wanted a quick bite to eat; it was perfect for that purpose and the wine was good. It was a "special event" though for three others who had the "Happy Birthday" treatment.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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  • 1 month later...

I am from Western MA but now live in Houston and my husband and I are spending a few days after Christmas in Boston. He has never been and I haven't dined there in about 2 years.

I've read about Sage, but can someone recommend a quintessential North End old school style Italian restaurant? I am thinking something not too trendy but feels authentic. Price no object. I remember being able to walk around and smell deliciousness in the air around parts of the North End, so we would probably want to walk around before/after and get some pastry.

We also would want another dinner rec, not in the North End.

Also, we're staying at the Millenium Hotel downtown but are willing to cab, take the T and of course walk a lot. We'd love some great breakfast recommendations.

Am I crazy for feeling obliged to re-visit Pizzeria Regina which I do remember from my younger days? If so, which location?

Thanks so much.

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You really can't go wrong almost anywhere you go in the North End. One of my favorites is a tiny little place on Salem Street, the next street over from Hanover, called Rabia's. They have fresh made ravioli's that are to die for, and always a seafood dish, like half a lobster and seafood in a bouilabaisse type sauce over the stuffed ravioli's. Their chicken soup with tortellini and parmesan is fabulous and also their rose sauce, a pink cream sauce made by adding a hint of cream to a red sauce. So good, and medium priced.

Along the main road, Hanover Street, is where you'll find lots of great restaurants too. We ate just the other night at Strega, and it was excellent. They have homemade noodles done to perfection, and I had a veal dish, thin slices of veal rolled around an in-house made cheese and asparagus. Very good. My sister had the Veal Marsala and it was amazing. Another companion had their homemade Lobster Ravioli in a pink rose cream sauce. The breads here are wonderful, an overflowing basket, mix of focaccia, and italian, with a dish of olives, and a flavored dipping sauce. The atmosphere is dark and cozy, with black and red the dominant colors. Service was among the best I've had in the North End. Prices were medium, our meals averaged around $20 per entree.

Another real North End feel is Giacomos, also on Hanover street. They don't take reservations, so there's always a line out the door, and the prices are inexpensive, but the food is top notch. You pick your sauce, your pasta, and type of meat or seafood.

Another one that feels like a true Italian kitchen is Mama Anna's. Great Caesar salad. They are at the very beginning of Hanover Street.

Bricco and Prezza are newer, trendier restaurants, but both very good.

Mike's Pastry and Modern Pastry are within a block of each other near the start of Hanover street. You can easily walk here from your hotel, right at Fanueil Hall.

Modern has better Cannoli's, and Mike's has a bigger selection and fantastic homemade Torrone (nougat candy w/almonds).

Right next to Mike's is Caffe Vittoria, where you can go inside and sit down after dinner and have a cappacino or espresso, a gelato or dessert. They have by far, the best Tiramisu I have ever had anywhere.

So, that's the North End for you.

Elsewhere, well you're lucky, Boston has tons of great restaurants. If you want French, you could walk through Fanueil Hall towards the Aquarium and eat at Sel De La Terre, or even just have a drink and some Rosemary scented French fries as a snack at the bar.

There's also a Legal Seafoods there, if you want some good Seafood. They have a great baked Stuffed Lobster.

Right next to your hotel is an inexpensive Seafood Restaurant called the Naked Fish, featuring Cuban influenced dishes. I had a great Arctic Char there, coated with almonds and a delicous cream sauce. Coconut Rice came with it, and the Mojitos there, are the best rum drinks I've had anywhere.

The restaurant in your hotel is actually supposed to be very good as well, though I haven't eaten there. It is fun to have a drink in the bar though, and watch the people go by. They make fantastic apple and chocolate martini's.

If you want to splurge a bit, consider jumping in a cab and going to either Radius, Clio, or Mistral. My top 3 favorite restaurants in the city. All are pricey, but all have amazing food, and service. Clio and Mistral have a cozier atmosphere. Radius has an art deco feel to it, kind of South Beach Miami, but the food there is top notch. If you're not sick of Italian, you could consider No. 9 Park, which is in Beacon Hill, and is right up there with the others. Barbara Lynch's pastas are all homemade and melt in your mouth. Gourmet and a whole different experience from what you would get in The North End.

For breakfast, you could meander over to Fanueil Hall and grab something there, maybe at Finagle a Bagle, or you could hit any of the little deli's around the area for some eggs. If you want to go a bit fancier/heartier, you could stroll a few blocks into the Financial district and have a hearty Irish breakfast at Mr. Dooley's or an elegant eggs benedict at the langtham hotel.

You really can't go wrong here in Boston, we have plenty of great places to eat!

Pam

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Pam,

Thank you so much for that. I am writing it all down to take with us. Mr. Dooleys sounds like a perfect place since we loved breakfast in London in the past.

Also, all the North End insight is so appreciated. I have heard of a couple of them, especially Giacomos.

Pleas come post in the Texas forum if I can ever return the favor for Houston. This is a great restaurant town too.

SuperLuckyCat

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Pizzaria Regina is still fabulous!

But, of course, only if you go to the original in the North End, at the corner of Thatcher and Endicott Streets, I believe...They are the ones with the 90(?) year old gas-fired brick-lined oven, and they have a sourdough started they use or their dough...The other outlets, like Fanuiel Hall (Quincey Market) and Saugus, don't...

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There's also a Legal Seafoods there, if you want some good Seafood. They have a great baked Stuffed Lobster.

Right next to your hotel is an inexpensive Seafood Restaurant called the Naked Fish, featuring Cuban influenced dishes. I had a great Arctic Char there, coated with almonds and a delicous cream sauce. Coconut Rice came with it, and the Mojitos there, are the best rum drinks I've had anywhere.

Naked Fish, Legal Seafood...Both chains...Why would you do that?

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There's also a Legal Seafoods there, if you want some good Seafood. They have a great baked Stuffed Lobster.

Right next to your hotel is an inexpensive Seafood Restaurant called the Naked Fish, featuring Cuban influenced dishes. I had a great Arctic Char there, coated with almonds and a delicous cream sauce. Coconut Rice came with it, and the Mojitos there, are the best rum drinks I've had anywhere.

Naked Fish, Legal Seafood...Both chains...Why would you do that?

Legal Seafoods is a Boston chain though, and their Baked Stuffed Lobster is excellent. Naked Fish may be a chain, but they have some good food. Both places are just additional options to consider, and I didn't know if every visitor coming to Boston wants to only eat in high end places. I did list many options, and these were just 2 of them.

Not all chains are necessarily bad. It depends what you get. Legal Seafoods has fresh local fish, and it is a fun, touristy place to go while here.

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